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Group debates alcohol issues

first_imgStudent Senate debated improvements to alcohol education and made further changes to the process for undergraduate elections Wednesday. Senators reported feedback from their dorms about the way program such as “College HAS Issues” and Peers Inspiring Listening, Learning and Responsible Socializing (PILLARS) educate students about drinking. Student body vice president Andrew Bell said student government would like to improve alcohol education. “We bring these issues up because we now have a Campus Life Council (CLC) task force that is addressing the culture of drinking on campus, and we thought a good place to start would be alcohol education,” Bell said. “We are looking at an overview of the way students learn about drinking.” Some senators said students in their dorms felt overwhelmed by the amount of alcohol education at the beginning of their freshman year but did not see much education after first week of school. Siegfried senator Kevin McDermott said freshmen found the “College HAS Issues” seminar to be repetitive. Senators also suggested ways to expand alcohol education. Carroll Hall senator John Sanders said more education on Indiana State laws would be especially relevant to students at Notre Dame. Cavanaugh senator Tegan Chapman said her dorm asked about the signs of alcohol poisoning, and Farley senator Leslie Tatlow was concerned about medical amnesty. “A lot of the girls in my dorm wanted to know what to do if a friend is sick [after drinking] but you are worried about getting in trouble,” Tatlow said. Chief of staff Nick Ruof said a formal medical amnesty policy was not put into place last year after student government discussed the issue with the administration. “What we came to realize is that in a ResLife meeting [the administration] takes into consideration the entire situation,” Ruof said. “You should be worried about your friends’ health over getting in trouble.” Student government will continue to look at alcohol education and try to improve, Bell said. The Student Senate also passed a resolution to change several clauses in the constitution on undergraduate elections. Oversight chair Paige Becker and Judicial Council president Marcelo Perez presented the changes to the senators. The Senate passed a resolution earlier this month to create an Executive Committee to deal with allegations made against candidates for election. One of the most significant changes to the constitution related to campaigning on election day. Previously, the Judicial Council could sanction a candidate if a supporter posted the voting link in a Facebook status on the day of an election, Becker said. Now, the link will only be accessible through an e-mail to students. “One of the positive things we felt about this change was that the link to the voting website only goes out to the student body through an e-mail from Judicial Council,” Becker said. “Candidates are not allowed to provide this link to anyone else.” Changes were also made to reformat and clarify parts of the constitution. The resolution passed with 25 votes in favor.last_img read more

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Rivers receives Award of Appreciation

first_imgAssistant Director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies Holly Rivers received the 11th College of Arts and Letters’ Award of Appreciation from Dean John T. McGreevy on Sept. 10.Rivers received the award for her 12 years of work at the Kellogg Institute, where she has primarily served as an advisor to undergraduates applying to the Institute’s student programs. McGreevy read a laudatory recommendation letter from a faculty member at the award ceremony, according to a Kellogg Institute press release.“Holly is the life force of an astonishing array of undergraduate programming at the Kellogg Institute,” McGreevy read. “She works endlessly to innovate new and better programs for undergraduates.”McGreevy’s predecessor as dean, Mark Roche, created the College of Arts and Letters Award of Appreciation 14 years ago. McGreevy said the award is typically given to someone who assists in the mission of the College of Arts and Letters.McGreevy cited Rivers’s efforts as being crucial to helping students in the College of Arts and Letters obtain opportunities through the Kellogg Institute.“[Rivers] has helped assist students with opportunities in undergraduate research going towards a senior thesis, study abroad and sometimes even language learning,” McGreevy said.“It is much more likely than it was a generation ago that students will travel or work outside of the United States,” McGreevy said. “And we are trying to prepare them for that environment.”Rivers cited the recent deluge of congratulations from her fellow faculty as being one of the best parts about receiving the award.“It definitely made my summer one of the nicest I’ve had working here,” Rivers said about winning the award.In addition to Rivers’s advising work, she also travels every summer to many of the different locations in which the Kellogg Institute has programs.“Initially, nearly all of the students in the International Studies program were in the College of Arts and Letters. Over time, the Institute has been receiving students from other colleges,” Rivers said.Rivers also noted how the majority of students in the Institute’s programs are political science majors, but recently students studying through the Institute have had varying majors, such as business and pre-professional.Rivers said becoming involved in the Kellogg Institute’s programs is a great advantage to Notre Dame students entering the job market.“Many people are graduating with a degree. Students going through the Kellogg Institute show that they take the initiative,” Rivers said. “They show that they are flexible by learning languages and immersing themselves within a new culture.”Tags: Award of Appreciation, College of Arts & Letters, Holly Rivers, John McGreevy, Kellogg Institutelast_img read more

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Lecture explores media, Black Power movement

first_imgDr. Jane Rhodes, Dean for the Study of Race and Ethnicity and Professor and Chair of American Studies at Macalester College, gave a lecture titled “Black Women, Black Power and the Media’s Glare” in Hesburgh Center Auditorium on Thursday evening.Dr. Rhodes, who specializes in the study of race, gender and mass media, said black power is influenced by and demonstrated through photographs and images, which change the way we understand the black body.Rosie Biehl | The Observer “There is a meaning in representation, and they shape what we remember,” Rhodes said. “[A famous photo of Stokley Carmichael] to me is a classic representation of media flare. … He has become increasingly radicalized … to stress black power.”Rhondes also said the black press is often very different from mainstream press.Black women were often pictured as “helpmates to male authority” and “associated with tragedy,” Rhodes said. For these images, Rhodes said she blames the photographers who took them.“The profound aesthetic transformation of black women’s hair also becomes political statement,” Rhodes said. “To have short natural hair, to use black women as models, and to promote black beauty, is a political notion.”She then talked about “core figures” of black women: Angela Davis, Kathleen Cleaver, Elaine Brown, Assata Shakur, Michelle Obama and Nicki Minaj.“When I did a search on New York Times, I found about 1600 articles about Angela Davis,” Rhodes said. “There are some key things to know about Angela Davis. She was a communist. She was connected to [the Black Panther Party] for a short period. She moved to UCLA and was hired as a philosophy professor.”In 1970, she was accused in a murder case, but was acquitted by all-white jury, Rhodes said.“We love the sensationalism of the story,” Rhodes said. “As someone who is from a middle class family … and has a graduate degree … how can [Davis] become so radical? A terrorist, that’s how she was labeled.”Rhodes also said Kathleen Cleaver brought a high level of media savvy to the “Black Power” movement.“Kathleen Cleaver was the Party’s communications secretary,” Dr. Rhodes said. “One of the things that is fascinating about Kathleen is that she is skilled in public relations. She staged photographs, but she didn’t provide the media with sensationalized story … and she was too deeply connected to the Black Panther Party.”Elaine Brown represents the next generation of Black Nationalists and the first bona-fide female leader of Black Panther Party, although she was never captured in the media gaze, and few people really know who she really is until her memoir was published, Rhodes said.Michelle Obama’s frame of being “dangerous and un-American” also reflects the fear of black women and black power, and Nicki Minaj is inheriting the legacy of women in the black power movement, Rhodes said.Tags: Angela Davis, Assata Shakur, Black Panthers, Black Power, Elaine Brown, Kathleen Cleaver, Media Glare, Michelle Obama, Nicki Minajlast_img read more

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NDSP, South Bend PD share student safety tips

first_imgAt Wednesday evening’s Student Safety Summit, local and campus police offered advice to students on how best to ensure their safety both on and off campus.The seven officers on the panel represented both the Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) and the South Bend Police Department (SBPD). Associate vice president of campus security Mike Seamon began the discussion by acknowledging the emphasis campus and local police place on student security.“Our top priority is the safety of all our faculty, staff, students and guests,” Seamon said.The panelists stressed the importance of using common sense to avoid unnecessarily dangerous situations. South Bend Police Captain Jeff Rynearson said taking preventative measures is essential.“Be smart. Have a plan in place before you go out,” Rynearson said.Walking alone is never a good idea, Rynearson said, and students should always have a plan to get home and a group or buddy to walk home with.“We have done a fantastic job of revitalizing the area, but there are still some higher crime areas, especially at night ” Rynearson said.In light of this, Lieutenant Tim Williams said it is imperative that students remain vigilant both on and off-campus.“Crime is all about opportunity,” Williams said. “We don’t want you to be an easy target.”According to NDSP Deputy Chief Keri Kei Shibata, the most prevalent crime on campus is theft of unattended property. Cases of forced entry in dorm room burglaries are extremely rare, so the best prevention is to lock doors.In the wake of recent active shooter situations like last week’s shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon, Shibata also discussed the measures that are in place should such a situation arise at Notre Dame. NDSP officers are trained annually on how to respond to active violence on campus, she said. The ND Alert system is also an essential part of the response to possible violence on campus as it allows information to reach students within seconds, she said.St. Joseph County Sheriff Mike Grzegorek spoke about basic safety knowledge for off-campus students. He said in addition to keeping doors and windows locked, keeping curtains drawn to prevent people from looking into homes is an often-overlooked safety measure. He said reaching out to neighbors can also be a useful step in protecting home when you are not there.“Build strong relationships with your neighbors so that when you are gone, they can help,” Grzegorek said.The panelists ended their presentation by emphasizing the importance of looking out for others in the community.“The best way to promote safety is for everyone to help each other,” Williams said.Rynearson stressed the importance of students using their instincts when it comes to personal safety.“If you feel something in your gut, don’t go into that situation,” Rynearson said. “We all have a sixth sense, so use it.”Tags: NDSP, SBPD, student safetylast_img read more

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Professor discusses alternative perspective to dictatorships

first_imgProfessor Graeme Gill gave a lecture in the Hesburgh Center on Tuesday about famous dictators Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong.Gill, who specializes in Soviet and Russian politics, used the two famous dictators to make an argument against common perception of how dictators rule. Authoritarian and dictatorial rule are usually characterized as arbitrary and uncontrolled with power bestowed on one person rather than an institution or collective governing body. Gill argued that dictatorships have far more rules and structure than previously thought, using examples the regimes of Mao and Stalin to support his argument.“Ever since Aristotle, people have been interested in trying to distinguish between political systems,” Gill said. At the beginning of his lecture, Gill set out the criteria he uses to analyze and understand the structure of a government or political system. Gill focused on two different categories of rules. The first category he termed “decision rules” and the second he called “comportment.” Decision rules are the rules of a political system which govern who, in the case of an executive, or what, in the case of a legislative or other collective government body, make decisions for the system as a whole. Comportment rules were defined as rules that had to do with how people — especially oligarchs and the close colleagues of the dictators being looked at — within a political system were expected to behave, they outline what things were acceptable or unacceptable to do such as criticize or even oppose the person in charge.  After defining these concepts, Gill applied them to Stalin and Mao’s regimes in order to gain insight into how they worked. In both the Soviet Union and the early People’s Republic of China, Stalin and Mao both became the undisputed executive leaders of their countries. Mao did so by virtue of his position as the chief leader of the communist revolution, and Stalin did so by outmaneuvering and eliminating political competition after Vladimir Lenin’s death to become head of the country’s Communist Party. Though Mao and Stalin were definitely their countries’ leaders, there also existed political institutions called the “Politburo,” which was ostensibly the chief policy-making committees for their respective countries.   “The key decision-making body in the system atrophy over time,” Gill said. In the Soviet Union, the Politburo was convened less and less as Stalin’s time in power went on. In the People’s Republic of China, Mao eventually replaced the Politburo with a Standing Committee made up of a few key policymakers. Gill argued that this atrophy of the official political decision-making institutions did not mean that the dictators were making all policy decisions, but rather that they also relied heavily on the oligarchy that surrounded the dictatorship. Both Stalin and Mao had neither the time, expertise or inclination to make every decision for their countries, Gill said. In order to effectively govern they consulted on issues and discussed policy plans regularly with colleges that made up the country’s elite. Gill went on to demonstrate that these members of the oligarchy around Stalin and Mao wielded significant autonomy over specific topics and policy. In Stalin’s case, especially later in his life, he spent a lot of time on vacation and though he had final say on all policy decisions, those decisions were being made by the circle of oligarchs Stalin was close to.“What’s quite clear is that they [governing oligarchs] knew they had autonomy but when they sought to things, they were always aware of the fact that Uncle Joe had the final say,” Gill said. With this degree of autonomy of the oligarchy, there also seemed to be a precedent for discussion or even criticism of policies that the dictators supported. Gill said the political elite were not explicitly prohibited from or guaranteed to be punished for disagreeing with their leader, provided the criticism was not perceived as an overstep or challenge to the dictator’s authority. “By and large, criticism of policy was fine provided it remained within certain guidelines and that it did not call Mao, or Mao’s position, into question,” Gill said.Gill ended his lecture by highlighting the fact that in the dictatorships of Mao and Stalin, while each wielded enormous power, there did seem to be a set of precedents or loose rules that structured the way the system worked. This perspective shows that dictatorships have a far more intricate structure than the common perception of them as a system where one strongman wield absolute power and makes all decisions. Tags: dictatorship, Graeme Gill, Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedonglast_img read more

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Professor explores meaning of Introductory Rites in final ‘Heritage of Hospitality’ lecture

first_imgAt the fourth and final installment of Saint Mary’s “Heritage of Hospitality” lecture series, Dr. Tony Alonso, a professor of theology at Emory University, spoke on the Introductory Rites of the Catholic Mass.Beginning with an explanation of the Introductory Rites, Alonso said that the Roman Missal — the rulebook — highlights what these rites will achieve.“The general instruction articulates the following bold hopes for what the Introductory Rites of the Catholic Mass are supposed to do,” Alonso said. “It says that the Introductory Rites of the Mass are meant to ensure the faithful establish communion, dispose themselves properly and to celebrate the Eucharist worthily.”Alonso said the ways in which the Introductory Rights of the Eucharist shape us in the hospitality of God demand that we also take seriously the way our hands also shape the liturgy. “It demands that we also take seriously the ways in which the bold hopes we have for the Eucharist don’t always take root in us in the ways we hope or the ways we intend,” he said. The Introductory Rites have never been primarily about the entrance of the priests or the ministers into the liturgical space, Alonso said, but about the entire community being ritually gathered together by God.“Each of the gestures, words, musical moments and movements are intended to open our eyes to recognize the presence of God in one another, in Word and in Eucharist, and in turn recognize that love in a world so loved by God,” Alonso said. Alonso then introduced three challenges to realizing the fullness of God’s hospitality in the Introductory Rites: the belief that the Rites will accomplish in us something that is happening nowhere else in our community or in our lives, a lack of preparation that manifests as a lack of presence and a failure to tend to the whole in a way that ends up creating fragmentation rather than establishing communion.“We must let the Introductory Rites and liturgy shape us, but we must also shape the Introductory Rites and liturgy,” he said. “By doing these things, we can become truly hospitable.” After Alonso spoke, sophomore Jackie Rojas and Sr. Adria Connors reflected on the hospitality of the Church and its community. Rojas said she liked the idea of having work that needs to be done outside of the liturgy.“I think it really has been my experience, especially in my hometown of El Paso, that there is so much attentiveness to human relationships and just to the community in general,” she said. “There have been many times when I first meet a new member of the parish during Mass, and our relationship continues to grow outside of celebrating the liturgy during different events and encounters.” Rojas said she believes cultivating a relationship outside of the Mass makes the celebration of the liturgy more special.Connors said she hopes people come away from the Mass carrying something that will help them continue hospitality. “There is an awareness that liturgy is life,” she said. “Life is not a compartment. Life is a permeated existence. That permeation, if I can live into that, is what enhances and enables that hospitality as well.”Tags: Catholic Mass, heritage of hospitality, hospitality, Introductory Rites, Mass, Theologylast_img read more

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SMC to host virtual career fair, encourages students to reach out to employers remotely

first_imgSaint Mary’s Career Crossings Office is hosting its annual career fair Thursday from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Adapting to new COVID-19 regulations, this year’s fair has become a virtual event.Stacie Jeffirs, director of the Career Crossings Office, said employers appreciate the background that Saint Mary’s students bring to their interviews.“[Employers] love Saint Mary’s students,” she said. “They are looking for more diversity and women in the workplace and being an all women’s college fits really well into that.”Jeffirs is hopeful the virtual fair will impact students in a positive way. She believes being online eliminates the pressure of interviewing in person.“Usually you show up for the fair and walk up to the employer and pitch yourself, but with virtual, there is no “pitch” per say,” she said. “You submit your resume and they will make their selections.”Being online removes barriers that may have made students hesitant in the past, but students still need to prepare themselves for the fair, Jeffirs said.“I recommend and encourage students to treat that Zoom as a pitch, why you submitted, interests, strengths, how this is an opportunity,” she said.Jeffirs said being virtual does comes with some new obstacles for her office.“[The] biggest challenges are the systems, how to get them up and running,” Jeffirs said. “[The administration] mostly just have to take it step by step and day by day to adjust to tweaks troubleshoot, and a lot of things we’ve experienced [in the past]. Being patient with both the school and the employers is important in order for the program to be successful.”Sophomore education major Emily Stross said the career fair can be a beneficial tool for planning for her future career.“I know it’s early to start looking for jobs, but being ahead of the curve is just something that will help me stand out,” Stross said.Stross is hopeful the connections she made previously during her fieldwork experience will help her land a job early outside school. However, she wants to keep herself open to all future options.“It also is helping me explore my options. I hope to work for a school in Ohio when I graduate, but options change and having these options open to me just make me feel more comfortable for the future.”Jeffirs emphasized students can still make connections to employers after the fair is over.“Some of [the employers] might be scheduling outside hours,” she said. “Submit resumes to the positions they have posted and the employers can link with you after the fair.”Tags: career fair, COVID-19, Saint Mary’s Career Crossings Office, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

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Democrats Tab Jamestown Native To Challenge Goodell For Office

first_imgAssemblyman Goodell debates the one-house budget resolution on the Assembly Floor in 2011. Image courtesy: NYAssembly.gov.JAMESTOWN – Local Democrats have selected Christina Cardinale, a Jamestown sales and marketing professional, to challenge Assemblyman Andy Goodell for the state’s 150th assembly seat.Chautauqua County Democratic Committee Chair Norm Green said that the party filed its paperwork Monday officially naming Cardinale as the party choice.“Christina Cardinale will be making her own official announcement shortly,” said Green. “She is an impressive candidate and I am convinced she will run a dynamic campaign in what will be an interesting election year with the pandemic.”The 2020 Democratic ballot for Chautauqua County voters will include president/vice president; Tracy Mitrano, NY23 Congress; Frank Puglisi, 57th State Senate; Christina Cardinale, 150th NY Assembly; Richard Morrisroe, County Executive Vacancy; District Attorney Patrick Swanson; Philp Collier, District 1 County Legislature Vacancy; and Zachery Agett, County Legislature District 10 Vacancy. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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New York Launches Early Voting For Primary Elections

first_imgMGN Image.ALBANY — Over the weekend, New York State launched early voting for the first time ever in a primary in the state.Early voting runs through June 21, before taking a day off ahead of the June 23 primary.New Yorkers can cast ballots at select polling locations under a law that passed last year, when the state joined 38 others with some form of early voting.In Chautauqua County, voters wishing to cast an early ballot in the Democrat Presidential Primary or Town of Busti Republican Primary can do so by visiting the county’s Board of Election Offices in Mayville. The state first rolled out early voting in November, and has since worked to smooth out issues including the location of polling booths in schools.Voters can also vote by absentee ballots, which can be postmarked by June 23. The state this year sent every registered voter a postage-paid application for an absentee ballot and allowed all New Yorkers to vote absentee because of the COVID-19 pandemic.For more information on early voting in Chautauqua County, visit chqgov.com/board-of-elections/Early-Voting-Information.The Associated Press contributed to this report. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Chautauqua County DA Says Judges Need More Bail Discretion

first_imgFile image by Justin Gould/ WNY News Now.MAYVILLE — Chautauqua County District Attorney Patrick Swanson says modifications to the New York State bail reform statue are not enough to fix the issues previously discussed by law enforcement and prosecutors around the state.Swanson tells WNYNewsNow that the changes technically began Thursday throughout the state. He says he believes the changes are a good start, but more action needs to be taken.“There are some additions to what we can get bail on, compared to what the law was, that I would say are positive developments,” Swanson said. “But, ultimately, my hope is, somewhere down the road, that the realization that we need to give the judges discretion back, is what we really need.”Swanson says that any crime that is alleged to have caused the death of another individual now qualifies for bail as part of the statute. The prosecutor adds that includes second-degree manslaughter, which was previously ineligible for bail as part of the original statute that took effect Jan. 1. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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