Rob Zombie, Marilyn Manson Announce Co-Headlining Summer Tour

first_imgRob Zombie and Marilyn Manson have announced their co-headlining Twins of Evil: Hell Never Dies Tour 2019, marking the duo’s third outing together. The North American tour will see the spooky rockers on the road together for the majority of July and August.Rob Zombie and Marilyn Manson will open up their tour with a performance at Baltimore, MD’s Royal Farms Arena on July 9th, followed by stops at Allentown, PA’s PPL Center (7/10); Huntington, WV’s Big Sandy Superstore Arena (7/12); Cincinnati, OH’s Riverbend Music Center (7/13); Evansville, IN’s Ford Center (7/14); Rockford, IL’s BMO Harris Bank Center (7/16); and Bonner Springs, KS’s Providence Medical Center Amphitheater (7/17); followed by festival appearances at Oshkosh, WI’s Rock USA on July 19th and Cadott, WI’s Rock Fest on July 20th.Zombie and Manson will continue their tour with a performance at Council Bluffs, IA’s WestFair Amphitheatre on July 21st, followed by stops at Sioux Falls, SD’s Denny Sanford Premier Center (7/23); Bismarck, ND’s Bismarck Event Center (7/24); Billings, MT’s Rimrock Auto Arena (7/25); Vancouver, BC’s Rogers Arena (8/4); Saskatoon, SK’s SaskTel Center (8/6); Winnipeg, MB’s Bell MTS Place (8/7); Fargo, ND’s Fargodome (8/9); Cedar Rapids, IA’s US Cellular Center (8/10); Fort Wayne, IN’s Allen County Coliseum (8/11); Grand Rapids, MI’s Van Andel Arena (8/13); London, ON’s Budweiser Gardens (8/14); Ottawa, ON’s Richcraft Live at Canadian Tire Centre (8/16); Quebec, QC’s Videotron Centre (8/17); and a tour-closing performance at Gilford, NH’s Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion on August 18th.According to a press release, Zombie will release a new album this year, although no title or release date has been announced. Manson is also working on a new album, but no specifics were given.Tickets for Zombie and Manson’s summer tour go on sale this Friday, February 22nd via Live Nation.Rob Zombie and Marilyn Manson 2019 North American Tour:07/09 – Baltimore, MD @ Royal Farms Arena07/10 – Allentown, PA @ PPL Center07/12 – Huntington, WV @ Big Sandy Superstore Arena07/13 – Cincinnati, OH @ Riverbend Music Center07/14 – Evansville, IN @ Ford Center07/16 – Rockford, IL @ BMO Harris Bank Center07/17 – Bonner Springs, KS @ Providence Medical Center Amphitheater07/19 – Oshkosh, WI @ Rock USA *07/20 – Cadott, WI @ Rock Fest *07/21 – Council Bluffs, IA @ WestFair Amphitheatre07/23 – Sioux Falls, SD @ Denny Sanford Premier Center07/24 – Bismarck, ND @ Bismarck Event Center07/25 – Billings, MT @ Rimrock Auto Arena08/04 – Vancouver, BC @ Rogers Arena08/06 – Saskatoon, SK @ SaskTel Center08/07 – Winnipeg, MB @ Bell MTS Place08/09 – Fargo, ND @ Fargodome08/10 – Cedar Rapids, IA @ US Cellular Center08/11 – Fort Wayne, IN @ Allen County Coliseum08/13 – Grand Rapids, MI @ Van Andel Arena08/14 – London, ON @ Budweiser Gardens08/16 – Ottawa, ON @ Richcraft Live at Canadian Tire Centre08/17 – Quebec, QC @ Videotron Centre08/18 – Gilford, NH @ Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion* = festival dateView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Led Zeppelin To Reunite As Replacement For The Rolling Stones At Jazz Fest

first_imgDISCLAIMER [4/2/19]: We had some fun on April Fool’s day. Led Zeppelin is not, in fact, playing at Jazz Fest.UPDATE [4/4/19]: Fleetwood Mac will fill in for The Rolling Stones at Jazz Fest. Head here for details.UPDATE [4/8/19]: Fleetwood Mac has canceled their Jazz Fest appearance along with the rest of their upcoming tour dates as Stevie Nicks recovers from the flu. Widespread Panic has been added to the Jazz Fest lineup as their replacement. Head here for details.Over the weekend, news broke that The Rolling Stones postponed their upcoming U.S./Canada tour because Mick Jagger “needs medical treatment.” Doctors have advised Mick that he is “expected to make a complete recovery so that he can get back on stage as soon as possible.”Perhaps the biggest fallout from the Stones’ postponed tour is the cancelation of their highly-anticipated performance at the 50th New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival on May 2nd. The festival even made changes to its long-running format to accommodate The Rolling Stones’ performance, adding an additional day with a separate, more expensive ticket which quickly sold out. In the wake of the cancellation, fans have been left to wonder who might fill the headlining vacancy—and whether or not a passable substitute for one of the greatest bands in history even exists, particularly on such short notice.Today, the festival’s organizers announced their solution, and it surely does not disappoint: Led Zeppelin will reunite to headline on Thursday, May 2nd at New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.Led Zeppelin’s Jazz Fest performance will mark the band’s first official performance since the December 10, 2007 show at London’s 02 Arena, immortalized by the lauded 2012 concert film/live album Celebration Day. Much like the Celebration Day reunion, Led Zeppelin’s Jazz Fest performance will feature surviving members Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, and John Paul Jones, as well as Jason Bonham, the son of late original drummer John Bonham.The reunion comes as a shock to Led Zeppelin fans everywhere. Until now, the band seemingly had no interest in reuniting. Their 50th anniversary in 2018 came and went without a live reunion, though they did mark the milestone with a variety of promotional releases including an illustrated book, various apparel ventures, a special re-issue of The Song Remains The Same, and more.Led Zeppelin reportedly had no plans to play together again, but when the Stones had to cancel, it created a unique opportunity for the band to play a proper 50th-anniversary show. In the (paraphrased) words of Mick Jagger, “You can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometime, you might find you get Led Zeppelin.’”Get well soon, Mick!April Fools!last_img read more

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Slash Featuring Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators Share Video For “Boulevard of Broken Hearts” [Watch]

first_imgSlash featuring Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators have shared a thrilling new music video for “Boulevard of Broken Hearts”, a track which appeared on the famous rock guitarist’s latest solo studio album, Living The Dream.The black-and-white video takes viewers across the pond and over to London, where the band is seen performing at the Eventim Apollo earlier this year back on February 20th. The video was directed by Dan Sturgess, who over the last few years has been at the helm of videos for other hard rock bands including Black Label Society and Alter Bridge, with the latter also featuring Slash’s current solo frontman, Myles Kennedy.Related: Watch Slash Surprise Young Guitarist Brandon ‘Taz’ Niederauer At ‘School Of Rock The Musical’ RehearsalIn addition to showing Slash and company performing “Boulevard of Broken Hearts”, the video also takes viewers outside the London venue where fans are seen waiting outside prior to the show underneath the lit marquee featuring the band’s name. Sturgess also captures a mix of backstage footage, with the band warming up before taking the stage in front of a sold-out audience. For the most part, the video is edited to slow-motion, which contrasts well alongside the song’s faster, high-energy feel. Shots of the band members rocking out and furiously playing their instruments are balanced by footage of fans having an equally wild time out in the audience.Fans can check out Slash’s new music video below.Slash ft. Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators – “Boulevard of Broken Hearts”[Video: Slash]The video’s arrival on Wednesday comes just a day after it was revealed that Slash’s other band, Guns N’ Roses, will headline both weekends of this year’s ACL Fest in Austin, TX come October. Slash featuring Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators will head out on their own run of summer tour dates in promotion of the new album beginning on July 15th in San Francisco.Fans can head over to Slash’s website for tour information and tickets.last_img read more

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Study: Competition from private schools boosts achievement and lowers costs

first_img Read Full Story New findings by Harvard Graduate School of Education Assistant Professor Martin West and University of Munich Professor Ludger Woessmann show that competition from private schools improves achievement for both public and private school students, and decreases overall spending on education.The study, which was featured in the August 2010 issue of the Economic Journal, systemically measured the causal impact of private school competition across countries. The researchers found that students in countries with higher proportions of children enrolled in private schools score higher on internationally comparable exams.“Our results suggest that students in public schools profit nearly as much from increased private school competition as do a nation’s students as a whole,” West and Woessman note. “Competition from private schools improves student achievement, and appears to do so for public school as well as private school students. And it produces these benefits while decreasing the total resources devoted to education, as measured by cumulative educational spending per pupil.”In order to determine whether competitive pressures from private schools increase the productivity of the school system as a whole, West and Woessmann analyzed Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) data on the mathematical, scientific, and reading literacy of nearly 220,000 students in 29 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. They also used PISA data on students’ background and the characteristics of each student’s school, including resource levels and whether the school is public or private.Read more about the study:last_img read more

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Lee Davenport, radar physicist, 95

first_imgLee L. Davenport, a pioneering radar physicist who has been credited for helping to bring an end to World War II, died on Sept. 30, of cancer in Greenwich, Conn.Davenport was born Dec. 31, 1915, in Schenectady, N.Y. He received a B.S. from Union College in 1937, an M.S. in 1940, and a Ph.D. in physics in 1946, both from the University of Pittsburgh.From 1940 to the end of World War II, Davenport was a research fellow at the MIT Radiation Laboratory, developing the revolutionary anti-aircraft system — known as microwave radar, or Signal Corp Radio #584 — that helped save England from the V1 buzz bombs.After the war Davenport received his doctorate for his design to remote control a missile over a radar beam. It was effectively the first guided missile, and mother of today’s drones.From 1946 to 1950 Davenport served as research fellow at Harvard and coordinated the building of the University’s 92-inch cyclotron, which was then the second-largest atom smasher in the world. Davenport also taught physics at Radcliffe College during his time at Harvard.Davenport later worked in private industry, becoming the chief scientist at GTE Laboratories before retiring in 1980.He is survived by his wife, Doris Moss; daughter Carol Davenport; stepsons, Craig and Clark Moss; three grandchildren; and five step-grandchildren.A memorial service to celebrate the life of Lee Davenport will be held Oct. 22 at 2 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, 108 Sound Beach Ave., Old Greenwich, Conn.last_img read more

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The designing woman

first_imgMost people would say that being able to do something they love for eight hours a day, five days a week, is a rare gift. For Jessica Brilli, it’s an everyday reality. The graphic designer uses her passion for art to inform the visually alluring material she creates for Radcliffe’s Institute for Advanced Study.And when she’s not at work, she is often at home in her studio creating whimsical and evocative oil paintings.The fruits of Brilli’s professional and personal labors are around every corner in Fay House, Radcliffe’s newly renovated airy office and meeting space.On a hallway table, publications, fliers, and brochures that announce institute programs and lectures beckon passersby, displaying Brilli’s creative designs. Next to Brilli’s desk on the building’s sunny third floor, a giant image of a reclining Julia Child smiles casually back at the viewer. The picture is part of a promotional poster she designed for the institute’s recent symposium on the iconic chef.“These were still lifes of these dormant objects, and I realized I could make it a much bigger, broader thing, so I just kind of went for it,” said Brilli, with one of her pieces. Photo by Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer“Pretty much anything visual here, I had something to do with producing,” said Brilli, a New York native who began her Harvard career helping to design The Harbus, the independent, student-run newspaper at the Harvard Business School. She made the jump to Radcliffe in 2004 and worked as a production coordinator before transitioning to graphic designer in 2010.The products of Brilli’s other artistic talents adorn the building’s walls. On its second floor hangs her painting of July 4 fireworks exploding over a rooftop in Boston’s Back Bay. Just down the hall, Brilli’s work “Zenith,” showing an old clock radio painted in soft gray and blue hues, decorates the office of Radcliffe Dean Lizabeth Cohen.Brilli scours flea markets and eBay for items of inspiration, such as this 1942 Kodak Baby Brownie Special camera.“We have three of Jess’ paintings in the dean’s office,” said Cohen. “From the minute I encountered her work at a staff art show before I even became dean, I loved it for how she takes ordinary things and places — an old clock radio, a manual typewriter, a highway entrance ramp, a fireworks display in a night sky — and gets you to appreciate it anew, to delight in its texture, its colors, and its form. I will never tire of the paintings that I look at every day at work.”More of Brilli’s artwork will go on display Nov. 3 in the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Gutman Library. The show, which will be on view through Nov. 25, will feature 10 works from her collection titled “Static,” consisting of a series of still-life images of everyday items from the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s, such as typewriters, telephones, and radios.Her attachment to old radios provided inspiration for the new show. “I’ve always loved them. They are beautifully designed objects,” said Brilli, who bought her first classic radio, a 1940s Philco, on eBay several years ago. One radio painting led to another. Soon, she also started capturing images of old cameras on canvas.“These were still lifes of these dormant objects, and I realized I could make it a much bigger, broader thing, so I just kind of went for it.” A local weekend flea market became her regular haunt. There she scoured the stalls for her new “subjects,” like a 1942 Kodak Baby Brownie Special camera, and a baby blue Smith Corona typewriter from 1960.She describes her style as a type of contemporary “loose realism,” one that grew out of her efforts to capture more lifelike images and her frustration with “trying to get it exactly right all the time.” As a result, her work is grounded in reality, yet gently gravitates toward the ethereal and abstract. “I find there is a lot of freedom in interpreting it your own way.”“I’ve always loved them. They are beautifully designed objects,” said Brilli, who bought her first classic radio, a 1940s Philco, online.Interested in drawing and painting from a young age, Brilli attended the University of Rhode Island, where she earned a degree in fine arts. Like many an undergraduate trying to find her way, she experimented artistically. She found watercolor paint too finicky, and that acrylic paint “dries too quickly.” So she turned to oil paint, which hardens more slowly, and allows an artist the flexibility to change her mind.“I find it to be very forgiving. You can wipe it out and correct it and layer on top of it. Acrylic seems very final.”Brilli doesn’t like to force the creative process. She paints an hour or two at a time in her home studio, and makes sure to put the brush down when she gets tired, instead of laboring on to the point of frustration. “I’ve realized that if I don’t feel like doing it, I should really stop.”That self-awareness extends to Brilli’s workplace, where she feels fortunate to be able to combine passion with job seamlessly.“I just feel really lucky to be able to do something creative at work. I love doing both — I love painting, and I love doing graphic design. So I feel very blessed to have a job that I like so much, and an outside hobby that ties into it. Both things really inspire each other.”“Static,” works by Jessica Brilli, will be on exhibit at the Monroe E. Gutman Library, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Nov. 3-25. An artist’s reception will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Nov. 8.last_img read more

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‘Brainbow,’ version 2.0

first_imgThe breakthrough technique that allowed scientists to obtain one-of-a-kind, colorful images of the myriad connections in the brain and nervous system is about to get a significant upgrade.A group of Harvard researchers, led by Joshua Sanes, the Jeff C. Tarr Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Paul J. Finnegan Family Director, Center for Brain Science, and Jeff Lichtman, the Jeremy R. Knowles Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Santíago Ramón y Cajal Professor of Arts and Sciences, has made a host of technical improvements in the “Brainbow” imaging technique. Their work is described in a May 5 paper in Nature Methods.First described in 2007, the system combines three fluorescent proteins — one red, one blue, and one green — to label different cells with as many as 90 colors. By studying the resulting images, researchers were able to begin to understand how the millions of neurons in the brain are connected.“‘Brainbow’ generated beautiful images of a kind we had never been able to obtain before, but it was difficult in some ways,” said Sanes, who also serves as director of the Center for Brain Science.“These modifications aim to overcome some of the more problematic features of the original genetic constructs,” Lichtman said. “Lead author Dawen Cai, a research associate in our labs, worked hard and creatively to find ways to make the ‘Brainbow’ colors brighter, more variable, and useable in situations where the original gene constructs were hard to implement. Our first look at these animals suggests that these improvements are fantastic.”The cells in the cerebellum of a mouse show up in an array of colors, including red, pink, yellow, green, cyan, blue, and brown.Among the challenges faced by researchers using the original method, Sanes said, was the chance that certain colored proteins would bleach out faster than others.“If one color bleaches faster than the others, you start with a ‘Brainbow,’ but by the time you’re done imaging, you might just have a ‘blue-bow,’ because the red and yellow bleach too fast,” he said.Sanes said that some colors also were too dim, causing problems in the imaging process, while in other cases the protein didn’t fill the whole neuron evenly enough, or there was an overabundance of a certain color in an image.“What we decided to do was to make the next generation of ‘Brainbow,’” Sanes said. “We systematically set out to look at these problems. We looked at a whole range of fluorescent proteins to find the ones that were brightest and wouldn’t bleach as much, and we developed new transgenic methods to avoid the predominance of a particular color.”The researchers also explored new ways to create “Brainbow” images, including using viruses to introduce fluorescent proteins into cells.The advantage of the new technique, Sanes said, is it offers researchers the chance to target certain parts of the brain and better understand how neurons radiate out to connect with other brain regions. Ultimately, he said, he hopes that other researchers are able to apply the techniques outlined in the paper in the same way that they expanded on the first “Brainbow” method.“People adapted the method to study a number of interesting questions in other tissues to examine cellular relationships and cell lineages in kidney and skin cells,” he said. “It was also used to examine the nervous system in animals like zebrafish and C. elegans. With these new tools, I think we’ve taken the next step.”last_img read more

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The ACA’s crucial prevention component

first_img Read Full Story Regardless of the political wranglings around the Affordable Care Act (ACA), funding public health prevention efforts must continue, said HSPH Dean Julio Frenk in an op-ed in the Boston Globe on Oct. 2, 2013. He notes that spending on prevention within the ACA has already been reduced from a $15 billion commitment to $10 billion.“Prevention may seem expensive, but in the long term it saves money,” said Frenk. “Consider that a scant 3 percent of current health care spending in the United States is now focused on prevention and public health, while a whopping 75 percent of health care costs are related to preventable conditions.”last_img read more

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Galileo’s reach

first_imgThere was talk of forgery and corruption in Harvard’s Rosovsky Hall Friday, but it didn’t spark an investigation. Rather, the corruption was of the heavens four centuries ago, while the forgery — of a document purportedly by Galileo — was uncovered in 2005.Scholars, artists, and musicians gathered at Harvard for a wide-ranging conference to mark the 400th anniversary of Galileo’s insights on sunspots.The event, organized by Peter Galison, the Joseph Pellegrino University Professor, aimed to humanize the famed Italian astronomer, considered a father of modern science, and detail the times in which he lived.Sunspots are known today to be extremely violent eruptions on the face of the sun caused by magnetic activity. Though they measure thousands of degrees, the spots are cooler than the surrounding areas. Associated coronal mass ejections can disrupt communications on Earth and intensify aurora activity.At the time of Galileo, however, it was widely assumed that the heavens were perfect, causing a great deal of resistance to the idea that the sun might be blemished.Galileo was a lute player to whom the arts were an important part of life, so the conference incorporated the arts to help explain his work. It featured a dramatic work by graduate students at the American Repertory Theater and a musical performance, “Galileo’s Muse.” Galileo grew up in a musical family — both his father and brother were lute players and composers — and his insights into the acceleration of gravity have been linked to his musical sensibilities.Aside from the role of the arts in Galileo’s life, the broad impact of his work was best reflected by a conference reaching across disciplines, Galison said.The drama, “The Greatest Witness,” was created by grad student Stephanie Dick, who assembled the reading from period poetry, a 1945 play about Galileo, and Galileo’s own writing.Though sunspots were observed before Galileo, he correctly explained what he saw, engaging in an ongoing argument with a Jesuit astronomer, Christoph Scheiner, who believed the spots were small planets passing across the face of the sun, a position that preserved the sun’s perfection.Among other subjects, speakers at the conference provided details of the argument with Scheiner, examined Galileo’s research during the key month of June 1612, and highlighted how the common use of pseudonyms at the time still complicates research.Galileo’s explanation that the spots were actually blemishes on the sun clashed with the Catholic Church’s firmly held belief that the heavens were perfect. These views added to his troubles with church over his insistence that Nicolaus Copernicus was correct: The Earth was not at the center of the universe, but, instead, revolved around the sun.“He went way beyond anything Copernicus imagined,” Galison said. “Galileo went out of his way to say you should take this seriously.”Among the speakers was Nick Wilding of Georgia State University, who in 2005 helped uncover the forgery of a document that had been attributed to Galileo. Wilding said the forgery was very good, but that tiny details — missed by earlier experts who had authenticated the document — gave it away. Wilding said that modern technology has proved an asset to forgers and presents trouble for historians.“We face a crisis as historians, as we deal with sources,” Wilding said. “We’re getting close-to-perfect forgeries.”The event was co-sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard, the Italian Consulate-General in Boston, Museo Galileo of Florence, the Office of the Dean of the Division of Arts and Humanities at Harvard, and the Italian engineering firm Trevi Icos, which has worked on several Harvard buildings, including the Fogg Museum, and the Northwest Lab building.last_img read more

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GSE dean debates online speech

first_imgShould schools punish students for online speech? That question, posed by Harvard Graduate School of Education (GSE) Dean James Ryan as part of his J-Term seminar, opened the doors to many more. Calling the issue “remarkably difficult” in terms of law and policy, Ryan pushed students to think deeply about issues regarding online speech facing courts and school officials today.“As you know, social media is pervasive; students communicate all the time online,” Ryan said. “Sometimes students say incredibly nasty things — beyond nasty — they harass, they torture other students through online postings, leading to a new term in our vocabulary: not just bullying, but cyberbullying.”The dilemma for many school officials is whether to intervene. Whether they do or don’t, schools may face liability — and existing laws may offer them little guidance.“The law is really unclear. What you won’t get out of this session is a bright-line rule about when schools can intervene or when they have to intervene because unfortunately the law is not yet settled,” Ryan said during a two-hour discussion in which he urged students to move past what the law already says. “The court has not yet issued a definite ruling about the rights of students in this context. The nice thing is it gives us an opportunity to think about what that rule would look like.”The class delved into cases examining student activity online, ranging from threats of physical harm to images of sexual acts to inappropriate messages about teachers. Through the lens of landmark cases dealing with schools and student speech, such as Tinker v. Des Moines and Bethel v. Fraser, the seminar wrestled with whether and how any of their findings could apply in today’s wired world.In the end, the students were divided. While some thought a line could be drawn based on place and timing — whether or not an offensive post was made during school hours, and from a computer on campus — others struggled with whether it mattered where the online speech originated, especially if it had potential to harm the school, staff, or students. “It’s always foreseeable that online speech could end up on campus,” Ryan reminded the class. Similar questions arose regarding the content of online speech. How is harm determined? If educators become monitors of speech, does that violate students’ First Amendment rights?“You see the problem, right? Schools don’t know what the rules are — that’s a problem,” Ryan said. “If you act, you might get sued. But it’s a problem if you don’t act and harm occurs, because you might get sued. So, what school officials would like most of all is clarity, and right now there is no clarity because the court has not spoken about what the rules should be.”While states have begun to set their own rules, in particular about cyberbullying, Ryan noted there was still time for school boards and courts to weigh in. The issue of online speech isn’t one that is likely to go away until it is decided by a higher court, which Ryan anticipates within the next five years.last_img read more

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