Home » Archive by category "mbewboiz"

Disappearing buses and service unreliable

first_imgNewsPoliticsTransportDisappearing buses and service unreliableBy Alan Jacques – March 21, 2019 1461 Email RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick on Covid watch list TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Local backlash over Aer Lingus threat TAGSFianna FáilJames CollinsLimerick City and CountyLocal Elections 2019NewspoliticsTransport WhatsApp Facebook Advertisementcenter_img Print Twitter Linkedin Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites James Collins, Fianna Fáil. Photo: Cian ReinhardtMAYOR of Limerick City and County, Cllr James Collins has called on the National Transport Authority (NTA) and Bus Éireann to address widespread public dissatisfaction with Limerick’s bus service.Speaking at this Monday’s meeting of the Metropolitan District, Mayor Collins hit out at the current bus service, claiming it “isn’t reliable or trustworthy”.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “There are larger, long term strategic questions that have to be addressed by the NTA but there are immediate operational measures that Bus Éireann could take to address growing customer dissatisfaction with the bus service we are getting in Limerick,” Mayor Collins commented.“The complaints are simple – the buses don’t run on time, they sometimes arrive in pairs, they sometimes disappear off the app providing online tracking. Real time bus stop information must be accurate. We need both local and express services.“It doesn’t matter whether it’s Mungret, Dooradoyle or Raheen, Caherdavin or Castletroy, the problem extends throughout the Metropolitan bus service.”Mayor Collins went on to thank the Gardaí for committing to increase enforcement on drivers either using bus lanes or parking in bus stops. But he also called on them to manage traffic at key punch points such as the Parkway Roundabout.He also maintains there are immediate operational measures Bus Éireann can take to “get the buses moving”.“Bus Éireann needs to engage with the Council and An Garda Siochana because the bus service doesn’t operate in isolation. We need a new transport strategy for Limerick, and a functioning, efficient, bus service is a vital part of that.His Fianna Fáil party colleague Cllr Kieran O’Hanlon took the view that a special meeting was needed to discuss the city’s bus service.“There are a lot of issues. We need a far more radical overhaul than just getting from A to B. Out in the housing estate in Rhebogue there is no bus service. This is just not good enough,” he insisted.“There are a lot of issues to discuss in making a plan for immediate action. In Ballinacurra Road there was holy blue murder when we put in a bus lane. If we are serious about a bus corridor then tough decisions are going to have to be made in here.”Independent councillor John Loftus, who pointed out that he doesn’t own a car, said he found it faster to walk than rely on public transport.“The NTA need to get their finger out,” he said.Cllr Sean Lynch (FF) told council members that he recently took a bus ride from the University of Limerick to Raheen, which took “two hours”.  He also called for Bus Éireann to look at providing services to Patrickswell, Mungret and Clarina.Sinn Féin councillor John Costello took issue that no one had mentioned the bus drivers during the debate on city bus services.“They are at the coalface. They are ambassadors for our city. They have to put up with being abused, being spat at, and racial abuse as well. The driver is a very important element in all this,” he told council members.Councillors also expressed their dissatisfaction that Bus Éireann were not in attendance at this month’s Metropolitan District meeting to discuss their concerns. However, a statement to council members explained that Bus Éireann are currently in the final stages of reviewing operating data with a view to altering their timetable.“The new punctuality assessed timetables are expected to be introduced in April 2019. These revised timetables will reflect actual traffic conditions including congestion pinch points and will deliver a considerable increase in reliability and punctuality on all Limerick city routes. Following on from this and also in conjunction with the National Transport Authority, there will be a more significant review which will look at the routings, frequencies and stops on transport in the Limerick City environs.” Limerick City Council accept proposal for County Limerick dog park on 6 month trial basis Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Previous articleSheriff YC re-instated to FAI Junior Cup after objection against RegionalNext articleGarda Noel has been released from dialysis Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie last_img read more

Continue reading »

Rock Community Hospital residents to be transferred to St Joseph’s

first_img Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Rock Community Hospital residents to be transferred to St Joseph’s By News Highland – April 11, 2020 Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Pinterest As of today 11th of April the HSE will transfer all residential patients from the Rock Community Hospital Ballyshannon to St Joseph’s Community Hospital, Stranorlar.The Rock Community Hospital is an old building and the HSE say this action is being taken due to Covid -19 in the best interests of patient safety and in accordance with Public Health and Infection Control guidance.All families/guardians have been contacted and explained the rationale behind why their loved ones are been moved.The HSE say they wish to apologies to all patients and their families for any inconvenience caused and will continue to review and assess the situation. Twitter WhatsApp Previous articleTests shipped to Germany due to be completed by next weekNext articleLYIT Donegal duo claim Ireland National League All Stars News Highland Google+ Homepage BannerNews Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows center_img Pinterest WhatsApp Google+ Twitter Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Facebook Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme last_img read more

Continue reading »

Miami Heat suspend Dion Waiters 10 games over ‘very scary situation’

first_img Beau Lund Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailTar_Heel_Rob/iStock(MIAMI) — Miami Heat shooting guard Dion Waiters has been suspended 10 games without pay over what the team described as a “very scary situation” that occurred last Thursday night.Citing sources, ESPN reports the situation involved the 27-year-old experiencing a “panic attack” aboard a team flight to Los Angeles after he consumed an edible infused with THC.“We are very disappointed in Dion’s actions this season that include the very scary situation on Thursday night, and grateful that the outcome wasn’t worse,” the Heat said in a statement Sunday.“There have been a number of instances this season in which Dion has engaged in conduct detrimental to the team. Accordingly, he will be suspended without pay for 10 games, including the [Los Angeles] Lakers game last Friday, and will be eligible to return after the Golden State Warriors game on November 29th,” the statement continued.Waiters was previously suspended by Miami for taking to social media to voice his frustrations about his place on the team. That suspension cost him playing in the Heat’s first game of the season last month.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.center_img November 11, 2019 /Sports News – National Miami Heat suspend Dion Waiters 10 games over ‘very scary situation’last_img read more

Continue reading »

Typhoo’s across-the-board pitch

first_imgTea brand Typhoo will work in partnership with Alan Ramsay Sales & Marketing (AR-SM), to futher access their convenience, foodservice and cash & carry channels.AR-SM has already worked with Typhoo for the past three years in the wholesale sector.”As a business, we are in strong growth in the impulse channel and recognise that we require additional headcount if we are to achieve continued growth and the brand’s true potential across our range,” said Typhoo’s Bill Smith-Coats, general sales manager for impulse.[http://www.typhoo.com]last_img read more

Continue reading »

Retail bakery teams revised

first_imgSainsbury’s and Asda have welcomed several new faces to their bakery teams in recent weeks.Asda has an almost entirely new team in place in its bakery department. Director Ian Martin joined in spring, and Laura Sayer has joined as in-store bread buyer, Rosalind Kennerley as in-store cake buyer, Holly Mobley as bought-in bread buyer, and Sue Thompson as buying manager for cake.Senior in-store bread buyer David Bradley remains in place.At Sainsbury’s Nick Townend has been replaced by Kim Brown as category manager for bakery and Nic Storey is the new in-store bakery buyer for bread and rolls.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Equality Act – in force

first_imgThe Act brings together nine existing pieces of discrimination legislation into one single Act.The same characteristics that were protected by existing discrimination legislation (age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sexual orientation, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity) are now known as “protected characteristics”.The Act extends discrimination law in line with case law to cover both associative discrimination (direct discrimination against someone because they associated with someone who has a protected characteristic); and perceptive discrimination (direct discrimination against someone because others think they have a particular protected characteristic).Disability discrimination is extended to include discrimination “arising from” a disability for example, treating someone with dyslexia unfavourably because of their tendency to make spelling mistakes. Indirect discrimination has also been extended to cover disabled people. Employers may no longer ask questions about job applicants’ health before making a job offer, except in five limited circumstances.These are where the questions are necessary to:l discover whether reasonable adjustments have to be made to the selection processl decide whether an applicant can carry out a function that is essential to the jobl monitor diversity among applicantsl take positive action to help a disabled person where that is allowed by other provisionsl check that the candidate actually has a particular disability genuinely required by the job provided that requirement is a “proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim”.ACAS has advised: “From October employers should no longer send out pre-health questionnaires with employment application packs.”Transsexuals no longer have to be under medical supervision to be protected.A person bringing an equal pay claim can now rely on a hypothetical comparator (also see below). Previously a claimant had to compare him/herself against someone of the opposite sex doing equal work in the organisation.Employers cannot prevent their employees from discussing whether there are differences in their pay related to a protected characteristic.”Gagging clauses” in employment contracts are now banned.last_img read more

Continue reading »

Trading stays tough on the high street

first_imgThe amalgamation of red tape holding back retailers is making life tough on the high street, according the British Retail Consortium’s director general.In an interview with BBC News this week, Stephen Robertson spoke of the tough trading conditions for retailers following the publication of the BRC and KPMG Retail Sales Monitor for October.UK retail sales values for the month saw a 1.1% rise, compared to a 1.5% growth in October last year, but like-for-like sales were down by 0.1% during the same period. This is the weakest sales growth for 11 months and one of the worst performing months for 2012.Robertson said: “There are differences across the sector and obviously the value sector continues to perform well and the premium sector seems to have largely weathered the recession better than most. But the fact is most retailers are somewhere in the middle and I think what we are seeing across the piece is that most retailers have increased their efficiency, paid a lot of attention to making sure customer service is at the heart of their business.“But I’m afraid however much you work on those issues, the economic facts of consumers not having much to spend, fiercely rising costs and on top of that, red tape continues to pile up, meaning that life is very tough on the high street.”When asked whether the modest sales revival in September was something of a false hope, he responded: “Those September numbers did give us a bit of encouragement, which has been rather dashed by these miserable October numbers. It’s pretty much on all fronts; food and non-food had a very dull time in October, and even the bright lights of online dimmed a little, because we saw the rate of growth drop sharply back to +8%.”He added that in the approach to Christmas, November and December will be absolutely critical to retailers to producing the profit businesses need to continue.“It is critical that we see for many retailers, who sometimes produce 50% of their profit from these last three trading months, if they are going to continue into next year, they need to make sure they deliver here. And of course at this time we have seen a hefty increase in business rates that are affecting retailers disproportionately, so that is hurting them as well at this very sensitive time.”USE YOUR LOAF! SHOP ON THE HIGH STREET British Baker launched a new awareness campaign this month to help bakers promote the benefits of high street shopping.‘Use Your Loaf! Shop on the High Street’ will aim to tackle problems bakery retailers are faced with on a daily basis, such as parking charges, increasing rents and antisocial behaviour. It will also look at ways to bring back shoppers to the UK’s high street, as increasing numbers of people turn to the internet, out-of-town superstores and the multiples.BB’s campaign will run in association with the National Association of Master Bakers (NAMB) and is looking for further champions from the industry, businesses or individuals, from up and down the country to step forward and promote the values of the campaign to fellow high street bakers and retailers.Christopher Freeman, NAMB president and owner of Dunn’s Bakery in Crouch End, London, said: “Having worked in the high street for more than 40 years, I still believe we have a place, despite stiff competition. We offer diversiy from the monoculture of any street, any town, any county.”To keep up-to-date with the Use Your Loaf! Shop on the High Street campaign, tell us your views on your local high street, or to find out more information on any trading problems you are having:Like our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/useyourloafcampaignFollow us on Twitter: @UseYourLoaf_BB and hashtag #highstreetEmail us: [email protected] our dedicated hotline: 01293 846594Read British Baker every fortnight and visit www.bakeryinfo.co.uk dailylast_img read more

Continue reading »

Asda appoints new marketing VP

first_imgSupermarket giant Asda has recruited a vice-president of marketing from Premier Foods, the company behind Mr Kipling cakes. Claire Harrison’s appointment follows the promotion of Barry Williams from chief merchandising officer for food to chief customer officer.Harrison will join the supermarket group on 26 January from her Premier Foods role as category business unit director since 2012. Other work in her career has included leading retail teams at KFC, Boots, Unilever and Asda competitor Sainsbury’s. She will now join Lizzy Massey, vice-president of customer services, in reporting to Williams.Harrison will focus on Asda’s marketing strategy with advertising, press, television slots and in-store marketing, while Massey will head Asda’s attempts to understand the customer and how the company drives engagement with shoppers to ensure it continues to “champion the customer”.Williams said: “Her [Harrison’s] wealth of experience across the retail industry and marketing will be well placed within the Asda family. She will be leading a hugely skilled and professional team during an exciting period in our business and I look forward to her making her mark with us and our customers.”last_img read more

Continue reading »

GSE dean debates online speech

first_imgShould schools punish students for online speech? That question, posed by Harvard Graduate School of Education (GSE) Dean James Ryan as part of his J-Term seminar, opened the doors to many more. Calling the issue “remarkably difficult” in terms of law and policy, Ryan pushed students to think deeply about issues regarding online speech facing courts and school officials today.“As you know, social media is pervasive; students communicate all the time online,” Ryan said. “Sometimes students say incredibly nasty things — beyond nasty — they harass, they torture other students through online postings, leading to a new term in our vocabulary: not just bullying, but cyberbullying.”The dilemma for many school officials is whether to intervene. Whether they do or don’t, schools may face liability — and existing laws may offer them little guidance.“The law is really unclear. What you won’t get out of this session is a bright-line rule about when schools can intervene or when they have to intervene because unfortunately the law is not yet settled,” Ryan said during a two-hour discussion in which he urged students to move past what the law already says. “The court has not yet issued a definite ruling about the rights of students in this context. The nice thing is it gives us an opportunity to think about what that rule would look like.”The class delved into cases examining student activity online, ranging from threats of physical harm to images of sexual acts to inappropriate messages about teachers. Through the lens of landmark cases dealing with schools and student speech, such as Tinker v. Des Moines and Bethel v. Fraser, the seminar wrestled with whether and how any of their findings could apply in today’s wired world.In the end, the students were divided. While some thought a line could be drawn based on place and timing — whether or not an offensive post was made during school hours, and from a computer on campus — others struggled with whether it mattered where the online speech originated, especially if it had potential to harm the school, staff, or students. “It’s always foreseeable that online speech could end up on campus,” Ryan reminded the class. Similar questions arose regarding the content of online speech. How is harm determined? If educators become monitors of speech, does that violate students’ First Amendment rights?“You see the problem, right? Schools don’t know what the rules are — that’s a problem,” Ryan said. “If you act, you might get sued. But it’s a problem if you don’t act and harm occurs, because you might get sued. So, what school officials would like most of all is clarity, and right now there is no clarity because the court has not spoken about what the rules should be.”While states have begun to set their own rules, in particular about cyberbullying, Ryan noted there was still time for school boards and courts to weigh in. The issue of online speech isn’t one that is likely to go away until it is decided by a higher court, which Ryan anticipates within the next five years.last_img read more

Continue reading »

A flawed masterpiece

first_imgWhat they found reflects what Capellini suggests indicates “positive selection”: evidence that this new knee gave the fledgling bipeds an evolutionary advantage. The highest-functioning knees would have been selected, reducing variation in knee shape over time by decreasing the genetic variation in the switches that control the joint’s formation. What variation persisted likely didn’t substantially matter at that time.“Later, as human populations expand and drift, you start getting these genetic variants that slightly modify how the knee is shaped or how the knee is maintained,” explained Daniel Richard, a Ph.D. candidate in human evolutionary biology and lead author on the paper. “Those slight deviations, acting on this constrained knee, lead to risk for developing osteoarthritis.”Those traits did not affect the success of the bipedal knee because natural selection promotes traits that allow individuals to reach sexual maturity and successfully breed. In essence, because this new knee gave young adults an edge in passing on their genetic material, it continued despite these variants. Our eventual old age had little role in its selection.“We think that these slight modifications don’t so much impact early life,” said Richard. “But when you keep on walking up until you’re 50 or 60, over that longer time span a super small change in your knee compounds over decades. Eventually it contributes to osteoarthritis disease in the elderly.”As proof of principle, Capellini and colleagues performed two additional experiments. By studying knee switches in patients with osteoarthritis compared with the general population, they found that osteoarthritis patients have on average more genetic variants in switches than those who don’t have the disease. They also focused on a gene called GDF5 (Growth Differentiation Factor Five) that contributes to osteoarthritis risk in Europeans and Asians. Using CRISPR editing in mice and human cells, they pinpointed a genetic variant, present in billions of people, that affects the function of a key knee switch, changing knee shape and increasing osteoarthritis risk.The stiffness and soreness humans feel today may simply have piggybacked on an evolutionary advantage. In other words, osteoarthritis came along with the knee. And the pain may pay off in the study of human evolution, the researchers said. “The idea of tying new features with almost new diseases is a good mental framework to think of while studying these diseases of aging,” said Richard. “You can’t really have your cake and eat it too.” Research from Lieberman Lab goes deep to clarify prevalence of osteoarthritis The human knee is a triumph of design. The joint, which evolved fairly rapidly from our common ancestor with the chimpanzee to accommodate bipedalism, likely contributed to our success as a species. However, as the human lifespan extended, the flaw in the design emerged: pain, in the form of osteoarthritis.In a new paper published in Cell, “Evolutionary Selection and Constraint on Human Knee Chondrocyte Regulation Impacts Osteoarthritis Risk,” researchers exploring the genetic features that help make this sophisticated joint possible found that the regulatory switches involved in its development also play a role in this partially heritable disease, which afflicts at least 250 million people worldwide.Terence D. Capellini, Richard B. Wolf Associate Professor in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology and the paper’s corresponding author, explained it in terms of a burden our knees literally endure.“From an evolutionary standpoint, the primate knee went from something that accommodated the forces of walking on four legs to placing all the weight on two legs,” he said. “Going from a quadruped to a biped changes the force distribution. All our weight is being transmitted through our hips and our knees down to our ankles. The cells in the joint and the shape of the joint had to change to accommodate those new forces.”With such a specific task — and limited by its origins in the older primate knee — the optimized bipedal knee developed what is known as a constrained morphology, that is, it did not allow much variation. “As you can imagine, when you’re designing a part for an airplane, you don’t want to stray too much,” Capellini said.To understand how this complex mechanism developed, researchers looked for evidence of accelerated natural selection: the series of mutations helped us walk upright.“We wanted to know whether or not we could see signs of ancient evolution — ancient selection — in the regions of the genome that specifically sculpt the knee,” said Capellini. To that end, they searched for traces of specific regulatory switches, pieces of DNA “responsible for turning on and off the genetic material that make the knee a human knee.” Related Quitting smoking may reduce risk of rheumatoid arthritis A better delivery system brings anti-inflammatory therapies to critical sites   Studies say stopping can delay or even prevent the most severe form of ailment Treating inflammatory arthritis with hydrogel Bad knees through the ageslast_img read more

Continue reading »