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Democrats Tab Jamestown Native To Challenge Goodell For Office

first_imgAssemblyman Goodell debates the one-house budget resolution on the Assembly Floor in 2011. Image courtesy: NYAssembly.gov.JAMESTOWN – Local Democrats have selected Christina Cardinale, a Jamestown sales and marketing professional, to challenge Assemblyman Andy Goodell for the state’s 150th assembly seat.Chautauqua County Democratic Committee Chair Norm Green said that the party filed its paperwork Monday officially naming Cardinale as the party choice.“Christina Cardinale will be making her own official announcement shortly,” said Green. “She is an impressive candidate and I am convinced she will run a dynamic campaign in what will be an interesting election year with the pandemic.”The 2020 Democratic ballot for Chautauqua County voters will include president/vice president; Tracy Mitrano, NY23 Congress; Frank Puglisi, 57th State Senate; Christina Cardinale, 150th NY Assembly; Richard Morrisroe, County Executive Vacancy; District Attorney Patrick Swanson; Philp Collier, District 1 County Legislature Vacancy; and Zachery Agett, County Legislature District 10 Vacancy. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Memphis Star Beverley Knight on Her Surprise Olivier Nomination

first_img Do you feel a sense of community with your fellow nominees? Hell yes! Everybody is already on everyone else’s Twitter saying good luck and there is a real community here in theaterland, which you don’t get at all in the music industry, quite frankly. Tell us the truth: have you been practicing an acceptance speech? To be honest with you, I haven’t because I keep thinking I’m going to jinx it. These women I’m up against are proper, and here I am having come in from the music world: I sing, that’s what I do. Let’s just say that if it were to be my name that they called out, the first 20 seconds of my remarks would be absolute rubbish and then I would settle down and maybe get in the proper and appropriate thank yous. How then did you actually get the news? We finished breakfast and James was looking through his phone and he had gone on to the Oliviers website and he looked at the phone and he looked at me and in the end he just smiled. He read out the headlines and mine was the last name and when he read it out, I went crazy and burst into tears. English soul singer Beverley Knight has been batting a thousand in her stage forays to date. She first appeared on the West End in 2013 as Heather Headley’s replacement in The Bodyguard and is currently an Olivier Award nominee for her roof-raising turn as Felicia in the British premiere of Memphis at the Shaftesbury Theatre; the London version of Broadway’s 2010 Tony-winning musical is up for nine Oliviers in total. The chatty, ever-engaging star spoke with Broadway.com about her newfound love for theater, cornering the American market on stage, and where she was when she got the big news. This is only your second-ever West End gig, and here you are an Olivier nominee! How exciting is that? It’s mad, isn’t it? The day the nominations came out I was on holiday with James [O’Keefe, her husband] and we were sitting at breakfast aware of what time it was back home and James said, “You know, it’s time,” and I said, “I don’t want to know, otherwise I will vomit this breakfast up,” so we made small chitchat about this and that and I was quite clearly antsy and nervous. In other words, you were letting research be your guide as opposed to a fellow performer. I guess I was a bit more bookish about it. What I did to prepare myself was not only get on a plane and go to the city of Memphis, but also read as much as I could about what happened after the Civil War—the Reconstruction era and so on. I wanted to get a sense of Felicia not only as we find her in the show but of her genealogy. But now that we’re up and running, I must get in contact with Montego; she’s just divine. As an Englishwoman from the Midlands, you’ve scooped some great American roles. Any others on the horizon? It’s interesting that the roles that seem to suit someone like me all seem to come from the states, which is a joyous thing because I’ve been trying to perfect an American accent ever since I was a kid [laughs]! You’ve got your Motown the Musical and that could be a lot of fun, and if they ever revive The Wiz, I’m in! And how do you feel about co-star Killian Donnelly, who plays Huey, also getting a nod? I’m praying to every god that exists that Killian walks away with that gong because I just adore the ground he walks on. But I’m so pleased that everyone has been recognized, because this has been such a team effort. It’s feeling now as if our hard work has paid off. It’s interesting that you were in the frame for Memphis in the West End before you ever took over in The Bodyguard. I had got the script for Memphis at the very beginning because the people involved were convinced I would be a good Felicia, which was lovely, so I was sent the script and had a read and I thought it was absolutely magnificent. Then I was on tour with my music when they were talking about the changeover in The Bodyguard and I thought that might be fun to do and because they hadn’t at the time gotten a theater for Memphis, I decided to take a punt on that instead. You are half of a mixed-race marriage—how does the musical’s material hit home for you? James is of Irish descent and proper Irish—dark Irish—as well, and we kept saying to one another with relation to this show that what seems so natural and organic and perfect for us would have been not just anathema but illegal had we lived only half a century ago. Which of your two West End roles has been the greater challenge: Rachel Marron or Felicia? Rachel was tougher to pull out every night from a physical point of view and I would go home just knackered because all the songs in that show are for that one character. With Memphis, the music is spread among the cast but this one has a weighty message with Jim Crow and the civil rights era coming through so that by the end of it emotionally, you’re dead; you put everything into it and then you’re just spent. View Comments How important was it for you to learn what Tony nominee Montego Glover had done with the same role on Broadway? That’s an interesting one. In complete contrast to Killian who was in contact with Chad [Kimball, his Broadway predecessor] the whole time, I tried to have as little as possible to do with what had happened on Broadway only because I didn’t want that to influence the way I was thinking and feeling.last_img read more

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Terrence Mann In, Kelsey Grammer Out, in Finding Neverland

first_img Related Shows Emmy winner Kelsey Grammer will not be flying back to Finding Neverland on the Great White Way after taking a hiatus from the production over the summer. Instead, three-time Tony nominee Terrence Mann will step in as American producer Charles Frohman from September 29, taking over for Anthony Warlow. The Broadway.com Audience Choice Award-winning tuner is playing at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre.It’ll be a busy few months for Mann, who is then booked to move with Neverland co-star Carolee Carmello to star in Tuck Everlasting on the Great White Way this coming spring. Mann earned Tony nominations for Pippin, Beauty and the Beast and Les Misérables. His additional Broadway credits include The Addams Family, Lennon, The Rocky Horror Show, The Scarlet Pimpernel, Getting Away With Murder, Jerome Robbins’ Broadway, Rags, Cats and Barnum.Directed by Diane Paulus and featuring a score by Gary Barlow and Eliot Kennedy and a book by James Graham, Finding Neverland follows the story of J.M. Barrie (Matthew Morrison) and his relationship with the family of widow Sylvia Llewelyn Davies (Laura Michelle Kelly). Llewelyn Davies’ children eventually became Barrie’s inspiration to write Peter Pan.Along with Morrison, Kelly, Warlow and Carmello, the cast also currently includes Teal Wicks, Casey Butler, Alex Dreier, Jackson Demott Hill, Noah Hinsdale, Christopher Paul Richards, Eli Tokash, Courtney Balan, Kristy Cates, Dana Costello, Colin Cunliffe, Rory Donovan, Chris Dwan, Francesca Granell, Kevin Kern, Josh Lamon, Nick McGough, Mary Page Nance, Emma Pfaeffle, Jonathan Ritter, Tyley Ross, Julius Anthony Rubio, Paul Slade Smith, Jaime Verazin, Ryan Worsing and Amy Yakima. Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 21, 2016 Finding Neverland View Commentslast_img read more

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Spring green-up

first_imgBy Gil Landry and Clint WaltzUniversity of GeorgiaWarm-season turfgrasses such as Bermuda, centipede, zoysia and St. Augustine suffer some common problems with springtime green-up. Here are the ones we see most often.Mowing height is the most common problem as these grasses go from dormancy to active growth. Scalping is more common in zoysia grasses, especially in the denser-growth cultivars like Emerald.Zoysia grasses don’t tolerate scalping as Bermuda will. As a rule, zoysia will be set back anytime it’s cut low enough that you can see the black mold under the leaf canopy. This is generally below the node of the growing leaves. It can occur at any mowing height from as low as 0.5 inches to more than 3 inches.Regardless of the grass species and normal mowing height, taking the grass down below the node will set it back. Generally, the higher the mowing height, the more this is a problem.Ideally, maintain Bermuda grass and centipede between 1 and 2 inches, zoysia from 0.5 to 2 inches and St. Augustine from 2 to 3 inches.Mowing frequency is just as important as mowing height. If you remove more than one-third of the leaf height at a single mowing, the grass will be stressed.Fertility requirements differ with each grass. Consult your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent or visit www.GeorgiaTurf.com for fertility recommendations.No matter what the species, though, fertilizing too early in the season, before soils are warm enough to support continual growth, can accelerate green-up but cause detrimental long-term effects.Fertilizing these grasses in late-winter or early spring can cause them to break dormancy. Then when the inevitable late-season cold snap hits, they’ve used their stored food reserves. They have no energy to withstand environmental extremes. To avoid this, don’t fertilize until the soil reaches 65 degrees.Thatch, as lawns get older, becomes more problematic, particularly if the turf has been mowed above its recommended height ranges. Increased thatch slows down the turf’s spring transition. It makes it more susceptible to disease, too.Water – either too much or too little or even a combination of the two – can cause problems for grasses, especially zoysia.Diseases can strike during spring green-up. The most common is Rhizoctonia large patch, which appears as large areas of blighted grass.This disease is most active when night temperatures are between 50 and 60 degrees. When conditions are right, it’s common for the disease to become active first in the fall and then again in the spring.You can see its typical “halo” when the disease is active. Fall and spring fungicide applications can control it. Consult your local UGA Extension agent for proper fungicides and rates.last_img read more

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Perú and U.S. Hold Second Meeting on Cyberdefense and Cybersecurity

first_imgThe Joint Staff reported that its challenge is to create doctrine and to standardize strategies and methodologies for cyberdefense and cyberstrategy. Likewise, Peru’s military wants to implement a Cyberspace Operational Command (CODEC) and a Computer Incident Response Center at the country’s Joint Chiefs of Staff and military institutions. In addition to the above-mentioned topics, the three days of meetings allowed the participants to share information on best practices in cyberdefense. “I would say that cyberwar is the new threat for our century. A cybercommand is the most logical step for the Armed Forces in the future, and something positive that is being implemented by Perú,” Donahue stated. The conference offered a space for each participating country to learn how the other responded to and dealt with common threats concerning cyberdefense and cybersecurity, in addition to debates about doctrine, organization, experiences, and lessons learned. “A command like CODEC would be able to conduct military operations at a strategic, operational, and also information technology level. Other countries like Brazil and Colombia already have this ability, and I think that the time has come for Perú to join this select group,” concluded Col. Taipe. “These meetings provide to us the best and latest information on new threats and global risks that have arisen over the last few years as quickly as we have made advancements in technology and cybernetics. The Armed Forces are not exempt from vulnerability and attacks if we do not take the necessary precautions,” said Peruvian Air Force Colonel Daniel Taipe Domínguez during his presentation. In addition to the above-mentioned topics, the three days of meetings allowed the participants to share information on best practices in cyberdefense. “I would say that cyberwar is the new threat for our century. A cybercommand is the most logical step for the Armed Forces in the future, and something positive that is being implemented by Perú,” Donahue stated. According to retired U.S. Air Force Major and SOUTHCOM representative Michael Donahue, “SOUTHCOM regularly sponsors meetings such as this one, called Subject Matter Expert Exchanges (SMEE), which allow each country the opportunity to learn from the other and share their best practices for work in specific areas.” According to retired U.S. Air Force Major and SOUTHCOM representative Michael Donahue, “SOUTHCOM regularly sponsors meetings such as this one, called Subject Matter Expert Exchanges (SMEE), which allow each country the opportunity to learn from the other and share their best practices for work in specific areas.” By Dialogo February 03, 2015 With the goal of exchanging knowledge, representatives of the Joint Staff of the Peruvian Armed Forces, the Peruvian Secretariat of Security and National Defense, along with the Peruvian Armed Forces Telematics and Intelligence bureaus, met with authorities from the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) for the II Discussion Meeting on Cyberdefense and Cybersecurity from January 20-22 at the headquarters of the Joint Staff of the Armed Forces in Lima. The conference offered a space for each participating country to learn how the other responded to and dealt with common threats concerning cyberdefense and cybersecurity, in addition to debates about doctrine, organization, experiences, and lessons learned. “These meetings provide to us the best and latest information on new threats and global risks that have arisen over the last few years as quickly as we have made advancements in technology and cybernetics. The Armed Forces are not exempt from vulnerability and attacks if we do not take the necessary precautions,” said Peruvian Air Force Colonel Daniel Taipe Domínguez during his presentation. With the goal of exchanging knowledge, representatives of the Joint Staff of the Peruvian Armed Forces, the Peruvian Secretariat of Security and National Defense, along with the Peruvian Armed Forces Telematics and Intelligence bureaus, met with authorities from the United States Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) for the II Discussion Meeting on Cyberdefense and Cybersecurity from January 20-22 at the headquarters of the Joint Staff of the Armed Forces in Lima. The Joint Staff reported that its challenge is to create doctrine and to standardize strategies and methodologies for cyberdefense and cyberstrategy. Likewise, Peru’s military wants to implement a Cyberspace Operational Command (CODEC) and a Computer Incident Response Center at the country’s Joint Chiefs of Staff and military institutions. “A command like CODEC would be able to conduct military operations at a strategic, operational, and also information technology level. Other countries like Brazil and Colombia already have this ability, and I think that the time has come for Perú to join this select group,” concluded Col. Taipe. The affinity and understanding of what is good for the country held by the Armed Forces, the Police and the Courts contribute to making successes happen and also the good salaries the Armed Forces, Police and Courts enjoy contribute to raising the morale of their active and retired members. How awfullast_img read more

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Babylon Man Charged With Murdering Mom, Stabbing Sister

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 33-year-old man was arrested for stabbing his elderly mother to death and seriously injured his older sister during a fight at their Babylon home on Friday morning, Suffolk County police said.Kathleen Kearns, 59, called 911 to report that she and her mother, Mina, had been stabbed at the house they shared on Livingston Avenue at 7:20 a.m., police said.Both victims were taken to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip, where Mina was pronounced dead and Kathleen was treated for serious injuries.Officers apprehended Joseph Kearns shortly later. Homicide Squad detectives charged him with second-degree murder and attempted murder.He will be arraigned Saturday at First District Court in Central Islip.last_img read more

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HUT: The satellite balance confirmed the great importance of tourism for the domestic economy

first_imgRELATED NEWS: The satellite balance prepared for 2016 once again confirmed the extremely high importance of tourism for the overall national economy, regardless of whether it is a direct or indirect effect, the HUT points out, adding that the fact that Croatian tourism generates a total of 317.000 jobs, from of which 108.000 directly in the sector, and the remaining 209.000 in tourism-related and related activities, which represents 20% of all jobs in Croatia, is just one of the indicators of the importance of the sector. HUT believes that the preparation of the next Satellite Balance will additionally find a way to measure the effects of tourists in areas that are not measured this time, such as tolls, rent-a-car, passenger transport in the destination, health services and parking. This consumption will further increase the effects of tourism. Data that objectively show the overall effects of tourism on the national economy give us the right to expect that tourism will become the focus of strategic thinking on the development of the Republic of Croatia, the HUT concludes. In 2016, tourism with its overall effects contributed to the total gross domestic product of Croatia with almost 17 percent, and the share of gross value added of tourism and related activities in the total gross value added of the national economy is a high 24 percent. The Croatian Tourism Association (HUT), the umbrella association for the tourism sector, welcomes the drafting Satellite balances of Croatian tourism which measures the overall effects of tourism according to internationally recognized standards. VELJKO OSTOJIĆ, HUT: YEARS OF FIGHT FOR EVERY GUEST FOLLOW USlast_img read more

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Chelsfield eyes White City summer search

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ABP and defence unions in court over ‘complicated’ final salary plan

first_imgRené Maatman, the scheme’s lawyer, argued that the mounting problems were about to cause a “short-circuit within ABP’s administration machine”.The MoD’s final salary plan is one of the last remaining in the Netherlands, and is complicated in part as a result of new legislation based on average salary arrangements.The FD said ABP’s efforts to calculate the pensions of military staff – who account for 5% of ABP’s total membership – “have become unbalanced at the expense of all other participants”.Last year, the MoD and the unions seemed to have reached an agreement about abolishing the final salary plan next year, but the negotiations between the two players stalled last autumn.However, ABP said that it had no other option than to start implementing average salary arrangements as of 1 January, as it no longer wanted to improvise carrying out the final salary plan.On Monday, Mark Heemskerk, the unions’ lawyer, argued that ABP could not unilaterally change the pension arrangements “just because they were complicated and it didn’t have its administration in order”.Heemskerk said only the social partners could change the pension plan, according to the FD.ABP, for its turn, contended that the pension fund had the duty to assess whether the agreements were feasible, and had to decline if this wasn’t possible. “This point has been reached,” it said.Both parties also quoted IT experts arguing in favour of their respective cases. The €418bn Dutch civil service scheme ABP and the defence trade unions are at loggerheads, as the pension scheme no longer wants to implement “very complicated” final salary arrangements for military personnel.According to daily newspaper FD, the unions brought summary proceedings against the pension fund on Monday, demanding that it continue to provide a final salary plan as long negotiations about new average salary arrangements were incomplete.Last week, the unions summoned the Dutch Ministry of Defence (MoD) to court. The employer wanted to get rid of the expensive final salary plan, insisting that a previous agreement with the unions about changing the scheme was valid.The FD quoted ABP as saying that it needed to manually calculate part of the military staff’s pension, but so many mistakes were made that regulator De Nederlandsche Bank had threatened to impose sanctions on the pension fund.last_img read more

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Utah to Batesville: Following a map and a dream

first_img“I just want to encourage the kids to have courage to confront their own fears,” Nobbe said.BATESVILLE, Ind. – Travel for millions of Americans is part of the Thanksgiving tradition.For Justine Nobbe, travel is the fun and untraditional part.The 26-year-old departed October 7 on a bicycling adventure from Salt Lake City, Utah to her hometown of Batesville.Nobbe, a self-described outdoor enthusiast, attributes the inspiration to first learning about the cross-country biking experience from a client when she was a personal trainer.The 2006 Batesville High School graduate also participated in a 2009 California coast bicycle tour with then-boyfriend-now-husband Michael Nobbe, 26, of Batesville.“I just went on adventure and adventure, and not just cycling but backpacking, rock climbing, and mountaineering,” Justine divulged. “Over the past year, it was like, ‘Ok I want to do another tour, and I want to do it for me, and something that means a lot to me,’ so I decided I was going to cycle home!”“There were many different experiences that led to it, but I am surrounded by so many crazy adventurous people.”Dubbed the “home tour,” Nobbe endured single-digit temperatures, bicycle breakdowns and foot problems while voyaging through Utah, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois and Indiana.“I think between Salt Lake City and back up through Colorado, just through those two states alone, I climbed over 35,000 feet or something like that,” Nobbe recalled.At one point, she biked 125 miles in three days gaining 9,000 feet of elevation.To put this in perspective, Mt. Everest, the tallest mountain in the world, is documented at 29,029 feet.At one point, she biked 125 miles in three days gaining 9,000 feet of elevation with mostly no cell phone reception.“I’ll cycle up mountains all day, I can deal with it being zero degrees outside, and I can deal with being hungry and thirsty,” Nobbe said.“The hardest part for me was toward the end of my trip.”That’s when Mother Nature stepped in with an unseasonal accumulating November snow in the Midwest. It put the brakes on the bicycle tour as Nobbe had to make it back in time for a friend’s wedding this past weekend.“We weren’t able to finish the last leg of our cycling and that was devastating to me, literally heart wrenching, tear-jerking devastating.”When Justine arrived in Batesville on November 19, she had traveled 1,300 miles by bicycle and 500 miles by car or train.“I tend to want to control everything and as soon as the unexpected sets in, I struggle with that,” Nobbe admitted. “So, it’s been a good learning lesson because, that’s life. It’s been an adventure even when I wasn’t cycling.”This story isn’t about the number of pedal strokes, miles or states. It’s about an adventure. It’s about somebody reaching for something more.“It was a dream I had and it is fulfilling! I don’t think everyone should go and cycle across the country; it’s about finding a way to live a life fulfilled,” Nobbe proclaimed.On Tuesday, Justine spoke about her cross-county trek to seventh and eighth graders at St. Nicholas School in Sunman.Her message was simple: Don’t be afraid to dream.Justine and Michael dated while at Batesville High School and married in 2010.“For kids that age, I challenge them to even acknowledge their dreams and that’s the first thing I asked the kids to do,” Nobbe professed. “I don’t care how silly it is, and I don’t care if it is something that seems impossible or unrealistic, just say it, just say that dream out loud and acknowledge it.”“We often live our lives in fear, like I am not going to do something because I am so afraid of failure, the people, and scared I can’t do it,” said Nobbe.“I just want to encourage the kids to have courage to confront their own fears.”Justine is the daughter of Mike and Julie Tekulve, of Oldenburg, and the late Bruce Allen.The 2006 Batesville graduate married her high school sweetheart, Michael, in 2010. Michael is the son of Matt and Marla Nobbe, of Oldenburg.last_img read more

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