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USA: Maritime International to Move Overseas Production to Louisiana

first_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: International View post tag: Louisiana View post tag: to View post tag: usa Maritime International, which makes mooring systems and protective fenders for international harbors and the U.S Navy, is expanding … USA: Maritime International to Move Overseas Production to Louisiana (boston)[mappress]Source: boston, November 24, 2011; Image: maritimeinternational View post tag: Maritime View post tag: Navycenter_img View post tag: Move Share this article View post tag: Naval View post tag: overseas View post tag: production Industry news Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Maritime International to Move Overseas Production to Louisiana November 24, 2011last_img read more

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Kingsmill sees upturn

first_imgAllied Bakeries’ £14 million Kingsmill relaunch in February has led to “significant” growth in market share, it said this week.Marketing director Jon Wilson told British Baker that increases in distribution, promotional activity and heavyweight advertising had boosted sales. Consumer feedback on the new recipes had been very positive. He said: “We have seen a significant increase in Kingsmill’s market share following the relaunch. This has provided us with a strong platform to launch the next phases of our plans.”Sainsbury’s bought-in bread and rolls buyer Ian Cambridge told British Baker that the “massive relaunch” had been implemented well in Sainsbury’s. He commented: “The data I have seen from Allied points to improvement in market share and a clear steal away from Hovis. My gut feeling is that Allied is doing the right thing for the brand. Time will tell.”Allied gave the update after ABF said this week that performance at its UK bakeries in the run-up to the relaunch, rising energy costs and currency lag, led to a £20m drop in operating profit in its grocery division in the 24 weeks to 3 March.Analyst Richard Workman of Oriel Securities said: “Allied Bakeries’ substantial losses are not insignificant, even in the context of a big group like ABF. The jury is still out on whether Kingsmill can re-establish itself.”Graham Jones of Panmure said: “ABF’s bakeries’ high wheat costs were only recovered with a retail price rise at the end of the half. This was accompanied by disappointing Kingsmill volumes. The relaunch of Kingsmill looks to have gone well in its first month or so. It is still too early to call.”ABF also owns companies Cereform, British Sugar and clothing chain Primark. Operating profit for its grocery portfolio fell from £84 million to £64m, while sales fell from £1.26bn to £1.23bn. Half-year group pre-tax profit rose 5% to £268m on group revenue up 12% at £3.22bn.last_img read more

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Former Premier bosses in £1.4m pay-off

first_imgThree former bosses of embattled Premier Foods, the company behind the Hovis and Mr Kipling brands, received pay-offs of more than £1.4m, it was revealed yesterday.Former chief executive Robert Schofield was paid nearly £420,000 on top of his £467,000 salary, while chief operating officer Tim Kelly and finance director Jim Smart received payments worth about £1m in total. And, new chief executive Michael Clarke received a £1.94m “golden hello” to compensate him for lost bonuses from his previous job with Kraft.The news of the pay-out was revealed in the company’s annual report and also follows the downgrading of its bread division by £282m after a whopping 90.4% slump in profits.last_img read more

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Medical School gets accreditation on continuing education for nurses

first_img Read Full Story In a move to offer broader interprofessional training, Harvard Medical School has received an accreditation term from the American Nurses Credentialing Center, making the School an accredited provider of continuing education units (CEU) for nurses.“A large number of the learners who attend our continuing medical education courses are nurses,” said David Roberts, dean for external education at HMS.“The ability to offer these credits shows our commitment to promoting interprofessional continuing education, which is associated with improved health care delivery and better patient outcomes,” Roberts said.The World Health Organization and its partners identify interprofessional collaboration in education and practice as a strategy to mitigate the global health workforce crisis and recent studies have demonstrated the positive impact of this strategy on clinician wellness and patient care.In addition, a study published in the Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice noted, among other benefits, “[B]y understanding where one profession’s skill set ends and another’s begins, participants were able to provide more immediate and continuous care for their patients.”“As an evidence base continues to be established related to the impact of interprofessional education on practice and health outcomes, an opportunity exists for us to contribute to this body of research by tracking our work to build interprofessional education,” said Ellen Long-Middleton, the lead nurse planner accountable for the overall functioning of the accredited provider unit.“Nurses are a vital part of the health care delivery team, and we are committed to their professional development,” said Ajay Singh, senior associate dean for postgraduate medical education at HMS. “Achievement of this accreditation is the culmination of a multi-year process starting with conversations at the leadership level.”last_img read more

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More Than 120 Countries Will Analyze Multinational Anti-Drug Operations in Mexico

first_imgBy Dialogo March 31, 2011 More than 120 countries on five continents will study the creation of a common front against drug trafficking during an international conference in the Mexican beach resort of Cancún (in eastern Mexico) at the beginning of April, Mexican authorities announced on 29 March. The shared project calls for the implementation of “multinational operations against specific objectives, on the basis of the exchange of intelligence and the coordination of efforts,” the Secretariat of Public Safety explained in a statement. With the formation of this “common front,” governments will also exchange “information related to irregular movements of money and the diversion of chemical products,” the agency added. The twenty-eighth edition of the International Drug Enforcement Conference, first held in 1983 in Panama, is expected to meet from 5 to 7 April in Cancún (on the Caribbean). The previous meeting was in 2010 in Rio. The government of Mexico, which for more than three years has been experiencing a wave of violence attributed to drug cartels in part of its territory, will be represented by Secretary of Public Safety Genaro García Luna and Attorney-General Arturo Chávez. In one of the few conference events about which advance information has been released, García Luna will give a presentation on 6 April about the ties between Mexican and Colombian cartels, together with Colombian Defense Minister Rodrigo Rivera and the police director of that South American country, Óscar Naranjo.last_img read more

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10 WTF Things About Long Island

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Beyond the obvious issues that everyone complains about–taxes, traffic, cost of living, the way we tawk–there are some seriously twisted things about this place we call home. Here are a few we take for granted that boggle the minds of interlopers who happen upon our fair Island. 1. Robert Moses was a racist. If you’re from Long Island you’re familiar with this little nugget of history. When the parkways were designed on Long Island, the underpasses were constructed with low clearances so buses couldn’t pass under them. In the master planner’s mind, buses were for minorities. In the minds of the people who approved these plans, minorities = Democrats. And the rest is history. So while we still have the Long Island Expressway (gasp!) the parkways have ingloriously preserved this piece of our racist history. But here’s the deal: If you’re from Long Island and don’t know this already and insist on driving a too-big-for-the-bridges truck on the parkways, you might be better off moving to New Jersey and attempting to navigate the insane jug-handle exits they built to confuse everyone else on the planet not from the Garden State. Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Imagescenter_img 2. All Things Lohan. Most celebrities, and hopefully their families, hit the Big Apple or Hollywood and gradually lose their Long Island identity. A few hang around, like Billy Joel, Alan Alda and Nelson DeMille. And we’re cool with that. Others like Billy Crystal, Howard Stern, Jerry Seinfeld and Jim Brown moved on. They don’t deny their Long Island roots; they just got on with their lives and moved to places celebrities move, wherever that is. Not the Lohan family. They’re hanging around doing their level best to constantly remind people that they’re Long Islanders. The one who’s actually famous doesn’t live here, but the ones that want to be famous do. And, honestly, it’s kind of a nightmare. Our sincere apologies.3. Montauk Highway in July. Who’s up for a road trip? There’s nothing quite like a scenic drive down Long Island’s historic thoroughfare, meandering through quaint South Fork villages on your way to the iconic Montauk Lighthouse. Such a journey is best made any time of the year that’s not summer. Try doing this between June and September and you’ll have to set aside a solid four hours in bumper-to-bumper traffic. (Here we go again complaining about traffic.)4. Strip Malls. What’s with our beautiful Island and strip malls, anyway? Seriously, we’re dying to know. These ubiquitous shopping centers are usually replete with a nail salon, deli, a store where everything is a dollar, cell phone shop, pizza parlor, a tailor and (if we’re lucky) an OTB! Yes! Since us web-savvy Long Islanders learned to master the art of online shopping, stretches of Sunrise Highway now look like a post-apocalyptic scene from a sci-fi movie. And yet, the only thing Long Island seems to build (i.e. the only thing zoning boards are capable of approving) are strip malls. 5. Segregation. Long Islanders know the folklore well. Brothers William and Alfred Levitt established a planned community called Levittown, which is widely acknowledged as the birthplace of modern suburbia. Affordable loans with no down payment were offered to applicants, in particular G.I.s returning from World War II, and the community was an instant success. But there was a catch: Only Caucasian families were allowed to apply. Though this exclusion was rarely so public as this, most Long Island communities developed organically in a similar fashion. The result is the most diversely populated, segregated community in America. Fancy that. It’s a sad legacy that persists today. No wonder the KKK has been on a recruitment drive here. Come to think of it, maybe President Trump will name Long Island America’s new capital. He’d fit right in. But we’d definitely high tail it out of here. We hear Canada is nice.6. Cheese Fries at 2 a.m. It’s a rite of passage. We love diners more than special agent Dale Cooper from Twin Peaks. Any establishment that moves effortlessly from chocolate chip pancakes to prime rib no matter the time of day is worthy of a Michelin Star in our books. But you haven’t lived until you’ve gorged on the Long Island delicacy that is cheese fries—with gravy!—at 2 a.m. The scene is as gory as the dish. Five or six grown adults stuffed into a four-person booth ordering two, no three, plates of cheese fries. Surely, it’s the cure to the common hangover. It must be! “This is a good idea,” you’ll say to one another as the waiter clears a path on the crowded table and slides three orders of coronary sludgery toward the napkin dispenser. You won’t be needing those napkins, anyway. That’s what sleeves are for.LIPA crews working to restore power after Superstorm Sandy. (Rashed Mian/Long Island Press)7. Above-Ground Power Lines. Many Long Islanders came in close contact with out-of-state power crews in the days following Hurricane Sandy. We invited them into our candlelit homes, offered them stovetop-warmed coffee and listened as they spun yarns of restoring power throughout the nation. We listened in horror and amazement as they marveled over our antiquated above-ground utility wires fastened to poles that haven’t been used in industrialized nations for decades. “It’s not like this in other places?” we wondered aloud to these fearless power generators. “No, ma’am. We’ve only ever heard of grids like this. It’s like traveling back in time. But we’re much obliged for your hospitality.” And like that, they were gone. Yet, the delicate power lines persist, forcing us to huddle in prayer before every storm, pleading with our almighty savior that those precarious wooden poles dotting our neighborhoods withstand Mother Nature’s wrath one more time.Photo credit: Village of Great Neck Plaza8. The land of a million municipalities. Great Neck. Great Neck Estates. Great Neck Plaza. Great Neck Gardens. Great Neck Manor. Kings Point Police Department. Kensington Police Department. Great Neck Estates Police Department. Great Neck North Schools. Great Neck South Schools. Seven zip codes. Three fire departments. Hamlets, villages, police departments. Whew! This is just one peninsula on Long Island we’re talking about. We have about 40,000 more municipal and educational entities and districts to cover, but that’s for another listicle—or perhaps a months-long investigation that will shock you to the core! Apparently we won’t be satisfied until we have one mayor, police officer, councilperson, teacher and firefighter per person. Cronyism? Not here. Noooo way.Artists rendering of the Tritec Redevelopment in Patchogue.9. No Vacancy, Because No Rentals. In spite of some of the crazy things you’ve just read about our rather ridiculous Island, people really do want to live here. High employment, great schools, incredible beaches… We’ve got some pretty enviable stuff. One thing we don’t have, however, is enough rental housing. There are a couple of reasons for this, but the biggest one happens to be political. When Long Island was formed into the cozy, tax-gouging land of opportunity it is today, the planners had a similar vision. (See No. 1, 5 and 8 above.) The political architects of our suburban paradise were mostly Republicans who believed in a very simple equation: Apartments = Colored People = Democrats. So when you add it all up—low bridges to prevent mass transit, housing specifically designed for white people, and hundreds of municipalities that control local zoning laws—the result is 3 million people living mostly in single-family houses.New York Islanders John Tavares shoots against the Pittsburgh Penguins on Saturday, May 11, 2013. (Photo by Joe Nuzzo)10. Our Sports Teams can’t wait to get the f— out of here. The Nets were on Long Island, briefly. If we can claim Queens for the purpose of this argument, then we had possession of the New York Jets as well for a bit. Even if the Queens connection is too much of a stretch, at least the Jets practiced at Hofstra University until recently. The Islanders, well, we all know what happened there. The bottom line is that our football teams play in New Jersey, our baseball, basketball, and now our hockey teams all belong to the boroughs. It’s given us quite the complex, actually. If the Long Island Ducks ever leave, we’ll all need therapy.last_img read more

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The door’s open

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Hong Kong leader hails ‘return to peace’, anniversary protests banned

first_imgTopics : Hong Kong’s leader Thursday hailed her city’s “return to peace” after China imposed a security law that helped suppress a pro-democracy movement, as just a handful of people defied a heavy police presence and protested during National Day celebrations.The People’s Republic of China celebrates its founding on October 1 with a holiday and carefully choreographed festivities.But in Hong Kong, it has become a day of grievance for those worried about authoritarian Beijing’s intensifying crackdown against its opponents. Protest has been effectively outlawed for most of this year and Beijing also imposed a strict national security law on the semi-autonomous business hub in June.Helicopters flying the Chinese and Hong Kong flags buzzed over the harbor on Thursday morning as Chief Executive Carrie Lam and senior mainland officials attended a ceremony ringed by police and security barriers.”Over the past few months, an indisputable fact in front of everyone is that our society has returned to peace,” Lam said in her speech.”Our country’s national security has been protected in Hong Kong and our citizens can again exercise their rights and liberties in accordance with laws.” Last year, the 70th anniversary brought fierce clashes between protesters and police during seven months of democracy demonstrations that upended Hong Kong.Authorities denied permission for a protest march this year, citing security concerns and an anti-coronavirus ban on more than four people gathering in public.Lam’s administration also suspended September local elections for a year — one of the few occasions when Hong Kongers get to cast a vote — citing the risk posed by the pandemic.A police source told AFP that 6,000 police officers had been drafted in to stop any protests — double the contingency usually placed on reserve.center_img New security law The crackdown has been aided by the national security law that China imposed on the city in June. The broadly worded legislation criminalized expressing certain opinions, deepened the political chill in the city and allowed mainland China’s security apparatus to operate openly in Hong Kong for the first time.The security law has led to sanctions by the United States and condemnation by many other Western nations.But Beijing and Hong Kong authorities say it is needed to restore stability. “The national security law will absolutely stop rabble-rousers in Hong Kong from having their capricious way,” China’s Liaison Office said this week. ‘End one-party rule’ Throughout the day, groups of prominent democracy activists held small protests — deliberately keeping to no more than four people.”In today’s China, those who pursue freedom are suppressed while those doing the suppressing are in power,” activist Lee Cheuk-yan told reporters.One group, surrounded by some 40 police officers, chanted “End one-party rule” and burned a protest petition. Others gathered outside the heavily guarded Liaison Office that represents Beijing’s government in the city. A day earlier, office director Luo Huining gave a speech calling for more patriotism to be instilled in Hong Kong, saying pride in the motherland was a duty, not a choice. Police maintained a high presence throughout the city on Thursday, conducting multiple stop and searches.In the busy shopping hub of Causeway Bay — which saw many clashes last year — riot police hoisted banners telling crowds to disperse after they received heckles. “Today is not a day of celebration…  it is time for the world to be aware of how the Communist Party silences the voice of Hong Kong,” prominent activist Joshua Wong told reporters shortly before being moved on by officers.Five people were arrested earlier in the week on suspicion of inciting others to protest and commit violent acts. For most of this year, protest has been all but impossible in Hong Kong.On the rare occasions when demonstrations do bubble up, riot police and plain-clothes officers move quickly — on one day last month nearly 300 people were arrested.Over the last 16 months, more than 10,000 have been detained during protests with courts facing a backlog of trials, including of many prominent protest leaders.last_img read more

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IPE Views: Europe expands!

first_imgInvesting in European equities is much more complex than it may appear at first glance, warns Joseph MariathasanWhen my children were in nursery school, they always used to get confused between Austria and Australia. I had to explain that one was a small country in Europe with lots of mountains and the other a large country on the other side of the world with no mountains. Luckily, they have grown up a bit since then, as I would have a hard time explaining to them why Australia is now an entrant in the Eurovision Song Contest this year (yes, it’s true), hosted, appropriately enough, in Vienna in May. Perhaps Melbourne may have been an alternative option given Australia’s participation, particularly since it is reputed to be the second-largest Greek city after Athens. And if Greece’s largest export continues to be its young people, it may end being the largest!Investors face the same issue – what exactly does Europe mean? Investing in European equities may seem a straightforward decision, but deciding what constitutes Europe, unlike the US, is not so clear. Football association UEFA includes Kazakhstan, whilst Israel has won the Eurovision Song contest three times and hosted it twice. Neither country, however, would usually be seen as part of a European equity mandate.The euro-zone may be a clearly defined concept, but it would exclude major investment destinations such as the UK and Switzerland, which would be an odd choice, particularly for non-European investors. But even euro-denominated investors would then face the issue of how best to incorporate exposures to countries with major stock markets such as the UK, Switzerland and Sweden.   What such examples indicate is that making arbitrary groupings of countries based on geographical proximity alone inevitably leads to debate as to what is appropriate. Does it matter? For active mandates with managers that are producing focused portfolios, probably not. But for investors seeking to gain a broad exposure to European equities, deciding what that could mean does have implications on where their exposures will lie.Whilst much of the variation in economic exposures within any European stock market can be accounted for by stock-specific factors, some can also be attributed to the legacy of history. The UK and the Netherlands, for example, have many international companies built up from the days of their colonial empires that spanned the globe with a high exposure to emerging markets. This has produced some interesting comparisons between British and Dutch companies and their US direct competitors. The US companies have not had to compete overseas quite as much as the Europeans, as they have had a very large domestic market of their own and never had the contacts and distribution network overseas the Europeans gained through their empires. Unilever grew under the Dutch empire, and managers tell me Procter & Gamble could not compete as well as Unilever in Indonesia, for example.It is not just the UK and Dutch stock markets that have benefited from the days of empire. Austria has a high exposure to countries in Eastern Europe, many of which it had historical ties with from the days of the Austro-Hungarian empire, whilst parts of Southern and Eastern Europe have long-standing religious and cultural ties with Greece dating back to the Byzantine empire. In contrast, Portugal, despite its imperial history, has the highest domestic exposure of any country in Europe, and Spain again has not been able to emulate the UK and the Netherlands in terms of incubating global companies during its colonial past.Less surprising are the smaller countries such as Switzerland, Finland, Ireland and Sweden, which have some very large international companies domiciled in their jurisdictions, but whose local markets provide an insignificant share of their revenues. Schindler Group in Switzerland and Kone in Finland are two of the four companies dominating global sales in elevators. Needless to say, the home market was not what they built their businesses on.Investing in European equities is a much more complex idea than it may appear at first glance. Individual countries are too small to be considered as separate investment destinations except by domestic institutions that still cling onto an unjustified home bias. But what constitutes a natural collection of countries to define an investment strategy is not straightforward in a region whose political boundaries have been rearranged countless times and whose companies often reflect empires that once spanned the globe. The only thing everyone can agree on, apart from perhaps some of the residents of Melbourne, is that Australia is not part of Europe!Joseph Mariathasan is contributing editor at IPElast_img read more

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​Swedish government urges ‘ambitious’ sustainability agenda

first_imgHe also offered the country’s continued growth – despite legislating for the highest carbon price worldwide – as a way to “debunk the unfortunate misunderstanding” of a conflict between sustainability and profit.He argued that Sweden was moving in the right direction, but that “much more” needed to be done.“We, at the moment, are looking at the legislation that is governing the pension funds in Sweden – both looking at how they are structured, but also looking at the sustainability agenda and trying to raise the bar and making a more ambitious agenda for sustainably when it comes to pension fund investments.”Bolund, who was named deputy finance minister in 2014, repeatedly praised the work done by his country’s AP funds in measuring their carbon footprint, but also highlighted that the Norwegian Government Pension Fund Global had gone further after being instructed to divest its holdings in coal.“So, we see this as a process going on in many countries and in many pension funds around the world, and I think we have the opportunity to be a big part of that and also lead the way for others,” he said.AP4 has previously led efforts to lower its carbon emissions by working with Amundi on a low-carbon equity index, with the endeavor supported by Fonds de Réserve pour les Retraites. Sweden’s government is looking to raise the bar of sustainable investment among pension funds, according to its deputy finance minister, who insisted there was no conflict between profit and sustainability.Per Bolund, a member of Sweden’s Green Party and minister for financial markets, said the Swedish government would be examining how matters of sustainability could be better integrated into pension fund decision-making.Speaking at the RI Europe conference in London, the MP urged investors to leave behind the perceived conflict between sustainability and profit.“We have to see that we are in a new world where, actually, sustainability and profits are combinable – and also, if you don’t take sustainability into [consideration] when you do the investment decision, you will lose out on profits in the future.”last_img read more

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