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Gala Coral changes board as new chief is appointed

first_img Tags: NULL KCS-content Gala Coral changes board as new chief is appointed whatsapp CASINO group Gala Coral yesterday announced the appointment of former Marks & Spencer director Carl Leaver as its new chief executive, to replace interim CEO and chairman Neil Goulden, who is leaving the company.Leaver was the high street retailer’s director of international, home and direct businesses until 2009, having previously worked for De Vere and Whitbread. The appointment came as Goulden also stepped aside as chairman. He is being replaced by retail veteran Rob Templeman, the Debenhams chief executive who was previously at Halfords and Homebase.In a note to clients, Seymour Pierce said: “Given recent speculation that he was leaving Debenhams, the fact that this is a non-executive role may reassure and confirm Mr Templeman’s commitment to Debenhams.The appointments will bring some much needed stability to Gala Coral after a period which has also included a financial restructuring. The company was acquired in January by a consortium of private equity groups including Apollo, Cerberus, Park Square and York Capital Management, which finished restructuring its £2.5bn debt during the summer – including a £200m cash injection from its new owners.Goulden took over the reins as interim chief executive abruptly in July when Dominic Harrison announced was leaving the group after six years to “seek new career opportunities”. Leaver’s arrival means all three of the UK’s leading bookmakers – Gala Coral, Ladbrokes and William Hill – have changed chief executive in the past two years.Goulden, who is being retained by the company in a consultancy role for the next three years, said: “I feel the time is now right to step down from the group. Having successfully led the group through its recent financial restructuring and helped to recruit a top-notch Chairman and CEO to work alongside our CFO, Gary Hughes, I know that I am leaving the company in good shape and in very capable hands.“I have been with Gala Coral for 10 years and have seen it grow from being Britain’s number two bingo operator into Britain’s number one gambling company, with 10 per cent of the UK market and over 3.5m active customers.” Show Comments ▼ Share whatsapp Monday 8 November 2010 9:10 pm More From Our Partners Man on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgLA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.com last_img read more

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Constitutional amendment could smooth legal betting in GA

first_img Georgia’s deputy legislative counsel, D. Stuart Morelli stated that an amendment to legalise sports betting in the state may not be required, but is preferable due to the ambiguity of the current situation.The statement came as part of Morelli’s advice to Senate Study Committee on Gaming and Pari-mutual Wagering on Horse Racing and Growing Georgia’s Equine Industry, which was established in April to study opportunities to regulate betting, gaming and horse racing in the state.  The committee held a hearing Tuesday (8 October) to further examine the issue.“Owing to the wording of the Georgia Constitution, reasonable arguments could be made on both sides of the question, and the ultimate success of an attempt to legalize sports betting without a constitutional amendment will come down to the roll of a dice,” Morelli said.Article I, Section II, Paragraph VIII of the constitution of Georgia explicitly prohibits certain forms of gambling, including pari-mutuel betting, casinos and lotteries other than the Georgia state lottery.Read more on iGB North America. Topics: Legal & compliance Sports betting Constitutional amendment could smooth legal betting in GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: US Georgia Legal & compliancecenter_img 10th October 2019 | By Daniel O’Boyle Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Georgia’s deputy legislative counsel, D. Stuart Morelli stated that an amendment to legalise sports betting in the state may not be required, but is preferable due to the ambiguity of the current situation.last_img read more

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Execucare MD to run the London Marathon

first_img  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Execucare MD to run the London Marathon Tagged with: Events Recruitment / people About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 19 April 2006 | News Stephen Perrett, Managing Director of charity recruitment specialists Execucare, will be running in this weekend’s London Marathon to raise funds for children’s charity Honeypot, using the online event services of Justgiving.com.Stephen is a trustee of the charity which provides a nurturing respite break in the New Forest every year for children who have lost their childhoods to domestic violence, poverty or neglect or the struggle of being a carer for a chronically sick or terminally ill family member.He is aiming to raise £5,000 from the run and has created an online donation page at Justgiving.com. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Property company seeks home for charity

first_img Tagged with: Ireland AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Property company seeks home for charity Howard Lake | 24 May 2006 | News  25 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis One of Ireland’s biggest estate agents is in the process of securing a three bed property for accommodation for parents as part of their fundraising for Temple Street Children’s Hospital in Dublin. Dublin has some of the most expensive housing in Europe, with house prices having increased by 40% in the last five years.A three bed house within 10 minutes walk of the hospital has been earmarked by the estate agency Sherry Fitzgerald for their ‘Your Home Away from Home’ project. Currently the choice for parents outside Dublin who want to stay close to their children receiving treatment at the hospital is either to stay overnight in a B&B or sleep in a camp bed.The Home Away from Home is part of a wider fundraising initiative for Temple Street Hospital by Sherry Fitzgerald. Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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New Chief Executive at Cats Protection

first_img  25 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis New Chief Executive at Cats Protection Hepburn said that he is keen to build on the links that Cats Protection has with other animal welfare organisations and wants to ensure the work of the charity is always of the highest possible standard.He became a cat owner when he bought his first home and has owned two Cats Protection cats in the past. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img Howard Lake | 2 April 2007 | News Tagged with: Management Peter Hepburn starts today as the new Chief Executive of Cats Protection, based at the charity’s NationalCat Centre in Sussex.Hepburn has worked in the charity sector for over 22 years at organisations including Christian Aid, Stonham Housing Association, York St. John University and mostrecently Victim Support, where he was Deputy Chief Executive.He began his career in the private sector, where he become a company director in an international group of companies operating in the construction industry. Over the years he has been an active volunteer for a variety of charities, carrying out rolesranging from property care and maintenance, door-to-door fundraisingcollections to being a Trustee. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Priority status for Foynes-Limerick scheme

first_imgFacebook O’Donnell Welcomes Major Enhancement Works for Castletroy Neighbourhood Park #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Linkedin Email RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp LIMERICK City and County Council has commenced the procurement of engineering consultancy services for a proposed new road linking the Port of Foynes with the M7/N18 at Limerick City.The N69 national secondary road currently connects Foynes to Limerick along 32 kilometres of single carriageway.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up However, the Foynes to Limerick road improvement scheme will provide improved access to the port and support its envisaged expansion as outlined in the government’s National Ports Policy.Upgrading the road infrastructure to the Port of Foynes from Limerick is also a key recommendation in the Shannon Foynes Port Company Vision 2041, published earlier this year.Council Cathaoirleach John Sheahan said: “This road scheme and the expansion of the Port of Foynes have the potential to support sustainable economic growth and deliver employment for Limerick and the Mid West region.“I acknowledge that this project is at a very early stage but I am heartened that despite the economic downturn that investment in new transport infrastructure continues to be made.”Paul Crowe, director of Travel and Transportation with Limerick City and County Council revealed that engineering consultants will be appointed this year, while a preferred route is to be selected in 2014He added that a “major consultation process with the public, landowners and other key stakeholders will be undertaken”. TAGSfoynesLimerick City and County CouncilMusic Limerick Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday center_img NewsPriority status for Foynes-Limerick schemeBy John Keogh – September 5, 2013 1325 Advertisement Limerick’s O’Connell Street Revitalisation Works to go ahead Print Previous articleAfter Dark – Launch of 95 Fashion momentsNext articleFour remain in hurling hunt John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Twitter Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boylast_img read more

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The Best Way Forward Is The Tech Way Forward

first_imgColumnsThe Best Way Forward Is The Tech Way Forward Talha Abdul Rahman9 April 2020 12:27 AMShare This – xWhen we say that technology is here to stay – we should be looking at designing a system that can eliminate (almost) biases in all form.”Technology is here to stay”, the Chief Justice of India is reported to have said this during a hearing in the Supreme Court of India on 6th April 2020. The Supreme Court of India’s responsive step to make itself more accessible than ever during these hard times is laudable and deployment of technology for the same is a significant step forward. Given that the action was responsive…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?Login”Technology is here to stay”, the Chief Justice of India is reported to have said this during a hearing in the Supreme Court of India on 6th April 2020. The Supreme Court of India’s responsive step to make itself more accessible than ever during these hard times is laudable and deployment of technology for the same is a significant step forward. Given that the action was responsive rather than pro-active, the Supreme Court certainly did pretty well. On 6th April 2020, the Supreme Court of India passed many directions and guidelines for functioning through video conferencing during Covid is to ensure that not only the apex court but the courts pan-India makes justice accessible during the lockdown. For now, the directions issued by the Supreme Court are confined to the present situation. In this brief article, I make three points concerning how technology ought to evolve going forward. First, given that technology is here to stay, we need to find a guiding rationale or objective for it – around which we can develop and deploy the system. Second concerns the adaptation of technology that is inclusive; and third is its adherence to the rule of law. The rationale for Using Technology Technology sustains in any area only if it helps us to perform the existing tasks in a “better” manner which were not possible with traditional ways. Continuing a regulated use of electronic means for filing, listing and hearing of cases before the Supreme Court (and other courts) has the potential of addressing present issues. However, before it is decided to implement technology rather widely, we must find a guiding rationale or rational objective for doing so. The guiding rationale would restrict haphazard deployment of technology and would ensure that limited means are applied proportionately. Introduction of technology by itself cannot be a rational objective – it is a means and not an end. For now, it appears from the directions passed by the Supreme Court that High Court has to operationalise video hearings during the lockdown. For now, the guiding rationale is only “social distancing” – which is a rational and fair objective to pursue in these times. Going forward, what could be this rational objective? Could it be to ensure paper-less adjudication? Could it be to speed up the process of adjudication? Could it to add “quality” to adjudication ? Could it be to “discipline” the lawyers into not making verbose and lengthy submissions? Could it be to make filing before the Supreme Court of India accessible in the farthest corners of India? Could it be to allow even a lawyer at a remote place to argue a matter before the Supreme Court of India? Finding of this rational objective or an “overriding objective” (a phrase I borrow from the English Civil Procedure Rules) is essential because this will ensure that all subsequent development and deployment of technology – in years following 2020 by subsequent Chief Justices of India remains in conformity with this objective. For example, E-filing was introduced by then Chief Justice Khehar but is being actually put to use by the present Chief Justice of India. Surely, Justice Khehar had not thought of this back in May, 2017. For instance, if saving paper is one of the “overriding objective” – then technology that would be made available in future would have to ensure that no print outs are needed at any stage. In the beginning, it may slow down those who are used to reading on paper or arguing from a “paper-book” – but we would have to put up with that to achieve the overriding objective. If that is the objective, at some stage we would have to also give up on physical filing of affirmed affidavits, vakalatnama and certified copies of impugned orders. In any system of adjudication, speed, cost and accuracy are three competing virtues. You can achieve two, but never all three – that is an aspirational stage. At the intersection of these three virtues lies that ideal system of adjudication that everyone seeks to achieve within their specific limitations. No system is perfect and that is why it is accepted that even “the Supreme Court is right only because it is final”. However, having said that all effort must be to achieve an objective. “Justice” is too abstract a notion to design a technological system around it – but yes, you could design and develop a system that is fairly accurate, fairly fast and does not cost disproportionately. When I say “fairly accurate”, I understand that, like in all system of adjudication – there is always an element of subjectivity. However, it is not the subjectivity that is the problem – it is the lack of objectivity when it is required that is the problem – it is biases that are the problem. Therefore, when we say that technology is here to stay – we should be looking at designing a system that can eliminate (almost) biases in all form, is accessible – in all sense of the word, and allows for accurate decision making as far as possible. (see Zuckerman, A.A., 1995. A reform of civil procedure: rationing procedure rather than access to justice. Journal of Law and Society, 22(2), pp.155-188.) Given our systemic concerns, our immediate concern should be to handle docket explosion using technology but without outsourcing decision making to an algorithm or without allowing a technical person to decide who will access the court and on what terms. In my experience as an advocate on record, person sitting at the defects counter or in the listing section is sometimes more powerful than the Chief Justice of India – who can (normally) pass orders when the matter gets listed. So, there are many hurdles to cross before matter is listed and as I will show even after the matter is listed. For example of “before listing”, the present system of “mentioning for listing” or requests for “not to be deleted” is a response on account of an algorithm that prioritises matters depending on the nature of listing orders passed by the court. Hence, lawyers before the Court need to make that extra effort to ensure that some date or a week or a month is fixed while passing an order just so that their matter does not disappear in the labyrinth of computer shown dates. (See Rule 39, Chapter XIII (Listing of Cases), Supreme Court Handbook 2017, extracted below) The listing algorithm that is presently used in Supreme Court seems to have no regard to the subject matter of the case – and rightly so. Perhaps, if we are talking of making technology a permanent feature in the judicial process (not just handling administrative work), there is a need to revisit existing tools that are procedural or administrative but affect the substantive aspects. Listing being one such aspect. The other aspect of hurdles “after the listing”, for example is today’s (i.e. 07th April 2020) fiasco of exclusion of certain advocates (like yours truly) from hearing of their Intervention Applications that were listed in the cause-list and they were also on the WhastApp Group created for coordinating today’s hearing. There were many lawyers in the WhatsApp Group whose names were shown in the cause list for Respondents or like me who had filed Intervention Application which were listed who were not sent the video link to join the “e-court room”. However, some other similarly placed lawyers were sent the link to join “e-court room”. This simply means that a technical person, perhaps constrained by the available technology was compelled to push out a few lawyers (on his discretion) to prevent “over crowding” of the “e-court room”. These are all cases of “extreme urgency”, and that is why they are listed. Could we say that choosing to send link to one and not to another lawyer is akin to a technical calls like the Italian doctors choosing to save a certain COVID patient and letting certain go – except here the doctor does not know the vitals of the patient? Fortunately, for some other reason, the Supreme Court of India did not pass any effective orders today. But in cases of “extreme urgency,” even no order could have its implications. If technology is here to stay, we need to fix these problems. I must clarify that I have no grievance against the technical person – and I am confident that he is doing his best in good faith under a very stressed system that has been stitched together to provide to this country a functioning Supreme Court. My compliments to him. What I want to highlight is that we do need to equip him with better technology and must do so without any further delay. This is more so because the Supreme Court expects High Courts to follow its precedent, and the Supreme Court has always been a beacon of hope. On boarding everyone An ideal system of adjudication has to be inclusive. Our system of adjudication attempts to inclusive. In fact, by referring to the phrase “Access to Justice”, the Supreme Court in its order dated 06h April 2020 has suggested to the High Courts to ensure that the system is inclusive. What is the meaning of the word “inclusive”? To our mind, it means that the future technological system has to ensure that no person, who would have otherwise accessed the courts, is left out. When I use the word “person” – I don’t mean only litigant – I mean everyone and everything that comes with a litigant’s case. Therefore, if a litigant wishes to engage an octogenarian lawyers whom he trusts – he must not be compelled to choose another younger lawyer only because that octogenarian lawyer finds himself struggling to use technology. One can argue that this is what happened when courts made computer typed copies mandatory over ordinary type-written copies, and this is inevitable. However, I don’t think that our system needs to be insensitive to the needs of the members of the bar – who thus far never required to learn computer? One would also need the clerks to catch up with technology and provide hand-holding there. One does not need technology alone – one needs it with empathy –virtue men adorning black & white robes are often alleged to be lacking. Of course, in these hard times – the first casualty of any law and order situation is internet connection itself. I wonder how the courts would deal with that situation? Adherence to the rule of law It is commendable that despite these challenging times when human beings are compelled to avoid each other, the Supreme Court of India and other High Court have set up mechanism to ensure that their official work continues and that egregious violations of rights continue to be addressed in what could be regarded as cases of “extreme urgency”. However, the present system of e-adjudication where only some of lawyers concerned (not all) and the judges get to see each other – is not the rule of law compliant. No system is better than some system – and therefore this for the present is an acceptable* system to have given that our Supreme Court of India did not have any reaction time to come up with a better system. Since, the Hon’ble Chief Justice of India has clarified that technology in courts is here to stay, going forward – the technology that should be developed must be such that it promotes “open court justice”. The principle of open court justice means that court proceedings, including the evidence and documents disclosed in proceedings, should be open to public scrutiny; and judges should give their decisions in public. In fact, Foreigners Tribunals in Assam do not follow “open court justice” system – and it is one of their most fundamental criticism. Perhaps, it is the only tribunal in India to do so. The proceedings should be such that all lawyers whose cases are listed should be able to appear in their cases and any member of the public (and the bar) should be able to see what is happening in the court and how the cases are being decided. In my view, the present system of “gate-pass” to enter courtrooms is also an anathema to “open justice” which is being followed for “crowd control” and maintaining the security of the precincts. However, in an online system, there is no reason to implement crowd control or to regulate who is entering merely to watch the court proceedings. In fact, technology should be such that first-year law students should be able to observe court proceedings while sitting in the comfort of their classroom. As a relatively young practitioner, I cannot set out in words how much we youngsters benefit just by being present in the courtroom. Just by observing the most learned judges put difficult questions to top counsels – we learn a great deal. It will be a significant loss for the junior bar if that benefit is taken away from us, by restricting who gets to watch the arguments and the decision-making process. After all, we did benefit immensely from the live telecast of the Kulbhushan Jadhav hearings at the ICJ? One incidental point that perhaps we may ponder over at a later stage (when we have deployed newer technology for filing, processing and video conferring) – whether the “judicial process” has evolved for better? We would also need an independent audit of the system at some stage. Ideally, we should have an answer to these questions before we deploy the technology, but I think we may have crossed the bridge. Therefore, going forward we would need to develop and deploy technology that firstly balances accuracy, costs and speed whilst having a guiding rationale. Secondly, it has to be inclusive and empathetic to the most ordinary of the litigants and members of the bar and their staff. Thirdly, such a technology must be compliant with all facets of the rule of law as guaranteed under the Constitution of India. It must be administered by persons who have understand the importance of the legal profession and the principles of natural justice. From where I see it, it is a long walk. We design software for the world, and we could surely do an excellent job for ourselves. Given that all the global tech giants today are lead by Indians, I am sure that in the future we would come up with something that answers all our above-mentioned concerns – including privacy and data protection where necessary. (Author is an Advocate on Record, Supreme Court of India. He graduated from NALSAR University of Law, Hyderabad in 2008 and from University of Oxford in 2009. He is practising before the Supreme Court of India from 2013) Next Storylast_img read more

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Search suspended for man and 3 children who went missing off coast of Maine: Coast Guard

first_imgUS Coast Guard(KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine) — The U.S. Coast Guard has suspended a search for a man and his three children who went missing off the coast of Maine.Watchstanders for the Coast Guard’s New England command centers received a radio distress call Saturday around 10:30 a.m. from the man, who reported that the boat he and his kids were on had capsized off the coast of Kennebunkport, Maine, according to a press release.In a mayday call released by the Coast Guard, the man states that he and his children were huddling together in the water and that they were going to try to get back onto the jon boat, which had “flipped over.”“If not, we’re all gonna just huddle in the water,” the man said.The Coast Guard lost radio communication with the man but continued to search for 22 hours over a span of 1,523 nautical miles.“We take all calls for help seriously,” said Cmdr. James McLay, the search and rescue mission coordinator for the Coast Guard’s New England sector. “We utilized every resource at our disposal and applied an extraordinary amount of search effort to locate these boaters. If there was anyone in distress we gave them the best possible chance for rescue.”The search has been halted “pending new information,” according to the Coast Guard.Additional information was not immediately available.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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OH and halogen atom influence on the variability of non-methane hydrocarbons in the Antarctic Boundary Layer

first_imgMeasurements of C2–C8 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) have been made in situ at Halley Base, Antarctica (75°35’S, 26°19’W) from February 2004 to February 2005 as part of the Chemistry of the Antarctic Boundary Layer and the Interface with Snow (CHABLIS) experiment. The data show long- and short-term variabilities in NMHCs controlled by the seasonal and geographic dependence of emissions and variation in atmospheric removal rates and pathways. Ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane and acetylene abundances followed a general OH-dependent sinusoidal seasonal cycle. The yearly averages were 186, 31, 3.2, 4.9 and 19 pptV, respectively, lower than those which were reported in some previous studies. Superimposed on a seasonal cycle was shorter-term variability that could be attributed to both synoptic airmass variability and localized loss processes due to other radical species. Hydrocarbon variability during periods of hour-to-day-long surface O3 depletion in late winter/early spring indicated active halogen atom chemistry estimated to be in the range 1.7 × 103–3.4 × 104 atom cm−3 for Cl and 4.8 × 106–9.6 × 107 atom cm−3 for Br. Longer-term negative deviations from sinusoidal behaviour in the late August were indicative of NMHC reaction with a persistent [Cl] of 2.3 × 103 atom cm−3. Maximum ethene and propene of 157 and 179 pptV, respectively, were observed in the late February/early March, consistent with increased oceanic biogenic emissions; however, their presence was significant year-round (June–August concentrations of 17.1 ± 18.3 and 7.9 ± 20.0 pptV, respectively).last_img read more

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Nitrogen isotope fractionation explains the 15N enrichment of Antarctic cryptogams by volatilized ammonia from penguin and seal colonies

first_imgVegetation near bird and seal rookeries typically has high δ15N signatures and these high values are linked to the enriched δ15N values of rookery soils. However, Antarctic cryptogams are mostly dependent on atmospheric ammonia (NH3) and volatized NH3 from rookeries is severely depleted in δ15N-NH3. So there is an apparent discrepancy between the isotopically depleted source (NH3) and δ15N-enriched vegetation. In this article, we aim to resolve this discrepancy to better understand the mechanisms and processes involved in isotopic changes during nitrogen transfer between Antarctic marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Under laboratory conditions, we quantified whether volatized NH3 affects the isotopic signature of cryptogams. NH3 volatilizing from penguin guano and elephant seal dung was depleted (44–49‰) in δ15N when captured on acidified filters, compared to the source itself. Cryptogams exposed to the volatized NH3 were enriched (18.8–23.9‰) in δ15N. The moss Andreaea regularis gained more nitrogen (0.9%) than the lichen Usnea antarctica (0.4%) from volatilized NH3, indicating a potential difference in atmospheric NH3 acquisition that is consistent with existing field differences in nitrogen concentrations and δ15N between mosses and lichens in general. This study clarifies the δ15N enrichment of cryptogams resulting from one of the most important nitrogen pathways for Antarctic vegetation.last_img read more

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