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Lee Davenport, radar physicist, 95

first_imgLee L. Davenport, a pioneering radar physicist who has been credited for helping to bring an end to World War II, died on Sept. 30, of cancer in Greenwich, Conn.Davenport was born Dec. 31, 1915, in Schenectady, N.Y. He received a B.S. from Union College in 1937, an M.S. in 1940, and a Ph.D. in physics in 1946, both from the University of Pittsburgh.From 1940 to the end of World War II, Davenport was a research fellow at the MIT Radiation Laboratory, developing the revolutionary anti-aircraft system — known as microwave radar, or Signal Corp Radio #584 — that helped save England from the V1 buzz bombs.After the war Davenport received his doctorate for his design to remote control a missile over a radar beam. It was effectively the first guided missile, and mother of today’s drones.From 1946 to 1950 Davenport served as research fellow at Harvard and coordinated the building of the University’s 92-inch cyclotron, which was then the second-largest atom smasher in the world. Davenport also taught physics at Radcliffe College during his time at Harvard.Davenport later worked in private industry, becoming the chief scientist at GTE Laboratories before retiring in 1980.He is survived by his wife, Doris Moss; daughter Carol Davenport; stepsons, Craig and Clark Moss; three grandchildren; and five step-grandchildren.A memorial service to celebrate the life of Lee Davenport will be held Oct. 22 at 2 p.m. at the First Congregational Church, 108 Sound Beach Ave., Old Greenwich, Conn.last_img read more

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Heavy consumption of sugary beverages declining in U.S.

first_imgThe percentage of Americans who were heavy consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages — those who drank more than 500 calories’ worth every day — dropped significantly from 2003 to 2016, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.They found that the percentage of children who were heavy consumers declined from 11 percent to 3 percent during that period, and the percentage of adults dropped from 13 percent to 9 percent. The study was published online Sept. 23 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.“This is promising because we know that excessive sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is related to poor health,” first author Kelsey Vercammen, a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology, said in a Sept. 24 UPI article. Heavy consumption of sugary drinks such as sodas, juices, and flavored milks has been linked to increased risk of obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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e-Vermont rural Internet development deadline for towns April 30

first_imge-Vermont is a new $4 million initiative to help rural Vermont towns take full advantage of the Internet and advance a wide variety of local needs including economic development, school innovation, job creation, downtown marketing, community engagement, and e-commerce. Two dozen communities statewide will be selected to work with the new e-Vermont Partnership in a comprehensive effort combining online services, training, access, awareness, and planning. However, applications are due by April 30 to be considered among the 12 communities for Round One.By reaching the bedrocks of Vermont communities—schools, businesses, municipal government, libraries, health and social services groups—e-Vermont will promote new collaborative efforts for identifying and implementing previously untapped resources and help our towns fully realize the potential of the digital age.The e-Vermont project will learn from each of the selected towns and share these best practices in the uses of digital tools through symposia and conferences statewide.e-Vermont is supported by a $2.5 million stimulus grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce. Additional support comes from the Evslin Family Foundation, Vermont Community Foundation, the Jan and David Blittersdorf Foundation, UVM’s Center for Rural Studies, the Vermont Rural Partnership and by donated services and equipment from Dell, Microsoft, and Comcast.Key to this major campaign is the new “e-Vermont Partnership” led by the Vermont Council on Rural Development (VCRD). VCRD is a non-profit organization dedicated to the support of the locally-defined progress of Vermont’s rural communities.In addition to VCRD, the e-Vermont Partnership is made up of the Vermont State Colleges, the Vermont Department of Libraries, the Vermont Department of Public Service, Vermont Small Business Development Center, the Snelling Center for Government, Front Porch Forum, Digital Wish, Evslin Family Foundation and Vermont Community Foundation.Local committees in participating towns will work with VCRD staff and the e-partners to customize a two year plan from a menu of programs and services such as:· e-government – training and consultation on podcasting, on-line meetings, community scheduling, website development· Front Porch Forums that link neighbors to each other and to local services· Computer equipment and enhancement of e-services in libraries· Free Netbook computers for 4-5th graders and extensive teacher training to imbed technology in the curriculum· Specialized classes ranging from basic computer literacy to advanced applications to meet the range of community and business needs· e-commerce classes and one-to-one counseling for local businesses· Building community calendars, business directories, buy-local maps, arts and crafts tours, sports schedules, ride shares, and a variety of new locally-driven digital applications· Expanding on-line computer health information and opportunities· Expanding the use of web-based tools to facilitate community engagement and advance locally-designed initiatives“The federal stimulus money provides a tremendous opportunity for Vermonters to ensure that our communities take full advantage of broadband technology, including advancing the bottom line of our businesses,” said VCRD Executive Director Paul Costello. He emphasized that none of the 24 towns are selected yet, but community applications are due by April 30.Vermont’s congressional delegates have been strong supporters of the e-Vermont concept. Senator Leahy pointed out: “The impact of e-Vermont will yield both short-term and long-term community development benefits, creating new jobs, educating children and using technology to improve Vermonters’ lives.”e-Vermont partners worked closely with Vermont’s stimulus office through the application process. According to Governor Douglas, “This effort is a key part of the SmartVermont strategy. In order to reach our goals in e-Education, e-Health, e-government, and e-Energy, we need to remove all obstacles to Internet use for Vermonters. Even when the problem of access is solved, other challenges like lack of equipment and training remain.”Municipal leaders and other local organizations that are interested in having their towns apply should contact Margaret Gibson McCoy at VCRD at 802-223-6091 or by email at [email protected](link sends e-mail). Details on the application process are posted at www.vtrural.org(link is external).Source: VCRD. 4.9.2010-30-last_img read more

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All About Timing: Mother Nature’s Calendar is Changing

first_imgAbout three years ago I was introduced to phenology, the study of the cyclical timing of natural phenomena. One interested in phenology looks at the exact timing of the emergence of milkweed shoots from the soil, the bursting of leaf buds on a red maple, and the sudden appearance of the black-throated green warbler from its Central American winter breeding grounds. Stated simply, phenology is the study of nature’s calendar.I was introduced to phenology during a trip with a colleague and our environmental science classes to the Appalachian Highland Science Learning Center, located on the eastern edge of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Sitting at just over 5,000 feet in elevation on Purchase Knob, the center offers educational programs for students and houses scientists collecting data on air quality, salamander health, phenology, and other topics. In addition to its functional capacities as a research site, Purchase Knob is beautiful, affording visitors stunning views of the Southern Appalachians.I read the supporting pre-lab materials offered by the program, but it took a while for me to grasp the essence and importance of phenology. “Why would anyone want to spend time studying phenology?” I wondered.Here’s why: Climate change is not only about warming temperatures, rising sea levels, and stronger storms. Quite subtly, climate change affects the timing of spring and fall events, such as when oaks leaf out and flower in spring—and then drop their leaves in the fall—and when insect larvae (caterpillars) hatch. Climate change threatens to alter these timings, and scientists are already gathering evidence of phenological mismatches. For example, what happens to worm-eating warbler populations if, after their long flight across the Gulf of Mexico in spring during their annual northerly migration, they encounter forests with decreased populations of caterpillars, which have begun their reproductive cycle earlier due to climate change? It may be that the worm-eating warbler may alter its timing, too, but it may also be that the warbler cannot adjust as rapidly as events change due to climate change. Hence, the study of phenology.After the trip with my class to Purchase Knob, I returned to Asheville School and set up our “phenology circuit,” a 20-minute walk with six forest trees tagged for us to monitor over the years. Throughout the school year, my classes and I walk the loop with clipboards and pencils, and we note the various phenophases of each of our trees—flowering dogwood, two red maples, Northern red oak, American hornbeam, American beech—looking closely at the leaves, flowers, and fruits. We enter our data on our Nature’s Notebook page, run by the USA National Phenology Network, which organizes the phenology data collected by students, researches, and volunteers, and then makes the data and developed models available for use available to the public.Here are some reasons why I like this simple project, and why I encourage you to consider participating, too:We are participating in citizen science, collecting data with thousands of others across the country for the greater good. Through studying years of collected data, scientists will be able to understand the effects of climate change on many different living organisms.The project is a great excuse to get outside. Inevitably, many other observations and learning opportunities arise during a phenology walk.One’s observation and estimation skills are sharpened. For example, it is not enough to note the white “flowers” of the flowering dogwood, because these are not the reproductive parts of the tree. What we generally consider to be flowers are leaf-like bracts, and the flowers are the small reproductive parts in the center of the bracts. As shown in the figure above, our flowering dogwood had 25-49% of its flowers open on April 13, and 75-94 % of its flowers open six days later.These observations allow us time to appreciate the trees. One of our trees is a small Northern red oak, and I have enjoyed simply watching it grow since the fall of 2014.Participation in this project is easy, and I encourage everyone to participate. Find a tree (or herbaceous plant or even animal) in your yard, neighborhood, or a nearby park; sign up on the Nature’s Notebook website; print out some data sheets; and get started. You’ll have one more excuse get outside, have one more reason to practice mindfulness through observation, and you’ll collect valuable research data all the while. The climate is changing, and we can all take part in helping to understand the impacts of climate change on the other living organisms in our midst.last_img read more

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SMBC Group donates $930,000 to help Indonesians impacted by COVID-19

first_imgBank holding and financial services company Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group Inc. has donated US$930,206 through the United Nations International Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to help Indonesians affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.“These are challenging times for everyone all over the world.  Global collaboration is now more important than ever to find ways to overcome the common challenges posed by COVID-19,” the company’s global business unit deputy head, Ryuji Nishisaki, said in a statement on Friday. Nishisaki added the donation from the Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation (SMBC) group served as an example of the institution’s commitment to contributing to Indonesia’s economy and society “especially in the time of a global health crisis that has caused immediate impacts on people’s livelihoods.”Read also: Anti-COVID-19 initiatives: Helping Indonesia fight the outbreakUNICEF representative to Indonesia, Debora Comini, said the UN body appreciated the donation.“During this extraordinary time, UNICEF is pleased to accept this assistance from SMBC Group. This will allow us to further expand our response programs to mitigate the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on the health and livelihoods of children and women,” said Comini. Separately, employees of publicly-listed private lender Bank Tabungan Pensiunan Negara (BTPN) – in which SMBC has a 96.89 percent stake – raised Rp 166 million in donations to provide personal protective equipment to medical workers in various health facilities in 10 provinces across the country.Topics :last_img read more

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Governor Wolf: $2.5 Million Available to Connect Teachers and Local Employers, Boosting Job Training for Students

first_img Economy,  Education,  Jobs That Pay,  PAsmart,  Press Release,  Workforce Development Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced that $2.5 million is available for Teacher in the Workplace grants that will partner school districts with local businesses, resulting in new career opportunities for students.“I am firmly committed to giving Pennsylvania students, workers and businesses the opportunities they need to thrive in our 21st century economy,” said Governor Wolf. “These grants are truly a win-win for all involved, as the vital partnerships they create will result in students being better prepared to successfully enter the workforce.”Creating new opportunities for students and workers is an essential component of the governor’s PAsmart initiative. A new way to improve coordination between state agencies, cut red tape, and invest in people and business, PAsmart expands innovative job training for students and workers.A total of $2.5 million in funding is available through the Department of Labor & Industry (L&I) to eligible organizations who partner with their local workforce development board to implement Teacher in the Workplace programs. These programs partner educators with local businesses to share and exchange information that can then be used to enhance students’ classroom instruction.“A knowledge-based, 21st century economy demands a workforce that is prepared to tackle today’s challenges and tomorrow’s opportunities,” said L&I Secretary Jerry Oleksiak. “Developing the skilled workforce that businesses need by improving access to education, training programs, and apprenticeships for students and workers is a top priority of the Wolf Administration.”Teacher in the Workplace programs allow teachers, counselors and school administrators to interact directly with industry and business leaders to learn about industry trends, needs and opportunities. This first-hand experience and knowledge can then be used to enhance classroom instruction, student learning, and career readiness.“Local business leaders know what skills they require in their employees to successfully run their businesses, so they are uniquely positioned to provide insight to school administrators and teachers,” said Secretary of Education Pedro A. Rivera. “Teacher in the Workplace grants provide a critical pathway to connect classrooms with local industries so our students are best prepared to start a career, earn a certificate or enroll in college.”The Teacher in the Workplace grants are funded through federal money made available from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act. Eligible applicants include local education entities, businesses and chambers of commerce, labor organizations, postsecondary institutions, community-based organizations, public libraries, trade associations, and economic development entities.Additional details and the grant application can be found on L&I’s website. The application deadline is December 21, 2018.For more information about pursuing an education and career in Pennsylvania at any stage of life, visit PAsmart. Governor Wolf: $2.5 Million Available to Connect Teachers and Local Employers, Boosting Job Training for Students October 25, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Plenty of space for the family in Scarborough home

first_imgThe updated kitchen at 17 Fernlea Ave, Scarborough.The separate granny flat has an open-plan living, dining and kitchen area, bedroom, study, laundry, bathroom and toilet. Outside there is an inground pool, a cabana for poolside entertaining, and tropical gardens. Mr Maclean said his favourite space in the home was the back balcony with views over the gardens and pool. “It’s very peaceful,” he said.The property is being marketed by Cameron Reid of Crown Properties Redcliffe for offers over $879,000. The poolside area at 17 Fernlea Ave, Scarborough.More from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 2019On the ground floor there is a bedroom, rumpus room, storage space, laundry and bathroom with shower and toilet. Upstairs, the master bedroom has built-in robes and front balcony access and the two other bedrooms have built-in robes and access to the back balcony.The family bathroom has a shower and toilet. There is a separate lounge room and an open-plan living, dining and kitchen area, which opens to the back balcony. The updated kitchen has plenty of bench and cupboard space and stainless steel appliances. The home at 17 Fernlea Ave, Scarborough.THIS Scarborough property has been a much-loved family home for 30 years. Duncan and Mary Maclean were living at the other end of Fernlea Ave when they bought No. 17 in 1987 with their extended family in mind. Mr Maclean said his mother had passed away when they bought the home and the granny flat on the property was the perfect place for his father to live. “My dad lived with us for 23 years at that house,” he said. The Macleans also raised their three children in the house and have seen first-hand how well it stands up to family life. “The house was built in 1971 and, though we’ve updated the bathrooms and kitchen, it’s an older home that has been well in truly lived in,” Mr Maclean said.“It is very much a family home full of memories.”last_img read more

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One in 10 Queensland homes empty, with some areas seeing as much as a fifth unoccupied

first_imgAerial view over Little Cove Noosa looking towards Main Beach. Noosa had one of the highest coastal unoccupied property rates in Queensland on census night. Picture: Lachie MillardThe Gold and Sunshine Coasts, where a lot of southern investment dollars have headed in the past two years, also returned double digit unoccupied figures. Census 2016 listed 12.4 per cent of Sunshine Coast private dwellings as empty (18,230 homes), and 10.5 per cent of those on the Gold Coast, which was a whopping 23,832 privately held properties. Cairns, which is considered the tourism gateway to the Great Barrier Reef, had 11.7 per cent of private dwellings listed as empty on census night.But much higher levels of empty properties were recorded in areas where there was significant property investment linked to the resources boom, with Gladstone for example seeing 19.2 per cent of properties (5,087) unoccupied. Townsville, which also took a hit during the resource downturn, had 12.4 per cent of homes listed as unoccupied, a figure that accounted for over 11,400 homes. The national average vacant property rate was 11.2 per cent with over one million homes across the country listed as empty on census night. Not a soul in sight: Investment in holiday destinations such as the Gold Coast has been strong in recent years especially from equity-rich southern buyers. Picture: Mike BatterhamONE in 10 homes in Queensland was empty on census night, with the rise in investment properties believed to be one of the causes.Census 2016 data showed 195,570 homes in Queensland were classed as unoccupied on census night, a figure that made up 10.6 per cent of dwellings in the state.The figure was a rise from 2011’s result of 10.3 per cent, when 177,912 properties were unoccupied on census night.Brisbane emerged with the highest number of unoccupied homes on census night, listed as a whopping 68,401 by Census 2016.Investment properties and empty holiday homes were believed to be part of the issue across the board, with some leisure zones showing as much as a fifth of properties was vacant.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours agoPopular tourism destination Noosa showed a significantly higher proportion of empty properties than other coastal holiday home zones, with 20.6 per cent of properties classed as unoccupied on census night.last_img read more

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Love it or loathe it, this big grey box just sold for big dollars — but wait until you see the back

first_imgThis house at 107 Masthead Dr, Cleveland, has sold for $1.75m.The five-bedroom, three-bathroom property at 107 Masthead Drive fetched $1.75 million.The home overlooks Moreton Bay and backs on to a canal.Features include a swimming pool, pontoon, marble tiling, fireplace, Vacumaid and security gates.It was marketed by NGU Real Estate Toowong. This house at 107 Masthead Dr, Cleveland, has sold for $1.75m. The view from the back of 10 Twigg St, Indooroopilly.Inside, the middle level accommodates an open plan living and dining area, which opens out onto a large balcony to make the most of the breathtaking views.The bedrooms are upstairs and the master has ‘his and hers’ walk-in robes and an ensuite with double vanity, bath and double-head shower.The store room downstairs on the lower level has been converted into a self-contained granny flat, accessed via a private entry or wheelchair accessible lift.It offers a full kitchen with oven, microwave and cooktop with a spacious living area and views over the pool, landscaped garden and river.The second biggest sale of the week in Queensland, according to CoreLogic, was another family home in Cleveland, about 25km east of Brisbane’s CBD. This house at 10 Twigg St, Indooroopilly, just sold for $2.35 million.LOVE it or loathe it, this contemporary riverfront home just sold for $2.35 million.It might look like a big, grey box from the front, but it’s what’s at the back that will surprise you. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE This house at 10 Twigg St, Indooroopilly, has sold for $2.35m.Spanning three levels of luxury overlooking the Brisbane River, this house at 10 Twigg Street, Indooroopilly was the biggest sale in Queensland over the past week, according to property researcher CoreLogic.The home was sold by Jason Adcock of Adcock Prestige, after being on the market with a number of different agents for more than two years.The property has five bedrooms and four bathrooms and sits on a 914 sqm absolute riverfront block of land. BARGAIN BUY ON EPHRAIM MODERN LUXURY AT ITS VERY BEST WHEN FLATMATES BECOME SOULMATES More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agolast_img read more

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Netspar: Technology will ‘force providers to specialise’

first_imgTechnological developments will force pensions providers to specialise in either pensions administration or asset management, or to develop into a financial adviser, research by Dutch think-tank Netspar has suggested. Bas Werker, professor of finance and econometry at Tilburg University, said that providers should start assessing their future position, citing the increase of both available data and computing power, “which will make it easier to predict risks at an individual level”.However, he noted that this, in turn, could affect the desired level of solidarity between pension fund participants.Netspar’s findings were published this month in a report by Werker, Bastiaan Starink and Wesley Kaufmann, all of Tilburg University. The working group behind the report said it expected pension products to become simpler through standardisation and European legislation.Werker said: “Pension providers could draw their view of the future on roughly four scenarios, based on fragmentation and concentration in both demand and supply.“Fragmentation in demand, for example, reflects a situation in which every individual arranges a pension with a provider, which would lead to very many different suppliers, offering parts of services.”He continued: “Currently, there are a limited number of both suppliers and groups of participants.”In Werker’s opinion, pension providers must look into these kind of scenarios.He suggested that social and technological developments should also be part of the discussions about pensions reform, “as these trends thunder through and can’t be stopped through legislation”.The working group concluded that providers must specialise in, for example, efficiently offering a certain product in the pensions chain or offering financial advice.“This advice is to become broader than just pensions,” Werker argued, “not only because of existing demand but also because providers could get access to more information about their participants.”He recommended that providers should be divided into product suppliers and consultancies.Additional Netspar research – on the impact of data science on options and advice – concluded that linking databases could strongly improve the quality of advice about choices.According to the authors, linking databases would allow details about current and future income and assets to be factored in. Currently, pensions providers usually only have information available about accrued pensions.last_img read more

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