Giuliana And Bill Rancic To Speak At Breast Cancer Fundraiser

first_imgma Cares and Market America|SHOP.COM are proud to be a supporting sponsor, along with Crown Automotive, Aetna, LabCorp and Ralph Lauren for the Gathering of Friends Gala Dinner to benefit Earlier.org, a Greensboro-based non-profit organization dedicated solely to funding research to find an earlier biological test for breast cancer.The event, which will take place Saturday, October 26 at the Grandover Resort and Conference Center in Greensboro, N.C., will feature celebrity couple Giuliana and Bill Rancic.Gathering of Friends Gala Dinner will include a 5:30 p.m. fashion show emceed by 99.5 WMAG Morning Show Co-Host Lora Songster and produced by dress Boutique Raleigh and Models for Charity. This show will feature one-of-a-kind designer fashions and well as known labels like Dior & Chanel donated by ma Cares, with models wearing the latest makeup styles from Motives by Loren Ridinger.“Breast cancer has touched the lives of our employees, family and friends and together we can make a difference by helping Earlier.org to develop an earlier test,” said Brandi Quinn, ma Cares President and Vice President of Operations at Market America.Husband-and-wife duo Bill and Giuliana Rancic charm millions of viewers each week on their reality show Giuliana & Bill, in which they share their real-life love story.A breast cancer survivor, Giuliana Rancic is an entertainment journalist, fashion and beauty expert, and trusted television personality who has reported from the red carpet events at every major event in the entertainment industry in addition to her duties as anchor of E! News and co-star of E!’s hugely popular Fashion Police.In October 2011, Giuliana Rancic announced she had been diagnosed with an early stage breast cancer. Following her announcement, she underwent numerous procedures, including undergoing a double mastectomy in December of that year.Throughout her ordeal, her husband, Bill Rancic, has been by her side. A respected entrepreneur and television personality, Bill first came on the scene when he was selected by billionaire Donald Trump as the winner of the first season of NBC’s The Apprentice. Currently, Bill Rancic develops real estate in Chicago, produces and appears in several television programs, and speaks to businesses and organizations on motivational and business topics.Tickets for Gathering of Friends Gala Dinner are still available and start at $175. For more information about Earlier.org and the Gathering of Friends Gala Dinner, or to learn more about sponsorship opportunities for this event, visit Earlier.org. or contact Kara McBurney at (336) 286-6620 or kmcburney@earlier.org.To learn more about ma Cares and their initiatives, please visit Macares.org. Additional information can be obtained about Market America here.last_img read more

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Jane Goodall Speaks Out Against Plight Of Baboons Used For Research In

first_imgWorld famous primatologist, Dr Jane Goodall, DBE Founder – the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace and distinguished field biologist and conservationist Ian Redmond OBE, have joined the UK animal protection organization the BUAV to raise concerns about the sad plight of wild-caught baboons used in research at the Institute of Primate Research in Kenya.An investigation carried out by the BUAV in Kenya uncovered the capture and captivity of wild baboons held at the Institute of Primate Research in Nairobi under conditions which seriously compromised their welfare and breached international guidelines – including those of the European Directive and the International Primatological Society – before being subjected to disturbing experiments by visiting researchers from the USA and Europe. Some of the baboons were housed on their own in small barren metal cages with no enrichment. Legislation in Kenya relating to animal experiments is outdated and hopelessly inadequate.“I have watched the video that shows, in graphic detail, the conditions endured by some of the baboons at the Institute of Primate Research in Nairobi,” said Jane Goodall. “I was shocked and deeply distressed to see these intelligent primates – we have been studying them at Gombe National Park since 1966 – being kept in the conditions depicted in your film. These cages are very far removed from the conditions dictated by today’s animal welfare guidelines. In most countries these conditions would not be tolerated and those responsible would be forced to clean up their act.“During an 18 month investigation, ordered by the Director of the National Institutes of Health in the USA, a team of experts found that NOT ONE EXPERIMENT being carried out on the Institute’s chimpanzees was beneficial to human health. And the Director ordered almost all of the more than 300 chimpanzees to be retired to sanctuaries. And chimpanzees are far closer to humans than baboons. So that a similar investigation might well reveal similar results.“Any caring and compassionate person will feel as angry and sad as I do after viewing the video. In my professional opinion the facility – at least as depicted in the video – should be closed down.”Field biologist and conservationist, Ian Redmond OBE, added: “Wildlife tourism is one of the mainstays of the Kenyan economy, and many Kenyans dedicate their life to protecting wild animals. They – and the millions of tourists with happy memories of watching the fascinating behaviour of baboon family life – will be shocked to hear that these intelligent social animals are being abused in a biomedical laboratory in Kenya. Baboons and other primates have a role to play in Africa’s ecosystems (which benefit us all) and have no place in out-dated research methods like this in the 21st century. I urge the Kenya Government to end such invasive experiments before outraged tourists vote with their feet.”Experiments carried out on wild baboons at the Institute Primate Research was often highly invasive, caused immense suffering and was even fatal. It included invasive brain surgery; stitching the wombs of female baboons shut so that their menstrual blood accumulates over many weeks into a large abdominal mass in an attempt to trigger painful endometriosis; infecting baboons with malarial parasites (in some experiments, infection was allowed to run its full course until all the baboons died).In December 2013, Newcastle University announced that it would end its involvement in controversial research on wild-caught baboons at the Institute of Primate Research, after the BUAV investigation uncovered researchers bypassing UK law (which banned the use of wild-caught primates in research in 1995) to travel to Kenya. This was also found to be a breach of guidance by UK funding bodies which requires UK researchers to maintain UK welfare standards when carrying out experiments abroad.The BUAV is calling on the Kenyan government to take a stand and dissociate itself from the cruelties of the wild-caught trade by introducing a ban on the capture and use of wild primates for research.last_img read more

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Joanna Lumley Calls For End Of Experiments On Primates At Leading EU

first_imgIconic English actress Joanna Lumley OBE has joined the BUAV in calling for action after the organisation exposed the grim reality of life for monkeys behind the closed doors of one leading European research laboratory.Long term supporter of the British campaigning organisation, Joanna spoke out upon hearing about the undercover investigation a living nightmare which revealed the suffering of primates at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics (MPI) in Germany.Joanna stated: “Although it is horrifying to watch the footage of these monkeys suffering, it is essential that these cruelties are exposed by groups such as the BUAV to show the reality of life and death for these poor creatures. I urge everyone to support the BUAV in its efforts to end these inhumane experiments.”The BUAV leads the campaign to end the international trade in nonhuman primates for research. Time and time again its hard hitting investigations have exposed the inherent cruelty and suffering that is inflicted on primates. This investigation carried out with the German animal group, Soko Tierschutz, reveals a truth that is a world away from the highly misleading propaganda put out by the research industry.At the MPI, the monkeys were subjected to major surgery to implant head posts and/or head chambers into their skulls; many suffered bruised and bleeding head wounds. During the experiments, the monkeys were imprisoned by their necks in devices – with their heads held rigid by a surgically implanted post – inside dark, silent chambers and forced to carry out mundane tasks over and over for up to five hours a day, five days a week, month after month, in order to receive a small fluid reward.The BUAV’s CEO, Michelle Thew, said: “We are delighted that Joanna has joined our call for these experiments to end. The research industry would have you believe that the monkeys’ activity is voluntary, using innocuous words such as “training” and “sitting” in a chair”. The reality is however, that these wild animals are forced to do these things by being water deprived for extended periods, and being physically restrained in highly abnormal and uncomfortable positions for many hours at a time. The findings of our investigation reveal the harsh reality and immense suffering inflicted on these monkeys.”Joanna Lumley joins Dr Jane Goodall DBE and Ricky Gervais in speaking out against these cruel primate experiments.last_img read more

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Billy Joel Helps Nassau BOCES Long Island High School For The Arts

first_imgLegendary musician and Long Island native, Billy Joel will speak with students at the Hillwood Recital Hall in Tilles Center for the Performing Arts at LIU Post, on February 8, 2016, for an “Afternoon of Questions & Answers… And a Little Music” to raise awareness of the Nassau BOCES Long Island High School for the Arts (LIHSA) and encourage enrollment.The students will come from both LIHSA, the only public high school arts program that serves students from across Long Island, and Long Island University. Other attendees will include superintendents and prospective students.Joel, a strong supporter of the arts in public schools, wrote a letter in November 2015 to the Nassau BOCES Board expressing his support for LIHSA’s continuation. The Syosset-based arts program is funded by student tuition from public school districts. Enrollments have been declining for the last several years due to the New York State property tax levy cap.Good teachers have made an impact on Joel. “I went to public school on Long Island and I am grateful for the music program and my music teachers for helping provide me the tools for which I have based my career,” Joel wrote in the letter. “I understand that closing this school does not mean the end of music and arts programs on Long Island, but it does indicate our willingness to abandon a school that has been there for 40 years rather than build it up into something Long Island and New York State can be proud of.”Joel has donated $1 million to help the cause.He hopes that his support will bring awareness to the need for rigorous arts education options such as LIHSA. The afternoon promises to be freewheeling and fun-loving. Joel will be spinning yarns, playing music and offering snippets of advice to the aspiring musicians in the house.LIHSA instructors, who are all working professionals in the arts, focus on cultivating their students’ talents and building skills towards a career pathway in the arts. Major focus areas include dance, film, music, theatre and visual arts. Learn more at www.nassauboces.org/lihsa.last_img read more

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Mark Hamill Attends International Myeloma Foundation Comedy Celebration Hosted By Ray Romano

first_imgLast week, the International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) presented its 10th Annual Comedy Celebration benefiting the Peter Boyle Research Fund and supporting the Black Swan Research Initiative (BSRI) at The Wilshire Ebell Theatre in Los Angeles.Ray Romano Performs At International Myeloma Foundation 10th Annual Comedy CelebrationCredit/Copyright: Matt WinkelmeyerHosted by Ray Romano, the comedy show featured hilarious sets by Bill Burr, Jeff Garlin, Dom Irrera, Larry Miller, Kevin Nealon, JB Smoove, and Fred Willard. The evening concluded with a special musical performance by Michael McKean and Annette O’Toole. The Oscar-nominated songwriting couple performed original songs they wrote including “Milwaukee Moon,” “Killington Hill” and “Closer Than Tomorrow.”Mark Hamill Attends International Myeloma Foundation 10th Annual Comedy CelebrationCredit/Copyright: Matt WinkelmeyerAttendees included Peter Gallagher (Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, New Girl) with daughter Kathryn Gallagher, Mark Hamill (Star Wars), Howard Hesseman (Wild Oats) with wife Caroline Ducrocq, Domenick Lombardozzi (Rosewood, Boardwalk Empire), Lesley Nicol (Downton Abbey), Alex Meneses (Everybody Loves Raymond), and more.In celebration of the event’s 10th anniversary, the evening honored Peter Boyle’s widow, Tony Award-winning producer and Event Chair Loraine Alterman Boyle, for her inspirational dedication and passion toward finding a cure. Following Peter Boyle’s passing in late 2006 from myeloma, Loraine founded the event to help raise money for research to find a cure. Since the first event in 2007, the annual celebration has featured over 50 celebrity comedians and musical performers, and raised over $5 million for the Peter Boyle Research Fund, which has supported the International Myeloma Foundation’s research. This year the IMF has achieved the unprecedented ability to launch two targeted Cure Trials.Prior to the show, attendees enjoyed a silent auction featuring iconic memorabilia and other one-of-a-kind items and experiences to benefit this important cause. Among the featured items was a pair of highly-coveted runway tickets to Rodarte’s Fall-Winter 2017 Fashion Show during New York Fashion Week on Tuesday, February 14, 2017. The tickets are also available for bidding nationwide on Charity Buzz, with proceeds going to the International Myeloma Foundation.last_img read more

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Amal Clooney Speaks At Texas Conference For Women

first_img“As women, there is a bond we all share,” Amal Clooney told a sold-out audience at the 17th Annual Texas Conference for Women at the Austin Convention Center. “It’s not a bond of geography or culture, but of shared experience. There are struggles that only women face. The worst thing we can do as women is not stand up for each other. [But] if we are united, if we keep up the fight for each other’s rights, there is no limit to what we can do.”Amal Clooney at 17th Annual Texas Conference for WomenClooney, a British human rights lawyer, has appeared before the International Court of Justice, the International Criminal Court, the European Court of Human Rights and various courts in the United Kingdom and the United States and she has held a number of posts within the United Nations. Most recently, she has begun a case against ISIS on behalf of Nobel Peace Prize nominee Nadia Murad, a young Yazidi woman who escaped capture and sexual enslavement by ISIS.The 7,250 attendees also heard keynote address from Abby Wambach, Olympian, FIFA Women’s World Cup champion and author, “Forward: A Memoir”; Diane von Furstenberg, iconic fashion designer, philanthropist and author, “The Woman I Wanted to Be”; Annie Clark, founder of End Rape on Campus, whose work is featured in the documentary “The Hunting Ground”; Nina Tassler, highest ranking Latina in network television and recently retired chairman of CBS Entertainment; and Linda Cliatt-Wayman, renowned educator and principal of Strawberry Mansion High School in Philadelphia. Texas First Lady Cecilia Abbott also addressed attendees.Themed “The Power of Us: Amplify your Voice,” the nonpartisan, nonprofit Conference, the largest of its kind in Texas, also featured breakout sessions led by more than 100 experts in the fields of leadership, philanthropy, health and wellness, finance, media, personal branding and professional development.This year, conference attendees visited the career pavilion for professional development workshops, resume reviews with human resource experts, LinkedIn profile makeovers and executive coaching with the International Coach Federation Austin and Texas Women in Business. In the Community Connection Pavilion, United Health Care provided interactive volunteer opportunities with Special Olympics.“Women derive incredible strength and inspiration when we come together to celebrate, encourage and amplify each other’s voices,” said Johnita Jones, president of the Conference Board. “And each year, we are reminded that we accomplish more together –this is the true Power of Us.”The Texas Conference for Women is generously sponsored by Cisco; Dell; Rackspace; State Farm; United; United Health Care; HEB; Texas Beverage Association; Deloitte; Liberty Mutual; Phillips 66; The University of Texas at Austin; USAA; Accenture; Akamai; Bonterra; Brandy Pham; erin condren; ExxonMobil; HomeAway; Huston-Tillotson University; IBM; Intel; KIND; Mary Kay; Master Card; Mercer; NFP;NXP; Oracle; Poo-Pourri; Retail Me Not; and Texas Woman’s University. Media partners include Austin American-Statesman; Austin Monthly; Austin Woman; Clear Channel Outdoor;iHeartMEDIA; KVUE; AAT; and The Texas Tribune.“Rackspace recognizes that amplifying the voices of women begins with a smart and dedicated community,” said Carla Piñeyro Sublett, Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Rackspace. “We’re proud to partner with the Texas Conference for Women to provide the tools that will help women and the men who are their allies to thrive and make a difference.”last_img read more

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Come Dance With Us to support AUTISME SANS LIMITES

first_img Twitter Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment AUTISME SANS LIMITES (ASL) is a charitable organization whose mission is the development and social inclusion of adults with autism without intellectual disabilities. ASL programs are based on creating learning living environments in which preventative and community services are delivered to clients who have just left school or, in some cases, before. These learning spaces are adapted to their unique needs, and support teams help them develop their strengths and talents. In this inclusive environment, young adults with autism continue to evolve at their own pace in order to achieve their full potential, while avoiding isolation and resultant mental health problems. AUTISME SANS LIMITES is pleased to announce the launch of a unique campaign to get Montrealers to literally dance in the streets.From now through October 5, 2016, dances steps can be found painted on the sidewalk in front of the Aldo and Apple stores on Ste-Catherine Street in Montreal and we invite you to find a partner… to dance! And, better yet, improvise your own dance in a beautiful location and share your performance on film or photo on Facebook Entrez dans la danse (@DansezMTL).Dance for joy and for love, and to remember that special moment when you first joined hands with another. Dance in support of the Montreal premiere of the inspiring film How to Dance in Ohio, in which young autistic adults experience their first formal dance, at Théâtre Outremont on October 5 at 6:30 pm. Participants are invited to visit the website (www.ComeDanceWithUs.org) to purchase tickets for premiere (tickets are limited) and learn more about autism. Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

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TORONTO STAR SHORT STORY CONTEST

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Good Luck writers! The second-place winner will take home a $2,000 prize, while third place will be awarded $1,000.The winner can choose a 30-week creative writing correspondence program, valued at $3,000, at Humber, or a week-long summer workshop, worth $1,000, at the college’s Lakeshore campus in Toronto.Three prizes will be awarded:First Prize: $5,000, plus the tuition fee for either The Humber School for Writers 2018 Creative Writing by Correspondence (Approximate retail value: $3,000), or Summer Workshop in Creative Writing on July 8-13, 2018 at Humber’s Lakeshore Campus (Approximate retail value: $1,000).Second Prize: $2,000.Third Prize: $1,000. Facebook If the winner does not claim the prize within 48 hours of notification, the next eligible entry selected by the judging criteria set out in these rules will be contacted, and the first potential winner will have no further claim to the prize. Sponsor will not mail or courier the prize and is not responsible for unclaimed prizes.Winners must attend a prize presentation event at the Yorkville Public Library, 22 Yorkville Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4W 1L4 on or about Thursday, April 19, 2018 to collect the prize won.The winners’ stories will be published in the Sunday Star as follows: The Third place story will appear on Sunday, April 29, 2018; the Second place story will appear on Sunday, May 6, 2018; the First place story will appear on Sunday, May 13, 2018. Should any of the above-mentioned dates become unavailable due to unforeseen circumstances, the stories will run, in the order listed above, on the next available Sunday edition of the Toronto Star. Release:Prior to receiving the prize, the potential winner will be required to show valid photo ID and to sign a declaration of eligibility and release form releasing the Sponsor and its related parties from any and all liability in connection with the Contest and/or the prize, confirming compliance with the rules and consenting to the use of his or her name and short story in any and all forms of media, without further compensation, in any publicity carried out by the Sponsor and/or its advertising and promotional agencies. If a potential winner is under the age of majority, his/her parent or legal guardian must also sign and return the declaration of eligibility and release form. The signed form must be received within 48 hours of notification or the prize may be forfeited and awarded to an alternate entrant.Indemnity:By participating in this Contest, you agree to defend, indemnify and hold harmless the Sponsors, and their parent, subsidiaries, affiliates and/or related companies and each of their officers, directors, shareholders, employees, advisors, assignees, agents, licensees, representatives, advertising, media buyers and promotional agencies from any and all damages, injuries, claims, causes of action, or losses of any kind (including but not limited to lawyers’ fees) arising from your participation in the Contest, your violation of any term of these Contest rules, your violation of any third party right, including without limitation any copyright, property, or privacy right; or any claim that your submission caused damage to a third party. Privacy:We use your personal information to administer this Contest, including contacting, announcing and promoting prize winners, and may transfer your personal information to third party service providers (including but not limited to prize suppliers) in order to perform services such as prize fulfillment and delivery. The Contest is run in compliance with the Toronto Star’s privacy policy, which may be found in full at http://thestar.com/privacy.Banning:The Sponsor may, in its sole discretion, prohibit any person from entering the Contest whom it believes to be abusing the rules. Such abuse includes entering false information and entering more than once.Other:This Contest is governed by the laws of Ontario and the laws of Canada applicable therein and is void where prohibited by law. The Sponsor reserves the right to cancel or modify the Contest or the Contest rules at any time without notice. All prizes must be accepted as awarded, are non-transferable and are not convertible to cash. The Sponsor reserves the right to substitute any prize or portion of the prize with a prize of equal or greater value. All prizes are awarded as-is. Sponsor is not liable for any lost, late, misdirected or stolen entries or inability to process entries, or any errors, damage or negligence that may arise in connection with this Contest, including human error. Sponsor is not responsible for any errors or omissions in printing or advertising this Contest. Submissions will be judged by a panel of the Humber School for Writers and narrowed down to a short list. The three winners will then be selected from that list by city librarian Vickery Bowles, award-winning author and journalist Kamal Al-Solaylee, Toronto Star books editor Deborah Dundas, and the Star’s former theatre critic Richard Ouzounian.Agreement: These rules govern the Toronto Star Short Story Contest (“Contest”). The act of entering the Contest constitutes acceptance of the Contest rules and the decisions of the Contest judges, which decisions shall be final and binding upon all entrants.Sponsor: The Contest sponsors are Toronto Star Newspapers Limited, the Toronto Public Library and The Humber School for Writers (“Sponsors”).Eligibility: The Contest is open to all residents of Ontario who have attained the age of 16, except for employees, their immediate families and anyone living with any employee of the Sponsor or its corporate affiliates, advertising or promotional agencies. There is a limit of one entry per person.Contest and Judging Criteria:Contest begins at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday, January 6, 2018 and ends at 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, February 28, 2018.Entries must be received by 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, February 28, 2018.By entering this Contest you acknowledge that all entries become the property of the Contest Sponsors and will not be returned or acknowledged.To enter the Contest, submit your entry by the contest deadline in its own envelope. Stories submitted by fax machine and e-mail will not be accepted. Illegible entries will be disqualified.Stories must be written in English, original and unpublished up to the time the winners are declared on or about Thursday, April 19, 2018.Stories must be written on a computer or typewriter, be double-spaced and no longer than 2,500 words.Total word count must be printed on the front page of the story.All submissions are final. No changes or substitutions to a story are allowed once Toronto Star Newspapers Limited receives your entry.Manuscripts will not be returned.Entrants may wish to enclose a stamped, self-addressed postcard with their entries to ensure that their story has reached the Toronto Star Newspaper Limited.Information is not available by email or telephone.Pseudonyms are not permitted.By entering the Contest, entrants agree to allow Toronto Star Newspapers Limited to publish their stories, names and biographical information in all media, including but not limited to its newspapers and thestar.com without compensation. Entrants also agree to allow the Toronto Public Library and The Humber School for Writers to publish their stories, names and biographical information in all media. Do not send photographs with entries. Winners will be contacted about a photograph at a later date and must agree to publication of his/her photograph.In connection with your submission, you affirm, represent and/or warrant that (i) you own or have the necessary licenses, rights, consents and permissions to use and authorize Sponsors to use all copyright, trademark or other proprietary rights in and to your submission to enable inclusion and use of the submission in the manner contemplated by these Contest rules; and (ii) you have the written consent, release and/or permission of each and every identifiable individual person in the submission to use the name or likeness of each and every such identifiable individual person to enable inclusion and use of the submission in the matter contemplated by these Contest rules.Sponsor reserves the right to reject and disqualify any submissions that could be offensive or inappropriate or that do not meet the terms and conditions of these rules.How to enter:The author’s name, address, telephone number, email address and a 25-50 word biographical sketch must be included with each entry on a separate sheet of paper.The name of the author should not appear on the story itself.Mail or drop off your submission to:Short Story ContestToronto StarOne Yonge Street, 4th FloorToronto, ON  M5E 1E6Entries may also be dropped off in the Short Story contest box in the main lobby of the Toronto Star building, One Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario.NO ENTRY FEE REQUIRED.Judging and notification:Members of the faculty of The Humber School for Writers will complete the first round of judging starting on or about Wednesday, March 21, 2018.The finalists’ entries will then be judged by the 2018 Toronto Star Short Story Contest judging panel, who will select the First, Second and Third prizewinners on or about Friday, April 6, 2018. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received and the caliber of the entries. The decisions of the contest judges are final in respect of any matter relating to this Contest.The potential winners will be contacted by telephone or email between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on or about Tuesday, April 10, 2018 by a representative of the Sponsor, and must reply within 48 hours to maintain eligibility. If the potential winner(s) cannot be contacted within this time period or fail(s) to respond to any attempted contact, such potential winner(s) will be disqualified, his/her entry will be declared null and void and the Sponsor reserves the right, in its sole and absolute discretion, to select another potential winner based on the judging criteria, in which event these provisions shall apply to such other eligible entry.Ownership/Use Rights:Entrants retain the copyright to their stories. However, by entering the contest, you hereby grant the Sponsors a worldwide, irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, royalty-free, sublicenseable and transferable license to print, publish, use, reproduce, distribute, prepare derivative works of, and display your full name, short story and photograph in connection with Sponsors’ (and its successors’) business, including without limitation in any media formats and through any media channels.Prizes:Three prizes will be awarded:First Prize: $5,000, plus the tuition fee for either The Humber School for Writers 2018 Creative Writing by Correspondence (Approximate retail value: $3,000), or Summer Workshop in Creative Writing on July 8-13, 2018 at Humber’s Lakeshore Campus (Approximate retail value: $1,000).Second Prize: $2,000.Third Prize: $1,000. Shannon Elizabeth Login/Register With:center_img Advertisement Stories can be about any topic the entrant chooses, as long as it’s original, unpublished, and amounts to less than 2,500 words. Entries are limited to one per person.This year’s contest runs until 5 p.m. on Feb. 28.The winner will receive $5,000 and a creative writing course from The Humber School for Writers. 1 COMMENT LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Log in to leave a comment Mar-10-18 at 7:06 am Twitterlast_img read more

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SHAWN MENDES CALLS OUT ROLLING STONE PROFILE SOMETIMES THE POSITIVE SIDE OF

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Twitter On Twitter, Mendes pushed back on how his quotes were portrayed in the article, suggesting that the writer focused on the negative.Of course i have my insecurities and struggles but that’s just one part of me. Sometimes the positive side of a story doesn’t always get fully told and I wish it had here. I love what i do and i love you guys so much ❤️ pic.twitter.com/dmIHCtFc7z— Shawn Mendes (@ShawnMendes) November 26, 2018As for his relationship with Baldwin, who recently got married to Justin Bieber, the singer reveals that they had been something more than friends.“I don’t even wanna put a title on it. I think it was more of a zone of limbo,” Mendes says. “I texted Hailey [after her engagement], ‘Congratulations,’ and I really am happy for them. She’s still one of the f**king coolest people ever — she’s not just a beautiful person visually but she’s one of the most beautiful hearts I’ve ever met.” Canadian singer Shawn Mendes often feels like he has to prove he’s straight, even though he knows there’s nothing wrong with being gay.But the 20-year-old is now calling out his depiction in a candid new interview with Rolling Stone in which he opens up about his sexuality, as well as his past relationship with Hailey Baldwin.“In the back of my heart, I feel like I need to go be seen with someone — like a girl — in public, to prove to people that I’m not gay,” Mendes admits. “Even though in my heart I know that it’s not a bad thing. There’s still a piece of me that thinks that. And I hate that side of me.”Addressing the speculation surrounding his sexuality online, Mendes adds, “I thought, ‘You f**king guys are so lucky I’m not actually gay and terrified of coming out.’ That’s something that kills people. That’s how sensitive it is. Do you like the songs? Do you like me? Who cares if I’m gay?” Advertisementcenter_img Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement Photo: Ruven Afanador for Rolling Stonelast_img read more

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WHAT THEY DONT TELL YOU ABOUT BEING A BLOGGER

first_imgGlenda Decasa (Photo by Nicole Constante) LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisementcenter_img With the rise of social media (specifically instagram) rapidly growing at an alarming rate, everyone is aspiring to be an ‘influencer’ or ‘blogger’. And although I am 10000% onboard with anyone who is wanting to be one, there’s one key factor that most people don’t seem to understand —Blogging isn’t easy.There’s a lot of misconceptions to what exactly a blogger does. It’s more than just taking a photo and hitting publish. It’s so much more than receiving complimentary gifts, being invited to events and owning a perfect Instagram feed. It’s working 20+ hours a day, it’s preplanning your months in advance, it’s exhaustion, it’s vulnerability, it’s balancing your life and priorities. It’s a business and it’s also an extension of who you are. Facebook Advertisement It’s been almost 3 years since the official launch of Confessions of a Scorpio and what a journey has it been. Being a blogger has its both ups and downs but not once have I looked back and regretted my decision to leave my 9-5 to pursue my passion for writing.Taking a look back at my blog post that I created summing up my 1st year with COAS, I’m flabbergasted at how much I’ve changed as a blogger and as an entrepreneur. Granted, I always knew that change was inevitable, but within that short amount of time that I’ve made the switch to take blogging as one of the professions, I have learned so much about myself as a writer, a creative and as an individual.I’ve juggled many hats within the first year of becoming a blogger.I’ve been hired as a subcontractor to other inspiring entrepreneurs online as a virtual assistant specializing in graphic and web design. Don’t get me wrong, as much as I love to create and design, I personally felt like something was still missing. So I eventually finished all my last projects and contracts and refocused on my end goal. And that was to make a difference and inspire.last_img read more

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DRAKE MADE 6IX A THING IN TORONTO BUT HE JUST LOST HIS

first_img Facebook Advertisement Drake (Getty Images) Drake doesn’t own the 6ix — at least, he doesn’t own that trademark after a decision from the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO).The 6ix is, of course, one of the star rapper’s favourite nicknames for Toronto, and his company, October’s Very Own, applied for the trademark in the late summer of 2015.But, the CIPO found 6ix actually belongs to Michael Di Cosmo, a local electronic dance music DJ and producer, who applied for the trademark way back in 2000. Drake was a teenager at the time. Advertisement Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

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Algonquin chief to reject post father

first_imgBarriere Lake, Que. — The newly acclaimed chief of a small northern Algonquin community is expected to reject the position later today in protest over Indian Affairs’ decision to impose a band council under rarely used Indian Act powers, his father claims.Casey Ratt was acclaimed as chief of Barriere Lake this morning, according to the electoral officer hired by Indian Affairs to run the band election.Ratt’s father, Sever Ratt, told APTN National News this morning that his son would not accept the position. If Ratt rejects the position, it will undercut the legitimacy of the remaining band council who were also acclaimed this morning. Ratt had opposed the imposition of an Indian Act secret ballot band election imposed by the department to replace the community’s traditional mode of selecting leaders. Another community member who had worked with Ratt to stop the election of a  band council said the new chief was expected to reject the post.“He mentioned he had been nominated last week and he was supposed to decline that publicly or in writing,” said Tony Wawati.Wawati said he believed the community planned to continue fighting Indian Affairs to preserve their customary leadership selection process.“(Indian Affairs) pulled a fast one on us,” he said. Casey Ratt could not be immediately reached for comment. An attempt Thursday by Indian Affairs to set up a nomination poll was blocked by community members who turned electoral officer Bob Norton away for a second time.Norton said Friday morning that the new chief and band council had been acclaimed to their posts based on nominations handed to him over the past several weeks.Norton said Ratt was acclaimed as chief, along with councillors Anita Decoursey, Chad Thusky, Steve Wawati and Hector Jerome.Norton said all were nominated by at least two people.Norton said the results could be appealed to the deputy minister on grounds of corruption or faulty process.He also said that if two of the five quit it would force a by-election.Long plagued by internal divisions, warring factions within the community seemed to have formed a united front against the department’s attempt to abolish Barriere Lake’s traditional leadership selection process and impose an Indian Act band council.Former Indian Affairs Minister Chuck Strahl invoked rarely used powers under the Indian Act to abolish the community’s customary leadership selection code called Blazing.Strahl demanded the band use secret ballot voting to select their council in an attempt to end a power-struggle within the community.Barriere Lake’s custom code was based on the community approving or rejecting of candidates selected by an elders council.Ratt had recently signed a letter along with former chief Jean-Maurice Matchewan rejecting the imposition of an Indian Act band council.“The Algonquins of Barriere Lake are united in their fervent opposition to the minister-imposed band council elections,” sated the July 18 letter to Strahl.Barriere Lake, one of the poorest First Nations communities in Canada, sits about 300 kilometres north of Ottawa. APTN National Newslast_img read more

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Baby Trace waits for a new heart

first_imgAPTN National NewsKristin Whyte has become a ‘regular’ at the Ste. Justine Children’s Hospital in Montreal. She spends long hours there by the side of her son, Michael Beauvais, also known as ‘Baby Trace’.Trace was born with aortic stenosis — the opening of the aortic valve onto his heart’s left ventricle is extremely narrow, which means his heart can’t get enough oxygenated blood out to the rest of his body. It’s a disease that usually affects people aged 50 and older, and it can lead to shortness of breath, angina, and heart failure.Since birth, Trace has spent most of his life at Ste. Justine, waiting for a heart transplant.APTN National News reporter Ossie Michelin sat down with Baby Trace and his mother at Ste. Justine, and has their story.last_img read more

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Mandela to be buried with eagle feather

first_imgAssembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo performs a ceremony in honour of Nelson Mandela in Pretoria, South Africa. Photo courtesy of the AFNAPTN National News GATINEAU, Que.–Nelson Mandela will be buried with an eagle feather brought to South Africa by Assembly of First Nations National Chief Shawn Atleo, it was announced at a special chiefs assembly Wednesday.The eagle feather will travel with Mandela’s body to Qunu, the place where the man known to his people as Madiba grew-up and which will be laid to rest. Mandela will be buried there Sunday.Atleo gave the eagle feather to Canada’s high commissioner to South Africa who has the task of ensuring the feather gets into the hands of the South African government for Mandela’s final journey. Atleo also gave a smaller eagle feather to the high commissioner as a “gesture of friendship” and a symbol of the importance of the task.“The eagle feather was given to the high commissioner who has been charged with the responsibility,” said Ovide Mercredi, a former AFN national chief, who broke the news Wednesday morning to chiefs gathered in a Gatineau, Que., casino this week for their yearly winter assembly.Mercredi said the eagle feather was handed over following a ceremony in Mandela’s honour requested by Atleo involving the Canadian delegation, including Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Atleo sang a song from his nation used to honour the death of hereditary leaders, said Mercredi.Mandela was not only once president of South Africa and a leader in the fight against apartheid; he was also a hereditary leader among the Xhosa. His father was a tribal chief in Transkei and named Mandela Rolihlahla at birth. Rolihlahla means “pulling branches of a tree,” but colloquially it also means “troublemaker,” according to the Nelson Mandela Foundation’s website.“Our national chief was given the opportunity to perform a particular ceremony while Mandela was lying in state,” said Mercredi. “Our national chief said his prayer and also sang a song that is particular to his nation, a song that they used to recognize leadership and in particular hereditary chiefs and the name as you know that Mandela has been given is Madiba which is in recognition of his status within his nation, with his own people as a hereditary leader.”Madiba is the name of Mandela’s clan and stems from the name of a Thembu chief  who ruled in the Transkei during the 18th century, according to the foundation.Mercredi said the ceremony included Harper, three former prime ministers, two former governor generals and the premiers who were part of the Canadian delegation. Former governor-general Adrianne Clarkson held an eagle feather during the ceremony.Mercredi also said that Atleo also discussed Mandela’s legacy and the current relationship between Canada and its Indigenous population with former prime ministers Jean Chretien and Joe Clarke.“(They discussed) the importance of bringing to Canada the teachings and lessons provided by Mandela with respect to peace and reconciliation,” said Mercredi. “That leadership needs to be demonstrated in this country…The national chief is reporting to us that he has begun that dialogue of reconciliation of justice with the leaders he is travelling with.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Read the 94 Calls to Action here

first_imgLegacyChild Welfare1. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial and Aboriginal governments to commit to reducing the number of Aboriginal children in care by:i. Monitoring and assessing neglect investigations.ii. Providing adequate resources to enable Aboriginal communities and child-welfare organizations to keep Aboriginal families together where it is safe to do so, and to keep children in culturally appropriate environments, regardless of where they reside.iii. Ensuring that social workers and others who conduct child-welfare investigations are properly educated and trained about the history and impacts of residential schools.iv. Ensuring that social workers and others who conduct child-welfare investigations are properly educated and trained about the potential for Aboriginal communities and families to provide for Aboriginal communities and families to provide more appropriate solutions to family healing.v. Requiring that all child-welfare decision makers consider the impact of the residential school experience on children and their caregivers.2. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with the provinces and territories, to prepare and publish annual reports on the number of Aboriginal children (First Nations, Inuit and Metis) who are in care, compared with non-Aboriginal children, as well as the reasons for apprehension, the total spending on preventive and care services by child-welfare agencies and the effectiveness of various interventions.3. We call upon all levels of government to fully implement Jordan’s Principle.4. We call upon the federal government to enact Aboriginal child-welfare legislation that establishes national standards for Aboriginal child apprehension and custody cases and includes principles that:i. Affirm the right of Aboriginal governments to establish and maintain their own child-welfare agencies.ii. Require all child-welfare agencies and courts to take the residential school legacy into account in their decision making.iii. Establish, as an important priority, a requirement that placements of Aboriginal children into temporary and permanent care be culturally appropriate.5. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to develop culturally appropriate parenting programs for Aboriginal families.Education6. We call upon the Government of Canada to repeal Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada.7. We call upon the federal government to develop with Aboriginal groups a joint strategy to eliminate education and employment gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians.8. We call upon the federal government to eliminate the discrepancy in federal education funding for First nations children being educated on reserves and those First Nations children being educated off reserves.9. We call upon the federal government to prepare and publish annual reports comparing funding for the education of First Nations children on and off reserves, as well as educational and income attainments of Aboriginal peoples in Canada compared with non-Aboriginal people.10. We call upon the federal government to draft new Aboriginal education legislation with the full participation and informed consent of Aboriginal peoples. The new legislation would include a commitment to sufficient funding and would incorporate the following principles:i. Providing sufficient funding to close identified educational achievement gaps within one generation.ii. Improving education attainment levels and success rates.iii. Developing culturally appropriate curricula.iv. Protecting the rights to Aboriginal languages including the teaching of Aboriginal languages as credit courses.v. Enabling parental and community responsibility, control, and accountability, similar to what parents enjoy in public school systems.vi. Enabling parents to fully participate in the education of their children.vii. Respecting and honouring Treaty relationships.11. We call upon the federal government to provide adequate funding to end the backlog of First nations students seeking a post-secondary education.12. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial, and Aboriginal governments to develop culturally appropriate early childhood education programs for Aboriginal families.Language and Culture13. We call upon the federal government to acknowledge that Aboriginal rights include Aboriginal language rights.14. We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles:i. Aboriginal languages are fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them.ii. Aboriginal language rights are reinforced by the Treaties.iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal language revitalization and preservation.iv. The preservation, revitalization, and strengthening of Aboriginal languages and cultures are best managed by Aboriginal people and communities.v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages.15. We call upon the federal government to appoint, in consultation with Aboriginal groups, an Aboriginal Languages Commissioner. The Commissioner should help promote Aboriginal languages and report on the adequacy of federal funding of Aboriginal languages initiatives.16. We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal Languages.17. We call upon all levels of governments to enable residential school survivors and their families to reclaim names changed by the residential school system by waiving administrative costs for a period of five years for the name change process and the revision of official identity documents, such as birth certificates, passports, driver’s licenses, health cards, status cards, and social insurance numbers.Health18. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial and Aboriginal governments to acknowledge that the current state of Aboriginal health in Canada is a direct result of previous Canadian government policies, including residential schools, and to recognize and implement the heath care rights of Aboriginal people as identified in international law, constitutional law and under the Treaties.19. We call upon the federal government in consultation with Aboriginal peoples, to establish measurable goals to identify and close the gaps in health outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities, and to publish annual progress reports and assess long-term trends. Such efforts would focus on indicators such as: infant mortality, maternal health, suicide, mental health, addictions, life expectancy, birth rates, infant and child health issues, chronic diseases, illness and injury incidence, and the availability of appropriate health services.20. In order to address the jurisdictional disputes concerning Aboriginal people who do not reside on reserves, we call upon the federal government to recognize, respect, and address the distinct health needs of the Metis, Inuit and off reserve Aboriginal peoples.21. We call upon the federal government to provide sustainable funding for existing and new Aboriginal healing centres to address the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual harms caused by residential schools, and to ensure that the funding of healing centres in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories is a priority.22. We call upon those who can effect change within the Canadian health-care system to recognize the value of Aboriginal healing practices and use them in the treatment of Aboriginal patients in collaboration with Aboriginal healers and Elders where requested by Aboriginal patients.23. We call upon all levels of government to:i. Increase the number of Aboriginal professionals working in the health care field.ii. Ensure the retention of Aboriginal health care providers in Aboriginal communities.iii. Provide cultural competency training for all health care professionals.24. We call upon medical and nursing schools in Canada to require all students to take a course dealing with Aboriginal health issues, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, and Indigenous teachings and practices. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism.Justice25. We call upon the federal government to establish a written policy that reaffirms the independence of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to investigate crimes in which the government has its own interest as a potential or real party in civil litigation.26. We call upon the federal, provincial and territorial government to review and amend their respective statues of limitations to ensure that they conform to the principle that government and other entities cannot rely on limitation defences to defend legal actions of historical abuse brought by Aboriginal people.27. We call upon the Federation of Law Societies of Canada to ensure that lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal-Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.28. We call upon law schools in Canada to require all law students to take a course in Aboriginal people and the law, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal-Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.29. We call upon the parties and, in particular, the federal government to work collaboratively with plaintiffs not included in the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to have disputed legal issues determined expeditiously on an agreed set of facts.30. We call upon federal, provincial, and territorial governments to commit to eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in custody over the next decade and to issue detailed annual reports that monitor and evaluate progress in doing so.31. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide sufficient and stable funding to implement and evaluate community sanctions that will provide realistic alternatives to imprisonment for Aboriginal offenders and respond to the underlying causes of offending.32. We call upon the federal government to amend the Criminal Code to allow trial judges, upon giving reasons, to depart from mandatory minimum sentences and restrictions on the use of conditional sentences.33. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to recognize as a high priority the need to address and prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and to develop, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, FASD preventive programs that can be delivered in a culturally appropriate manner.34. We call upon the government of Canada, the provinces, and territories to undertake reforms to the criminal justice system to better address the needs of offenders with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) including:i. Providing increased community resources and powers for courts to ensure that FASD is properly diagnosed, and that appropriate community supports are in place for those FASD.ii. Enacting statutory exemptions from mandatory minimum sentences of imprisonment for offenders affected by FASD.iii. Providing community, correctional, and parole resources to maximize the ability of people with FASD to live in the community.iv. Adopting appropriate evaluation mechanisms to measure the effectiveness of such programs and ensure community safety.35. We call upon the federal government to eliminate barriers to the creation of additional Aboriginal healing lodges within the federal correctional system.36. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to work with Aboriginal communities to provide culturally relevant services to inmates on issues such as substance abuse, family and domestic violence, and overcoming the experience of having been sexually abused.37. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to provide more supports for Aboriginal programming in halfway houses and parole services.38. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial and Aboriginal governments to commit to eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal youth in custody over the next decade.39. We call upon the federal government to develop a national plan to collect and publish data on the criminal victimization of Aboriginal people, including data related to homicide and family violence victimization.40. We call on all levels of government, in collaboration with Aboriginal people, to create adequately funded and accessible Aboriginal-specific victim programs and services with appropriate evaluation mechanisms.41. We call upon the federal government, in consultation with Aboriginal organizations, to appoint a public inquiry into the causes of, and remedies for, the disproportionate victimization of Aboriginal women and girls. The inquiry’s mandate would include:i. Investigation into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls.ii. Links to the intergenerational legacy of residential schools.42. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments to commit to the recognition and implementation of Aboriginal justice systems in a manner consistent with the Treaty and Aboriginal rights of Aboriginal peoples, the Constitution Act, 1982, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, endorsed by Canada in November 2012.ReconciliationCanadian Governments and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People43. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial and municipal governments to fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.44. We call upon the Government of Canada to develop a national action plan, strategies, and other concrete measures to achieve the goals of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Royal Proclamation and Covenant of Reconciliation45. We call upon the Government of Canada, on behalf of all Canadians, to jointly develop with Aboriginal peoples a Royal Proclamation of Reconciliation to be issued by the Crown. The proclamation would build on the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Treaty of Niagara of 1764, and reaffirm the nation to nation relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown. The proclamation would include, but not be limited to the following commitments:i. Repudiate concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius.ii. Adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.iii. Renew or establish Treaty relationships based on principles of mutual recognition, mutual respect, and shared responsibility for maintaining those relationships into the future.iv. Reconcile Aboriginal and Crown constitutional and legal orders to ensure that Aboriginal peoples are full partners in Confederation, including the recognition and integration of Indigenous laws and legal traditions in negotiations and implementation processes involving Treaties, land claims, and other constructive agreements.46. We call upon the parties to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to develop and sign a Covenant of Reconciliation that would identify principles for working collaboratively to advance reconciliation in Canadian society, and that would include, but not be limited to:i. Reaffirmation of the parties’ commitment to reconciliation.ii. Repudiation of concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples, such as the Doctrine of Discover and terra nullius, and the reformation of laws, governance structures, and policies within their respective institutions that continue to rely on such concepts.iii. Full adoption and implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the framework for reconciliation.iv. Support for the renewal or establishment of Treaty relationships based on principles of mutual recognition, mutual respect, and shared responsibility for maintaining those relationships into the future.v. Enabling those excluded from the Settlement Agreement to sign onto the Covenant of Reconciliation.vi. Enabling additional parties to sign onto the Covenant of Reconciliation.47. We call upon the federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments to repudiate concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous peoples and lands, such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius, and to reform those laws, government policies, and litigation strategies that continue to rely on such concepts.Settlement Agreement Parties and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.48. We call upon the church parties to the Settlement Agreement, and all other faith groups and interfaith social justice groups in Canada who have not already done so, to formally adopt and comply with the principles, norms and standards of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework for reconciliation. This would include, but not be limited to, the following commitments:i. Ensuring that their institutions, policies, programs, and practices comply with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.ii. Respecting Indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination in spiritual matters, including the right to practice, develop, and teach their own spiritual and religious traditions, customs, and ceremonies, consistent with Article 12:1 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.iii. Engaging in ongoing public dialogue and actions to support the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.iv. Issuing a statement no later than March 31, 2016, from all religious denominations and faith groups, as to how they will implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.49. We call upon all religious denominations and faith groups who have not already done so to repudiate concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples, such as the Doctrine of Discovery and terra nullius.Equity for Aboriginal People in the Legal System50. In keeping with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, we call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal organizations, to fund the establishment of Indigenous law institutes for the development, use, and understanding of Indigenous law and access to justice in accordance with the unique cultures of Aboriginal peoples in Canada.51. We call upon the Government of Canada, as an obligation of its fiduciary responsibility, to develop a policy of transparency by publishing legal opinions it develops and upon which is acts or intends to act, in regard to the scope and extent of Aboriginal and Treaty rights.52. We call upon the Government of Canada, provincial and territorial governments, and the courts to adopt the following legal principles:i. Aboriginal title claims are accepted once the Aboriginal claimant has established occupation over a particular territory at a particular point in time.ii. Once Aboriginal title has been established, the burden of proving any limitation on any rights arising from the existence of that title shifts to the party asserting such a limitation.National Council for Reconciliation53. We call upon the Parliament of Canada, in consultation and collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, to enact legislation to establish a National Council for Reconciliation. The legislation would establish the council as an independent, national, oversight body with membership jointly appointed by the Government of Canada and national Aboriginal organizations, and consisting of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal members. Its mandate would include, but not be limited to, the following:i. Monitor, evaluate, and report annually to Parliament and the people of Canada on the Government of Canada’s post-apology progress on reconciliation to ensure that government accountability for reconciling the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown is maintained in the coming years.ii. Monitor, evaluate, and report to Parliament and the people of Canada on reconciliation progress across all levels and sectors of Canadian society, including the implementation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action.iii. Develop and implement a multi-year National Action Plan for Reconciliation, which includes research and policy development, public education programs, and resources.iv. Promote public dialogues, public/private partnerships, and public initiatives for reconciliation.54. We call upon the Government of Canada to provide multi-year funding for the National Council of Reconciliation to ensure that it has the financial, human, and technical resources required to conduct its work, including the endowment of a National Reconciliation Trust to advance the case of reconciliation.55. We call upon all levels of government to provide annual reports or any current data requested by the National Council for Reconciliation so that it can report on the progress towards reconciliation. The reports or data would include, but not be limited to:i. The number of Aboriginal children-including Metis and Inuit children – in care compared with non-Aboriginal children, the reasons for apprehension, and the total spending on preventive and care services by child-welfare agencies.ii. Comparative funding for the education of First Nations students on and off reserves.iii. The educational and income of attainments of Aboriginal peoples in Canada compared with non-Aboriginal people.iv. Progress on closing the gaps between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in a number of health indicators such as: infant mortality, maternal health, suicide, mental health, addictions, life expectancy, birth rates, infant and child health issues, chronic diseases, illness and injury incidence, and the availability of appropriate health services.v. Progress on eliminating the overrepresentation of Aboriginal children in youth custody over the next decade.vi. Progress on reducing the rate of criminal victimization of Aboriginal people, including data related to homicide and family violence victimization and other crimes.vii. Progress on reducing the overrepresentation of Aboriginal people in the justice and correctional systems.56. We call upon the prime minister of Canada to formally respond to the report of the National Council for Reconciliation by issuing an annual “state of Aboriginal Peoples” report, which would outline the government’s plans for advancing the cause of reconciliation.Professional Development and Training for Public Servants57. We call upon federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments to provide education to public servants on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal -Crown relations. This will required skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-racism.Church Apologies and Reconciliation58. We call upon the Pope to issue an apology to Survivors, their families, and communities for the Roman Catholic Church’s role in the spiritual, cultural, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse of First Nations, Inuit, and Metis children in Catholic-run residential schools. We call for that apology to be similar to the 2010 apology issued to Irish victims of abuse and to occur within one year of the issuing of this Report and to be delivered by the Pope in Canada.59. We call upon church parties to the Settlement Agreement to develop ongoing education strategies to ensure that their respective congregations learn about their church’s role in colonization, the history and legacy of residential schools, and why apologies to former residential school students, their families, and communities were necessary.60. We call upon leaders of the church parties to the Settlement Agreement and all other faiths, in collaboration with Indigenous spiritual leaders, Survivors, schools of theology, seminaries, and other religious training centres, to develop and teach curriculum for all student clergy, and clergy and staff who work in Aboriginal communities, on the need to respect Indigenous spirituality in its own rights, the history and legacy of residential schools and the role of the church parties in that system, the history and legacy of religious conflict in Aboriginal families and communities, and the responsibility that churches have to mitigate such conflicts and prevent spiritual violence.61. We call upon church parties to the Settlement Agreement, in collaboration with Survivors and representatives of Aboriginal organizations, to establish permanent funding to Aboriginal people for:i. Community-controlled healing and reconciliation projects.ii. Community-controlled culture-and language revitalization projects.iii. Community -controlled education and relationship building projects.iv. Regional dialogues for Indigenous spiritual leaders and youth to discuss Indigenous spirituality, self-determination, and reconciliation.Education For Reconciliation62. We call upon the federal, provincial, and territorial governments, in consultation and collaboration with Survivors, Aboriginal peoples and educators to:i. Make age-appropriate curriculum on residential schools, Treaties, and Aboriginal peoples’ historical and contemporary contributions to Canada a mandatory education requirement for Kindergarten to Grade Twelve students.ii. Provide the necessary funding to post-secondary institutions to educate teachers on how to integrate Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods into classrooms.iii. Provide the necessary funding to Aboriginal schools to utilize Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods in classrooms.iv. Establish senior-level positions in government at the assistant deputy minister level or higher dedicated to Aboriginal content in education.63. We call upon the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada to maintain an annual commitment to Aboriginal education issues including:i. Developing and implementing Kindergarten to Grade Twelve curriculum and learning resources on Aboriginal peoples in Canadian history, and the history and legacy of residential schools.ii. Sharing information and best practices on teaching curriculum related to residential schools and Aboriginal history.iii. Building student capacity for intercultural understanding, empathy, and mutual respect.iv. Identifying teacher-training needs relating to the above.64. We call upon all levels of government that provide public funds to denominational schools to required such schools to provide and education on comparative religious studies, which must include a segment on Aboriginal spiritual beliefs and practices developed in collaboration with Aboriginal Elders.65. We call upon the federal government, through the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, post-secondary institutions and educators, and the National Centre of Truth and Reconciliation and its partner institutions, to establish a national research program with multi-year funding to advance understanding of reconciliation.Youth Programs66. We call upon the federal government to establish multi-year funding of community-based youth organizations to deliver programs on reconciliation, and establish a national network to share information and best practices.Museums and Archives67. We call upon the federal government to provide funding to the Canadian Museums Association to undertake, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, a national review of museum policies and best practices to determine the level of compliance with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and to make recommendations.68. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, and the Canadian Museums Association to mark the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation in 2017 by establishing a dedicated national funding program for commemoration projects on the theme of reconciliation.69. We call upon Library and Archives Canada to:i. Fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations   Joinet-Orentlicher Principles, as related to Aboriginal peoples’ inalienable right to know the truth about what happened and why, with regard to human rights violations committed against them in residential schools.ii. Ensure that its record holdings related to residential schools are accessible to the public.iii. Commit more resources to its public education materials and programming on residential schools.70. We call upon the federal government to provide funding to the Canadian Association of Archivists to undertake, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, a national review of archival policies and best practices to:i. Determine the level of compliance with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations Joinet-Orentlicher Principles, as related to Aboriginal peoples’ inalienable right to know the truth about what happened and why, with regard to human rights violations committed against them in residential schools.ii. Produce a report with recommendations for full implementation of these international mechanisms as a reconciliation framework for Canadian archives.Missing Children and Burial Information71. We call upon all chief coroners and provincial vital statistics agencies that have not provided to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada their records on the deaths of Aboriginal children in the care of residential school authorities to make these documents available to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.72. We call upon the federal government to allocate sufficient resources to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation to allow it to develop and maintain the National Residential School Student Death Registry established by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.73. We call upon the federal government to work with churches, Aboriginal communities and former residential schools students to establish and maintain an online registry of residential school cemeteries, including where possible, plot maps showing the location of deceased residential school children.74. We call upon the federal government to work with the churches and Aboriginal community leaders to inform the families of children who died at residential schools of the child’s burial location, and to respond to families wishes for appropriate commemoration ceremonies and markers, and reburial in home communities where requested.75. We call upon the federal government to work with provincial, territorial, and municipal government, churches, Aboriginal communities, former residential school students, and current landowners to develop and implement strategies and procedures for the ongoing identification, documentation, maintenances, commemoration, and protection of residential school cemeteries or other sites at which residential school children were buried. This is to include the provision of appropriate memorial ceremonies and commemorative markers to honour the deceased children.76. We call upon the parties engaged in the work of documenting, maintaining, commemorating, and protecting residential school cemeteries to adopt strategies in accordance with the following principles:i. The Aboriginal community most affected shall lead the development of such strategies.ii. Information shall be sought from residential school Survivors and other Knowledge Keepers in the development of such strategies.iii. Aboriginal protocols shall be respected before any potentially invasive technical inspection and investigation of a cemetery site.National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation77. We call upon provincial, territorial, municipal, and community archives to work collaboratively with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation to identify and collect copies of all records relevant to the history and legacy of the residential school system, and to provide these to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.78. We call upon the Government of Canada to commit to making a funding contribution of $10 million over seven years to the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, plus an additional amount to assist communities to research and produce histories of their own residential school experience and their involvement in truth, healing, and reconciliation.Commemoration79. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Survivors, Aboriginal organizations, and the arts community, to develop a reconciliation framework for Canadian heritage and commemoration. This would include, but no be limited to:i. Amending the Historic Sites and Monuments Act to include First Nations, Inuit, and Metis representation on the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada and is Secretariat.ii. Revising the policies, criteria, and practices of the National Program of Historical Commemoration to integrate Indigenous history, heritage values, and memory practices into Canada’s national heritage and history.iii. Developing and implementing a national heritage plan and strategy for commemorating residential school sites, the history and legacy of residential schools, and the contributions of Aboriginal peoples to Canada’s history.80. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, to establish, as a statutory holiday, a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation to honour Survivors, their families, and communities, and ensure that public commemoration of the history and legacy of residential schools remains a vital component.81. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Survivors and their organizations, and other parties to the Settlement Agreement, to commission and install a publicly accessible, highly visible, Residential Schools National Monument in the city of Ottawa to honour Survivors and all the children who were lost to their families and communities.82. We call upon provincial and territorial government, in collaboration with Survivors and their organizations, and other parties to the Settlement Agreement, to commission and install a publicly accessible, highly visible, Residential Schools Monument in each capital city to honour Survivors and all the children who were lost to their families and communities.83. We call upon the Canada Council for the Arts to establish, as a funding priority, a strategy for Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists to undertake collaborative projects and produce works that contribute to the reconciliation process.Media and Reconciliation84. We call upon the federal government to restore and increase funding to the CBC/Radio-Canada, to enable Canada’s national public broadcaster to support reconciliation, and be properly reflective of the diverse cultures, languages, and perspectives of Aboriginal peoples, including but not limited to:i. Increasing Aboriginal programming, including Aboriginal-language speakers.ii. Increasing equitable access for Aboriginal peoples to jobs, leadership positions, and professional development opportunities within the organization.iii. Continuing to provide dedicated news coverage and online public information resources on issues of concern to Aboriginal peoples and all Canadians, including the history and legacy of residential schools and the reconciliation process.85. We call upon the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, as an independent non-profit broadcaster with programming by, for, and about Aboriginal peoples, to support reconciliation, including but not limited to:i. Continuing to provide leadership in programming and organizational culture that reflects the diverse cultures, languages, and perspectives of Aboriginal peoples.ii. Continuing to develop media initiatives that inform and educate the Canadian public and connect Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians.86. We call upon Canadian journalism programs and media schools to require education for all students on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal-Crown relations.Sports Reconciliation87. We call upon all levels of government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, sports halls of fame, and other relevant organizations, to provide public education that tells the national story of Aboriginal athletes in history.88. We call upon all levels of government to take action to ensure long-term Aboriginal athlete development and growth, and continued support for the North American Indigenous Games, including funding to host the games and for provincial and territorial team preparation and travel.89. We call upon the federal government to amend the Physical Activity and Sport Act to support reconciliation by ensuring that policies to promote physical activity as a fundamental element of health and well-being, reduce barriers to sports participation, increase the pursuit of excellence in sport, and build capacity in the Canadian sport system, are inclusive of Aboriginal peoples.90. We call upon the federal government to ensure that national sports policies, programs, and initiatives are inclusive of Aboriginal peoples, including but not limited to establishing:i. In collaboration with provincial and territorial governments, stable funding for, and access to, community sports programs that reflect the diverse cultures and traditional sporting activities of Aboriginal peoples.ii. An elite athlete development program for Aboriginal athletes.iii. Programs for coaches, trainers, and sports officials that are culturally relevant for Aboriginal peoples.iv. Anti-racism awareness and training programs.91. We call upon the officials and host countries of international sporting events such as the Olympics, Pan Am, and Commonwealth games to ensure that Indigenous peoples’ territorial protocols are respected, and local indigenous communities are engaged in all aspects of planning and participating in such events.Business and Reconciliation92. We call upon the corporate sector in Canada to adopt the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a reconciliation framework and to apply its principles, norms, and standards to corporate policy and core operational activities involving Indigenous peoples and their lands and resources. This would include, but not be limited to the following:i. Commit to meaningful consultation, building respectful relationships, and obtaining the free, prior, and informed consent of Indigenous peoples before proceeding with economic development projects.ii. Ensure that Aboriginal peoples have equitable access to jobs, training, and education opportunities in the corporate sector, and that Aboriginal communities gain long-term sustainable benefits from economic development projects.iii. Provide education for management and staff on the history of Aboriginal peoples, including the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal-Crown relations. This will require skills based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.Newcomers to Canada93. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with the national Aboriginal organizations, to revise the information kit for newcomers to Canada and its citizenship test to reflect a more inclusive history of the diverse Aboriginal peoples of Canada, including information about the Treaties and history of residential schools.94. We call upon the Government of Canada to replace the Oath of Citizenship with the following:I swear (or affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, Her Heirs and Successors, and that I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada including Treaties with Indigenous Peoples, and fulfill my duties as a Canadian citizen.last_img read more

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Oral history to be vetted at upcoming energy hearing in Quebec

first_imgtfennario@aptn.ca APTN National NewsFor the next month, First Nation peoples from across the country will have the ear of the National Energy Board.The board is holding oral traditional evidence sessions for communities that will be effected by the proposed Energy East pipeline.But many have expressed their displeasure with the limitations placed on what they can and can’t say.APTN’s Tom Fennario reports.last_img

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Russ Diabo skips AFN debate to visit with Tiny House Warriors in BC

first_imgWith files from Lucy Scholey. Justin BrakeAPTN NewsArriving at dusk on Wednesday evening, Russ Diabo strolled into the Tiny House Warriors village in Blue River, B.C., where he was greeted warmly by land defenders and water protectors.Nearly 2,000 kilometres away north of Winnipeg there was an Assembly of First Nations debate for the five candidates running for national chief, including Diabo.But the First Nations policy analyst from Kahnawake would rather be with the grassroots people fighting for something he has spent his lifetime warning people about.The Tiny House Warriors are led by Kanahus Manuel, daughter of Diabo’s longtime comrade, former chief and Indigenous rights ambassador the late Arthur Manuel.They’ve established themselves next to a planned Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project worker’s accommodations complex in the tiny tourist town.Speaking to APTN News after his arrival, Diabo said seeing Facebook footage of Manuel’s arrest last Saturday as she and other land defenders occupied a B.C. provincial park compelled him to make the trip.He said he supports the Tiny House Warriors’ effort in “bringing attention to the need to stop this project and make sure it’s never built.”Tiny House Warriors highlight broader fight for Indigenous rights and titleHe also said the Secwepemc-led fight against the pipeline is “directly connected” to the issue of Aboriginal rights, title and jurisdiction because the Secwepemc have “never ceded or surrendered their land.“It is Aboriginal title territory, and the people who hold that title are the community people themselves: the families and the communities that make up the nation.”(AFN National Chief candidate Russell Diabo (centre) visited the Tiny House Warriors at their recently established village in Blue River, B.C. on Wednesday evening. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)A longtime advocate for Indigenous rights with decades of experience in land defence movements,  including Oka, Barrier Lake, Gustafsen Lake and Wounded Knee, Diabo warns that Indigenous people in Canada are at a pivotal moment with the Trudeau government’s Recognition and Implementation Rights Framework legislation on the way.The feds have vowed to do away with the Indian Act and end Canada’s comprehensive land claims policies.Federal Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett has touted the impending legislation as “critical to reconciliation,” while Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said it will “chart a new way forward for our Government to work with First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Peoples and…undo decades of mistrust, poverty, broken promises, and injustices.”But Diabo says based on all indications so far, Canada is still working to “extinguish Aboriginal title” in a more covert way than Trudeau’s father, late Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, attempted to do with the Liberals’ 1969 White Paper.“They’ve taken a top-down approach, signing these memorandums of understandings with the Assembly of First Nations on fiscal relations, on shared priorities,” he said.“But even though they did that they went ahead and unilaterally issued 10 principles on Indigenous relationships last year, which are basically preconditions [that are] reinforcing the doctrine of discovery and the Constitution Act 1867, which means the existing constitutional framework of the federal and provincial governments. They’re not recognizing any Indigenous jurisdiction.”Despite supreme court rulings like Delgamuukw and Tsilhqot’in, which recognize Aboriginal title to unceded lands, Ottawa is “still maintaining their extinguishment approach under this modern treaty process,” Diabo said.“And this effort by the Tiny House Warriors is a good way to bring attention…to the fact that the prime minister’s ignoring their Aboriginal title and pushing this project through.”Division within the Secwepemc NationFour of the 17 Secwepemc bands established by Canada under the Indian Act have signed agreements with Trans Mountain proponent Kinder Morgan, including Simpcw First Nation—formerly the North Thompson Indian Band—the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc in Kamloops, the Canim Lake Band, and Pellt’iq’t First Nation .In May 2016 Kinder Morgan announced it reached a deal with Simpcw First Nation—formerly North Thompson Indian Band—over the section of the pipeline running through its territory as defined under the Indian Act.“The agreement represents a real partnership – we will play an active role in all aspects of the Project within our Territory, from environmental stewardship to benefiting economically,” former Chief Nathan Matthew said at the time.Responding to resistance within the wider Secwepemc Nation, Simpcw issued a press release last May.In it, Matthew said one-third of the pipeline running through Secwepemcel’ucw is on Simpcw territory, and that “no other nation or organization (First Nation or environmental) has the authority to speak on Simpcw’s behalf.”But Diabo challenges the legal and moral legitimacy of the former Simpcw chief’s claims.“I know for a fact that this is not the exclusive territory of the North Thompson Indian band,” he told APTN Wednesday. “Secwepemc people have always harvested and used their territory because it’s such a diverse ecosystem.”In 1996 Diabo was hired to lead a three-year traditional use study for the Neskonlith and Adams Lake bands that showed Secwepemc “roamed all over-harvesting and gathering food and materials throughout the territory,” he said.“So for one modern Indian Act band to say people from other bands can’t be in the area I think doesn’t stand up to the history and culture and land tenure of the Secwepemc that I’ve seen documented.”APTN reached out to current Simpcw Chief Shelly Loring but did not receive a response by the time of publication.Protecting others in a time of divide and conquerLast spring April Thomas, a member of the Canim Lake Band, told APTN at a Secwepemc-led protest against the pipeline that Canadian laws that draw boundaries between communities within wider Indigenous nations are “just another divide and conquer tactic that’s been used on our people over and over again.“We have a housing crisis, a poverty crisis and they’ve made our people so desperate that they feel like they’re obligated to sign these agreements because they think that’s all they’re going to get.”(Kanahus Manuel at the Tiny House Warriors village in B.C. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)Earlier this week Kanahus Manuel told APTN the Secwepemc have a responsibility to not only their own people but those of neighbouring nations.“We are mountain people,” she said, explaining their land, Secwepemcul’ecw, “is the land of spilling waters.”Manuel said the waters that feed the Fraser, North Thompson and Columbia Rivers “all form in our mountains in Secwepemcul’ecw, so we have a very important job and responsibility, not just to us but to all the Indigenous people that still depend on the salmon.”Diabo, who also skipped the first AFN leaders’ debate in the Yukon in part to be with those at the Justice For Our Stolen Children camp in Regina, said whether he wins the July 25 AFN election for national chief or not, he will stand with the Tiny House Warriors and others fighting the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.“I’m going to be doing as much as I can to help and encourage and support them.”jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenewslast_img read more

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Chiefs of Ontario call on Canada to do a hard reset on

first_img(Regional Chief RoseAnne Archibald at the Assembly of First Nations forum on rights in Gatineau. Photo: Justin Brake/APTN)APTN NewsOntario’s regional chief RoseAnne Archibald is calling on the federal government to reset negotiations aimed at producing legislation that would enshrine Indigenous rights into law.“The federal government continues to advance a deeply flawed engagement process concerning the Rights and Recognition Framework after significant resistance from not only Indigenous legal and cultural experts, but First Nations from across Canada,” said Archibald in a statement released Wednesday morning.Archibald and other chiefs are meeting in Gatineau, Que., across the river from Ottawa at a  forum hosted by the Assembly of First Nations forum called First Nations Rights, Title and Jurisdiction.Canada is currently working on the Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework.The Crown-Indigenous Relations ministry is hosting a number of negotiating tables to get input from Indigenous communities across the country.But many feel that the Trudeau government is taking a top down approach and any legislation should be drafted by communities themselves.Others believe the ultimate goal of the legislation is to extinguish Indigenous rights entirely.On Tuesday, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations Carolyn Bennett spoke at the forum. The main subject of her speech was the framework where she tried to quell fears the government is aiming to write it alone and extinguish rights.The statement released by the Chiefs of Ontario acknowledged that on other issues “we have made positive forward movement with the federal government.” But that “it’s troubling that while they are listening, they aren’t hearing First Nation voices.”At an assembly in June where Archibald was elected regional chief, the chiefs also voted in favour of a resolution to reject the framework.“We continue to encourage like-minded First Nations to assert their sovereignty through their own nation to nation governance structure processes,” the statement said.news@aptn.ca@aptnnewslast_img read more

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Kahnawake youth are learning to code

first_imgtfennario@aptn.ca@tfennario Tom FennarioAPTN NewsIndigenous people are not entering the technology workforce at the same rate as Canadians.But one community south of Montreal is aiming to change that.By offering the young people of Kahnawake Mohawk territory an opportunity to learn about data and artificial intelligence.last_img

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Plate fight is over Saskatchewan ends ban on Alberta plates at its

first_imgEDMONTON – Saskatchewan — facing a free trade probe and potential multimillion-dollar fines for banning Alberta licence plates — reversed course Monday, labelling its about-face a triumph.Saskatchewan Trade Minister Steven Bonk said the province is immediately ending a policy it imposed in December that banned vehicles with Alberta licence plates on government construction projects.Bonk said they were doing so because Alberta Economic Development Minister Deron Bilous told reporters last week his province would abide by a pending panel ruling on a separate free-trade issue surrounding support for Alberta micro-brewers.“Since they’ve backed down, we’ve decided to completely back down,” Bonk said in Regina.“It’s absolutely a victory for Saskatchewan.”Alberta officials have never said publicly they would not abide by the upcoming appeal ruling on the Agreement on Internal Trade over whether recent tax changes and subsidies for Alberta craft brewers violate interprovincial free-trade rules.Bonk said they believed Alberta wouldn’t abide by it.“That was definitely inferred,” he said. “We’ve heard them say that they will not back down.”Speaking to reporters in Edmonton, Bilous dismissed Bonk’s accusations that Alberta wouldn’t abide by any ruling on beer, which is expected as early as February“Is Bonk making this up to save face?” Bilous was asked.“Absolutely,” he replied.Bilous said the real reason Bonk reversed course was because Monday was the deadline to walk back the policy or face an arbitration panel investigation, and potentially $5 million in fines, for contravening free-trade rules under the New West Partnership trade agreement.“When you’re wrong, you’re wrong,” said Bilous.“(Saskatchewan Premier) Brad Wall waited until the 11th hour to do the right thing.”When Saskatchewan imposed the ban Dec. 6, it was not about beer but workplace fairness.Saskatchewan officials at that time said the licence plate ban was in response to similar restrictions facing Saskatchewan workers on Alberta job sites. Alberta said that was not true and Bonk has never provided evidence to back up the claim.As the war of words escalated, Wall stepped in and said the plate ban was in response to anti-free-trade initiatives by Alberta, including the beer dispute.Alberta then filed a legal challenge under the New West deal, leading to Monday’s deadline.Carla Beck, the Saskatchewan opposition NDP deputy house leader, said it’s been clear from the beginning that the governing Saskatchewan Party had no justification.“Now, even after backing down, they’re still playing games. We should be able to expect better from our government,” Beck said.Both sides also agreed in December to meet in Lloydminster — on the boundary between the two provinces — to hash out trade concerns.The two sides still want to meet and have set a date of Jan. 31. But Saskatchewan wants to hold it in Medicine Hat, Alta., which is closer to Regina, while Alberta insists on Lloydminster.It’s the second time in 10 months that Wall’s government has walked back on free-trade incursions into Alberta.Last March, Wall sent letters to oil companies in Calgary. He offered incentives such as relocation costs and help finding office space if firms would move to Saskatchewan.After Alberta Premier Rachel Notley threatened to take the issue to arbitration as a violation of free-trade rules — and hinted at retaliatory measures — Wall’s government sent followup letters to the oil companies stressing the province couldn’t violate trade agreements.The ongoing spat underscores the bad blood between Notley and Wall, particularly as it relates to rehabilitating their non-renewable, resource-based economies.As late as last week, Wall and Notley were publicly sniping at each other. Wall has criticized Notley’s decision to rack up debt and deficits to help revive Alberta’s finances, while Notley says Wall’s austerity budgets have made a bad situation worse in his province.Wall is leaving politics, however, and Saskatchewan Party members are to pick a new leader — and premier — on Saturday.last_img read more

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