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Seven Broward women business leaders to be honored

The Broward County Commission on the Status of Women will celebrate National Women’s History Month in March, by honoring seven Broward County women labor and business leaders who exemplify this year’s national observance, “Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business.”The Broward County honorees are featured this month in an exhibit in the lobby of the Governmental Center, 115 S. Andrews Avenue, Fort Lauderdale. Their achievements and contributions have expanded women’s participation in commerce and their power in the paid labor force.The honorees include:Katherine Birnbaum, City of Fort Lauderdale•  Sarah Franco, City of Tamarac•  Marcie Gershoni, City of Weston•  Andrea JohnBaptiste, City of Sunrise•  Karen Pandy-Cherry, City of Fort Lauderdale•  Pamella Reid, City of Miramar•  Danielle Williams-Rosse, City of Deerfield BeachThe Board of County Commissioners will present a proclamation recognizing National Women’s History Month on Tuesday, March 28, 10AM, at the County Commission meeting at the Broward County Governmental Center, 115 S. Andrews Avenue, Fort Lauderdale.The Commission on Status Women serves in an advisory capacity to the Broward County Commission and through education and advocacy, identifies and helps resolve economic, health and social issues facing women in our community. read more

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ACLU Sues US Coast Guard Over Alleged Detention and Abuse of…

first_imgThe American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed a lawsuit on June 12 claiming that the US Coast Guard improperly detained and abused four Jamaican fishermen for more than a month.On September 13, 2017, the Jamaican fishermen set out on a boat to Morant Cays, an offshore island group off Morant Point in Jamaica, to catch fish for their families. They were only expected to be gone a day. Instead, the four men got lost near Haiti where they were picked up by US Coast Guard vessels then taken to Florida and charged with drugs offences. No drugs were found, according to ACLU, and the drug charges were later dropped.The Maritime Drug Law Enforcement Act of 1986 made smuggling in international waters a crime against the United States, even if those drugs were not intended for the U.S. The US Coast Guard said they sought permission from Jamaica to prosecute the men in the United States and Jamaica complied.ACLU, a major human rights organization in the United States, stated in their news release, that “the Coast Guard seized the fishermen and destroyed their boat by setting it on fire and riddling it with bullets,” and “held the men in secret for more than a month, chaining them to the exposed decks of four different Coast Guard ships all while denying them access to shelter, basic sanitation, proper food, and medical care.”“The Coast Guard has no authority to kidnap and disappear fishermen who are trying to make a living for themselves and their families,” Steven Watt, a spokesman for the ACLU, said in the release.“The Coast Guard chained our clients to decks of its ships for over a month, exposed them to the elements, even during a hurricane, and didn’t even let them tell their families that they were alive,” Watt said in the statement. The families had initially presumed them dead until they were allowed to make phone calls in mid-October.The men were initially suspected of trafficking drugs, that were never found- according to ACLU. When each of the men pleaded not guilty to one count of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute marijuana, they were charged, and pleaded guilty to “knowingly and intentionally provid[ing] materially false information to a federal law enforcement officer during a boarding of a vessel regarding the vessel’s destination”.The ACLU suit says: “They pleaded guilty because they were told that it was the quickest and surest way to get back to their homes and families in Jamaica and to put an end to their nightmare.”They were sentenced to 10 months in US prison and deported in autumn 2018.The lawsuit was filed by the ACLU and the law firm Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP against the coast guard in the US District Court for the District of Columbialast_img read more

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UEFA Women’s Euro 2017: Favourites Falter As Underdogs March On

first_imgROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS – JULY 30: The Denmark team celebrate victory after the UEFA Women’s Euro 2017 Quarter Final match between Germany and Denmark at Sparta Stadion on July 30, 2017 in Rotterdam, Netherlands. (Photo by Christopher Lee – UEFA/UEFA via Getty Images)It is now certain that a new champion will emerge at the ongoing UEFA Women’s EURO after the tournament’s favourites all fumbled, giving room for underdogs to thrive and make history.Germany are eight-time champions, Norway have lifted the trophy twice while Sweden claimed it once,  but these teams are no longer in the picture.2013 runners-up, Norway were the first to crash out in embarrassing fashion from the group stage without scoring a single goal, then Sweden were shown the way out of the Netherlands by the hosts themselves in the quarter-finals.In front of a sold-out colourful crowd the Netherlands intimidated their Swedish opponents with two unreplied goals from Lieke Martens and Vivianne Miedema and progressed to the semi-finals of the Women’s EURO for the second time in three appearances.The biggest shock however was served hot and spicy at the Sparta Stadion in Rotterdam where the curtains fell on Germany’s 22-year reign as a result of Denmark’s dazzling second half comeback. The Danes defeated the defending champions 2-1 and will now face Austria in the semis.Meanwhile Austria are still writing their own piece of history in the Netherlands after seeing off Spain 5-3 on penalties. The debutants have now progressed to the last four hoping their fairytale continues.Then England became the last team to complete the semi-finals line up with a hard-fought historic victory over France, a team they had not beaten since 1974.A well-tailored goal by Jodie Taylor off a delightful Lucy Bronze cross did the magic for the Lionesses. It was top scorer Taylor’s fifth goal of the tournament and she said, at the mixed zone afterwards, that studying goalkeepers helps her a lot.So it’s the Netherlands taking on England in the second semi-final kick-off on Thursday. Both have been the most in-form teams in the tournament and coach of the Lionesses, Mark Sampson believes his side can cope with the hosts’ 12th player.Semi-final fixturesThursday 3, AugustDenmark vs AustriaNetherlands vs EnglandRelatedUEFA Women’s Euro Quarter-final Preview: Will Austria’s Fairytale Run ContinueJuly 29, 2017In “UEFA”UEFA Women’s EURO 2017 Final PreviewAugust 5, 2017In “Europe”Netherlands’ U-20 WWC Qualification Excites Vera Pauw [AUDIO]September 12, 2017In “Europe”last_img read more

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I Can’t Guarantee Nigerian-Born Players, Others Playing Time – England Manager

first_imgEngland u-21 manager Aidy Boothroyd has revealed that he can’t guarantee Nigerian-born players like Tammy Abraham, Sheyi Ojo and other players playing time.He also said that the strength of his squad means that some of his players could be “promised the world” to play for other countries.In his words, he said:“Tammy didn’t start the game before last but that’s just one of those things.”“Perhaps other countries will see that, get into him and get him in the first team.” he added.Speaking further about his players, 46-year old Boothroyd said:“You can’t blame them because they’re good players.”“It’s a hard one. I can’t guarantee they are going to play because the group is so good.“These are lads who have played for England who have an affinity with us and a relationship. When it happens with Sheyi I can pick the phone up, the same with Tammy.” he concluded.Young Tammy Abraham, who is on loan at Swansea City from English champions Chelsea, has been in the news recently after reports claimed the Nigerian Football Federation (NFF) were trying to convince him to play for Nigeria.Tammy is eligible to play for Nigeria through his father and has publicly denied those reports while pledging his international future to England.Relatedlast_img read more

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Currency strains impact Intertain Q3 2016 performance

first_img StumbleUpon Luckbox outlines final TSXV roadmap July 29, 2020 Related Articles Submit Share Luckbox raises CAD $3.8m ahead of TSX IPO June 12, 2020 Share Sportech highlights new client wins under lockdown June 26, 2020 Andrew McIverImpacted negatively by the depreciation of pound sterling against the Canadian dollar, Toronto TSX-listed Intertain Group (Intertain) has recorded a 7% drop in corporate revenues to CAD $113 million for its Q3 2016 performance (period ending 30 September).The operator who is preparing to float on the London Stock Exchange under its core brand ‘Jackpotjoy Plc’ would close its Q3 2016 reporting an adjusted EBITDA of CAD $43.8 million.It’s Severe currency impacts would see the operator declare a corporate net loss for Q3 2016 of CAD $31.8 million.Updating investors Intertain governance, detailed that corporate leadership continues to focus on its ‘UK-centered strategic initiatives’, which will see the operator headquartered in the UK.Despite its currency woes, Intertain governance detailed that the firm remained confident in its guidance, which outlined an adjusted net income of circa CAD $140-160 million.Andrew McIver, President & CEO of Intertain commented on corporate performance“We remain very focused on our efforts to implement the UK-centered strategic initiatives and are working hard together with our advisers to complete the listing of Jackpotjoy plc’s ordinary shares on the London Stock Exchange. Discussions with the UK Listing Authority in this regard are continuing and we will update shareholders as soon as possible on our progress.”“Higher revenue is driven by a stronger performance in all segments in their functional currencies, contributing to an increase in gaming revenue of 10% on a constant currency basis. Our Q3 financial results point to the continued solid performance of our assets.”last_img read more

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Conor Gray: Boylesports ready for UK breakthrough

first_img Speaking to The Sunday Times, Conor Gray Chief Executive of Boylesports has outlined the firm’s UK retail ambitions, as Ireland’s second-biggest bookmaker faces home market adjustments.Operating 254 betting shops within Ireland, Gray reveals that the doubling of betting tax duties to 2% of gross turnover, ‘will whip €10 million off Boylesports bottom line’.Facing a new Irish tax regime, Gray discloses that the 2% turnover tax has pushed 50 of its Irish shops into losses, with Boylesports considering a ‘programme of shop closures’, if the betting tax is not dropped.Leading the Dundalk business, Gray states that the time is right to diversify Boylesports strategy, entering the saturated UK betting scene, having acquired the 13-shop retail network of Midlands independent bookmaker Wilf Gilbert this June.Preparing to debut on Midlands highstreets, Gray now leads a long-term corporate ambition of Boylesports, which has pursued establishing a UK profile for the past decade.For Gray, the Midlands represents ‘a toe in the door’, for Boylesports to move on developing its UK northern presence, underlining that the business will target a region where ‘there is a high concentration of independent bookmakers’, confident that Boylesports can acquire further effective retail sites.Detailing confidence in Boylesports’ UK prospects, Gray highlights that the betting group will undertake the fastest operating adjustments to accommodate for the UK’s FOBTs £2 stake reductions, given that in Ireland, Boylesports has never had to rely on gaming machine income to prop up its retail revenues.“We have no UK retail experience, but we have plenty of experience of UK retailers,” Gray tells The Sunday Times – “We compete with the ‘big green house’ (Paddy Power) and the ‘big red house’ (Ladbrokes). We know what they sell and how they sell.”Supporting its UK growth strategy, Gray confirms that Boylesports executive team are actively seeking to acquire an online business, stating that ‘the odds [of doing a deal] are pretty short’. Submit Countdown to Cheltenham: Wednesday racecard ‘not a worry at the moment’ says BoyleSports March 6, 2020 BoyleSports closes Irish retail estate in response to COVID-19 March 17, 2020 Share BoyleSports signs Coventry City sponsorship August 21, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Related Articleslast_img read more

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Ukraine Rada begins ‘draft assessments’ but can it separate good from the bad and the ugly

first_img Ukraine gambling bill enacted by President Zelensky August 11, 2020 StumbleUpon Submit Andrey Astapov, ETERNA LAW: Ukraine faces critical choices as gambling finish line nears August 21, 2020 Parimatch hails top talent of inaugural ‘Universal Sports & Games Hackathon’ August 14, 2020 Share Related Articles Share Following the Christmas break, Ukraine MPs return to the Rada (parliament), in which the first readings of Ukraine’s newly planned gambling regulatory framework are scheduled to take place this week.The closing months of 2019 saw seven draft regulatory proposals put to the Rada, detailing little cross-party consensus on how Ukraine should end its 10-year gambling hiatus established under the ‘2009 – Prohibition of Gambling Law’.The diverging proposals agree on developing safer gambling measures and the protection of minors but maintain several points of conflict with regards to operator restrictions, industry governance, tax structures, market size and the number of licensees.Maksym Liashko – ParimatchDespite outright political support for Ukraine opening up its gambling market, industry stakeholders anticipate an arduous assessment period, in which MPs will have to review the merits and falsehoods of eight diverging bills.Speaking to SBC, Maksym Liashko, a Partner at Parimatch, said: “As far as we can see, the trend is this: the state is now moving away from the liberal concept that was put to the vote in December. And most likely in January a new bill will be introduced, which will contain more restrictions, primarily on the number of licenses and other conditions for operating a gambling business in Ukraine.“All the same types of licenses will be issued. The question now is more likely in the content of the bill itself, rather than conceptually on the issue of legalization, which remains on the agenda. The state clearly says that the industry will be legalized.”The governing Servant of the People (SoP) party have published the terms of its ‘law on legislating gambling services’ – a draft bill sponsored by Ukraine’s First Minister Oleksiy Honcharuk, acting deputy to President Volodymyr Zelensky.However, it remains unclear whether Honcharuk’s bill is supported by the party, as SoP members have submitted counter-proposals.Ahead of Rada assessments, SoP deputy Daria Volodina submitted ‘Draft Bill– 2285-10 – The Organisation & Conduct of Gambling’ – a proposal that would be lambasted for featuring no distinction between land-based and online casino services, attached to an ‘all-in-one’ licensing fee set a €25 million.Speeding initiatives, industry stakeholders will hope that the Rada is quick to drop ‘unicorn proposals’, and focus on draft bills that seek to establish effective foundations for Ukraine to establish its regulatory framework.Further concerns for stakeholders relate to the ‘transparency on licensing systems’ and whether the Ukrainian government will secure the appropriate provisions with regards to governing a gambling sector and its associated incumbents.“We welcome the practice of adopting international licenses,” Liashko added. “It is unlikely that Ukraine has the expertise to certify such software or slot machines at the same level that is now present in England, other European countries, USA and other countries where this industry has been represented for many years.“The adoption of international certificates, test laboratories and their results on the territory of Ukraine is very important. This will greatly simplify business entry, timelines, and reduce corruption risks.”Opening the doors of what could become Eastern Europe’s most lucrative regulated gambling market, Liashko and further business stakeholders await for further transparency as to how the government will establish an independent regulatory overseeing the relationship body between the state and enterprise.He concluded: “An important step that we expect is the establishment of a regulatory body. Either on the basis of the Ministry of Finance or separately as part of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine. Unambiguously, all the draft bills have a provision that such a body will have to develop more detailed conditions for issuing a license.“And this document is very important. There is no project of this bill today, but everyone is waiting for it. Because it will give a final understanding of how it will be possible to get a license, what requirements must be met.”last_img read more

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SIS secures Saudi Cup distribution with leading bookmakers

first_img StumbleUpon Share SIS adds Irish Greyhound Derby to its portfolio August 13, 2020 Related Articles Share Betfred extends World Snooker Championship deal until 2022 August 17, 2020 Betfred counters Oppenheimer bid in race to rescue Phumelela August 26, 2020 Submit Bet365, Betfred and Ladbrokes Coral are among a whole host of bookmakers who have secured rights with Sports Information Services (SIS) to distribute live pictures and data from this month’s Saudi Cup, nicknamed ‘The world’s most valuable horse race’.Customers of these bookmakers will gain access to live streams of the full two days of horse racing at the King Abdulaziz Racetrack in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.Paul Witten, SIS’s product director, stated: “We are delighted to have partnered with a number of leading bookmakers to provide their customers with live pictures and data, online and in-shop, from the world’s richest horse race.“The Saudi Cup is set to be a fantastic event and will help to drive both increased engagement and revenues for our operator partners worldwide.”Paddy Power Betfair, Phumelela Gaming and Unibet are among the other operators to have secured the rights to stream the Saudi Cup via SIS’s retail and online services.SIS has quickly found bookmakers willing to distribute the prestigious meeting after only announcing the partnership with the Jockey Club of Saudi Arabia at the beginning of the month. In a previous interview regarding SIS’s rights deal with the Jockey Club of Saudi Arabia, Witten commented: “The partnership strengthens our industry-leading international racing offering, while also benefiting partners worldwide through additional content that is sure to grab the attention of bettors.”The Saudi Cup further enhances SIS’s portfolio of international horse racing, which also includes action from the UK and Ireland, Australia, Dubai, Latin America, Mauritius and South Korea among others.The news follows SIS’s partnership with Pin Projekt’s sports betting brand, WWin this January in order to supply its 24/7 live horse racing and greyhound racing betting channels.last_img read more

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Is mobile esports heading in the same direction as PC?

first_imgThis is a guest post by Simon Sunden, Vice President & Head of Esports, GumblerTalk to gamers about esports, and the conversation tends to focus on the top teams worldwide battling it out in arenas, to large crowds for increasingly sizable prize pools. Simon Sunden, GumblerCertainly, the past year has seen esports hitting the headlines with competitive gaming becoming more mainstream, and non-gaming companies such as Audi, Bud Light, Axe and more getting in on the action to varying degrees of success. Another fascinating and much discussed move has been in PC esports with Riot announcing that the NA LCS will have a $10M flat-fee buy-in. But what about mobile esports? The popularity of mobile esports titles particularly Vainglory, Hearthstone (granted not a ‘mobile only title’), Clash of Clans and others has grown at an impressive rate with teams signing players and more high end tournaments to match. But as a different medium from PC, it’s interesting to consider how this will develop and the possible opportunities there are for the industry, and players.By its very nature, mobile has more of a casual element to it. Players can still commit to playing hours of the same game, but they can do so from anywhere they choose. You need only look at some mobile titles with leaderboards to see just how much time some players will commit to games to become pros, while others may just be content with the odd game here and there.“It’s my belief that mobile has a strong opportunity to lead the way in fostering a dual tier of esports gaming”At the pro end of the spectrum, players on PC, and increasingly mobile, have the potential to turn their passion into a money-making career. But why shouldn’t the non-pros or occasional gamer also have the chance to compete for cash and prizes? It’s my belief that mobile has a strong opportunity to lead the way in fostering a dual tier of esports gaming, where anyone has the chance to show off their skills. There’s real evidence to show mobile is already having this effect. Looking at the pro scene, high profile, Super Evil Megacorp’s made-for-mobile MOBA Vainglory has built a significant following. Well-known PC esports teams such as Cloud9, Fnatic, TSM, and SK-Gaming have all entered teams into Vainglory tournaments. The game has also proven mobile’s ability to to drive increasing prize figures, as the Vainglory World Championship demonstrated in 2016, with a $120,000 (£94,000) prize pot.“I believe that by 2020, amateur esports will be driving a huge part of engagement and revenue in esports, with the bulk of that via mobile”We can also look at what’s happening in Asia. Research firm Newzoo reported that “of the top 100 grossing games across all Android stores in China, an amazing 24 are considered esports titles”. Last year, Chinese publisher Hero Games held its Hero World Championship 2, with 28 teams from 15 different countries competing in homespun games like Crisis Action, Bomb Man and King Warship. The event generated an audience of 2,000 people, with a further five million watching the live stream. There are even challengers to Vainglory’s mobile esports crown. Chinese MOBA megahit Honor of Kings (which boasts a staggering 50 million DAU’s) is planning an assault on Western gamers. It recently soft-launched Strike of Kings, the Western version of Honor of Kings. It is likely we will see some kind of competitive esports element thanks to the deep pockets of Tencent, its publisher. Just as with PC, MOBA and FPS titles dominate the early mobile esports scene. However, these mobile FPS games primarily rely on on-screen ‘virtual joysticks’. Compared to the PC scene, these on-screen controls are no match for the hyper-customised mouse/keyboard combos of the PC scene. That’s one of the reasons for the emergence of strategy and card-battlers such as Clash of Clans, Clash Royale and of course Hearthstone. But does the early mirroring of the mobile esports scene with the PC-led scene mean that the trajectories will continue to be the same? Not necessarily. Mobile seems to be a much more accessible way to play competitively. We’re also seeing new genres of game catering to esports gamers outside of the typical ‘hardcore’ demographic. Take the mobile-only game Mad Skills Motocross 2 by Turborilla. Originally the motocross-themed racing game had a few competitive elements. Yet, in 2016, they decided to integrate skills-based prizes, meaning that players could wager money on their race times versus other real players. After just 10 months, over $900,000 (£708,000) was awarded in prize money with some of the top players earning as much as $6,000 (£4,725) a month. It’s interesting to note that these players are not pro-level gamers. Compared to a PC-gamer, who may play for 8-10 hours every day, the top players on Mad Skills Motocross may only play for 2-3. In a nice example of life imitating art, many of the top players are real life motocross and BMX champions. The other fundamental difference on mobile is that esports elements can be added into existing games, providing developers with a new source of income. The mobile esports approach can be successful at a much smaller scale as it adds ongoing income and retention on top of in-app purchases. Compared to major PC-esports titles and many have to rely on in-game items or skins to make money, rather than cash-based competitive play with swanky, high-stakes events as a marketing tool. I believe that by 2020, amateur esports will be driving a huge part of engagement and revenue in esports, with the bulk of that via mobile. The pro-gaming tournaments will of course still be there, providing the media-friendly glitz and glamour – but the real engine driving the industry will be millions of mobile gamers that would never dream of calling themselves a professional gamer.This was a guest post by Simon Sunden, Vice President & Head of Esports, Gumblerlast_img read more

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Adam Whyte – Red Monkey Collective – Censorship: a lawyer’s perspective

first_imgToxicity, bad language, homophobia, racism and a plethora of other issues remain prevalent in the world of gaming and esports. Just this week, renowned streamer PewDiePie used the “n-word” whilst being watched by thousands. Rightly so, he’s received extreme criticism across a multitude of platforms. Not only do streamers have responsibility, but in-game chat whether typed or vocal can be a cesspit of vitriol at the best of times. Red Monkey Collective, a talent and brand management agency have contributed two guest pieces surrounding the issue of censorship in gaming and esports.The first of the two part series came from Dahlia Penna, Esports Associate and more importantly, D.Va main. She talked extensively about her experience with toxicity as a female gamer as well as potential solutions. The second part of the series comes from Adam Whyte, Head of Esports. Adam has a legal background and discusses the censorship issue from a legal perspective. Please note, the full bibliography for attributed sources for both pieces is included at the end of this piece.There is a careful balancing act to be formed within the games industry when it comes to censorship; the publisher’s right to prohibit use of their product, the user’s right to freedom of expression, and the communities’ right to be protected from offense. There are several bodies of law that enshrine the freedom of expression/ speech. The 1st Amendment of the United States Constitution is oft referred to when one is discuss the freedom of speech and expression. Likewise, in Europe: The European Convention on Human Rights (1950), include Article 10, entitles all citizens of the ECHR to free expression.However, does an individual does have the right to be protected from harm from those around them? And what defines harm? John Stewart Mill states in his book On Liberty that the harm principles holds that the actions of individuals should only be limited to prevent harm to other individuals.“The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.”  (Mill, 1869)Mill distinguished between 4 types of acts that could be regulated by the government. The government could potentially restrict acts which:Cause harm to othersCause harm to selfCause offense to othersAre morally offensive.Mill’s theory that the state should only prohibit individuals from causing harm to another is inherently utilitarian. I.e. Causing harm, limits another freedom and their ability to maximize their utility to the community. In the context of gaming, limiting one’s free speech might inhibit their optimal team performance and/ or capacity to effectively transmit ideas within their team.“In other words, abiding by the harm principle is desirable because it promotes what Mill calls the “free development of individuality” or the development of our humanity.”  (Heydt, n.d.)Mill would definitely contest that “toxic” behaviour online is merely ‘causing offense’ rather than harm and, as such, should be allowed. Moreover, the legal frameworks which exist globally differ so wildly, and as such, it’s difficult to know whose duty it is to regulate “in-game content.”It’s understandable that few people/no one wants to hear horrible things. However, it begs the question: is it up to the user (who has the option to mute or block people) or up to the publisher (who can ban players) to regulate their online communities.Indeed, Evelyn Beatrice Hall (and not Voltaire) famously wrote in The Friends of Voltaire:“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it” (Hall, 1906)However, Voltaire was presumably ruminating and philosophising about the merits of free speech in an inherently restricted society. He certainly wasn’t a raging gamer who just got no-scoped by a Widow or was half a second from bomb defuse. Nor was he being trolled by a 9 year old.Mill wanted to distinguish between harm and having our feelings adversely affected (Lacewing, n.d.). Perhaps, a wider moral (rather than legal) argument here, is if the publishers really need to or should care about the feelings of their players, or if we should just get on with it.The question of younger players is also something that needs to be addressed: do game developers and publishers have a duty of care to underage players? See Riot’s League of Legends where, legally, everything and anything goes. But, this had made for a notoriously toxic community known for its lack of regulation. (LeJacq, 2015)Online speech regulation is a big topic in Germany at the moment. In July of this year, German parliament approved a plan to fine social media networks up to 50m euros if they fail to promptly remove hateful posts, in spite of concerns the law could limit free expression (McGoogan, 2017).Is it only a matter of time before other countries adopt this attitude? It seems that it is only a matter of time before this approach spills into other systems and communities, such as gaming and esports?“It is interesting to think that a governmental body with limited jurisdictional authority (Finnish laws operate only in Finland, etc.) may one day mandate that game publishers monitor and police their content or be subject to fines”One would assume we are, collectively and as societies, moving towards a realm of more free speech, less offence taken when the heretics publish misinformation or slander. However, perhaps we haven’t fully shed the shackles of a paternalistic society. Moreover, I’m certainly not fit to be the judge of what is fair and just or right and wrong.Many countries and peoples have decided that the state is fit to restrict civil liberties when principles such as security and morality are affected. In such countries, the government may mandate restriction on the freedom of speech in order to protect public policy, this is evident in particularly important in autocratic and protective countries such as Switzerland, Sweden, Germany & Denmark?“So, yes – there is certainly a careful balancing act when it comes to freedom of expression, the right to a safe community, and publisher’s right to police their own content channels.”It’s interesting to look at the world of football with regard to government’s mandating particular behaviour from content organisers. Governments and regulatory authorities often oblige event organisers to ensure that their fans don’t behave in a certain fashion (Celtic vs. Rangers springs to mind). It is interesting to think that a governmental body with limited jurisdictional authority (Finnish laws operate only in Finland, etc.) may one day mandate that game publishers monitor and police their content or be subject to fines. Particularly when minors have access to such potentially vociferous and volatile content, perhaps someone does need to step in. What is ‘legally interesting’ is, uponst whom is this responsibility bestowed? Game publisher, console operator, government, the community, or someone else?People are constantly posting about how disappointed they are that publishers aren’t banning people for ‘inappropriate language’. Many questions can arise from statements like this, such as: who defines what inappropriate language is? Who should decide when language has overstepped the mark? Is language used in ‘private parties’ to be monitored or just language which is public? These posts are limited to 140 characters and whilst being both populist and sensational, they are often incredibly vague and offer no real value to how this situation should be properly addressed.So, yes – there is certainly a careful balancing act when it comes to freedom of expression, the right to a safe community, and publisher’s right to police their own content channels. However, simply banning the heretics probably doesn’t reflect the true beauty of gaming & esports, that it is community driven.  Moreover, it presumes that the community itself isn’t able to properly regulate this with user-lead features such as child-mode for chat channels, muting squeakers & those who choose to act like idiots, and downvoting someone until they are unable to match with anyone based on their poor reputation.Concluding, in an ideal world, we wouldn’t have people saying mean things to each other to evoke emotive and primal responses. However, we do, and this hurts the feelings of most people who are trying to enjoy a peaceful and meaningful existence. As such, perhaps we can extend Mill’s principle of harm to words that cause pain. However, it is dangerous to allow the offended the arbiter of what is fair and offensive. ((YouTube, 2017)Therefore, perhaps rather than attempting to solve this complex matter with legal instruments that might not even exist yet (cross jurisdictional, digital prohibitions on certain mediums of language), we should let the community decide what is true, fair and just, and do our best to game with the nice folks.References:Calleja, G. (2010). Digital Games and Escapism. Games and Culture, 5(4), pp.335-353.Dunckley, V. (2015). Reset your child’s brain. New World Library.Hall, Evelyn Beatrice (1 January 1906). “The friends of Voltaire;”. LondonHeydt, C. (n.d.). Mill, John Stuart | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. [online] Iep.utm.edu. Available at: http://www.iep.utm.edu/milljs/#H1 Holfeld, B. and Sukhawathanakul, P. (2017). Associations Between Internet Attachment, Cyber Victimization, and Internalizing Symptoms Among Adolescents. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 20(2), pp.91-96.Lacewing, (2017). [online] Available at: http://documents.routledge-interactive.s3.amazonaws.com/9781138793934/A2/Mill/MillHarmOffence.pdf [Accessed 9 Aug. 2017].LeJacq, Y. (2015). How League Of Legends Enables Toxicity. [online] Kotaku. Available at: http://kotaku.com/how-league-of-legends-enables-toxicity-1693572469 [Accessed 9 Aug. 2017].Lin, H., Sun, C.-T., & Tinn, H.-H. (2003). Exploring clan culture: social enclaves and cooperation in online games. Proceedings of DiGRA (pp. 288-299). Utrecht: University of Utrecht.Maher, B. (2016). Can a video game company tame toxic behaviour?. Nature, 531(7596), pp.568-571.McGoogan, C. (2017). Germany to fine Facebook and YouTube €50m if they fail to delete hate speech. The Guardian. [online] Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/06/30/germany-fine-facebook-youtube-50m-fail-delete-hate-speech/ [Accessed 9 Aug. 2017].Mill, John Stuart. On Liberty. London: Longman, Roberts & Green, 1869; Bartleby.com, 1999YouTube. (2017). Christopher Hitchens and Stephen Fry – Blasphemy [2006]. [online]last_img read more

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